Special Issue "Nutrients Influence on Kidney Diseases"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yoshiyuki Morishita

Guest Editor
Division of Nephrology, Department of Integrated Medicine, Saitama Medical Center Jichi Medical University. 1-847, Amanuma, Omiya-ku, Saitama-city, Saitama, 330-8503, Japan
Dr. Naoki Nakagawa

Guest Editor
Division of Cardiology, Nephrology, Pulmonology and Neurology Department of Internal Medicine Asahikawa Medical University, 2-1-1-1 Midorigaoka higashi. Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan

Special Issue Information

Nutrients and kidney diseases strongly influence each other. Kidneys filter and re-absorb various nutritional elements. Additionally, they synthesize many hormones, such as renin, erythropoietin, and prostaglandin, to maintain body homeostasis. Therefore, kidney diseases such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease owing to various pathological conditions may cause many kinds of nutrient abnormalities leading to malnutrition, anemia, mineral bone disorder, and more. Conversely, nutrients have been reported to affect the prognosis of patients with kidney diseases. Malnutrition is a strong predictor in determining the prognosis of patients with kidney diseases. Additionally, dietary therapy as represented by protein restriction to protect renal function in patients with kidney disease may cause protein energy wasting resulting in frailty syndrome, which decreases quality of life and leads to poor prognosis.

The aim of this Special Issue is to update our knowledge of nutrients in kidney disease as it relates to pathogenesis, molecular mechanisms, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

Dr. Yoshiyuki Morishita
Dr. Naoki Nakagawa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrients
  • Kidney
  • Acute Kidney Disease
  • Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Clinical Manifestation
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatments

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Serum Fatty Acids Profile in Kidney Transplant Recipients
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030805 - 28 Feb 2021
Abstract
Patients with end-stage kidney disease, treated with renal transplantation, are at increased risk of cardio-vascular disease (CVD) and cardio-vascular mortality. They are also characterized by an atherogenic dyslipidemia. Alterations of the fatty acids (FA) profile contribute to increased cardio-vascular risk in the general [...] Read more.
Patients with end-stage kidney disease, treated with renal transplantation, are at increased risk of cardio-vascular disease (CVD) and cardio-vascular mortality. They are also characterized by an atherogenic dyslipidemia. Alterations of the fatty acids (FA) profile contribute to increased cardio-vascular risk in the general population. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that kidney transplantation is associated with ab-normalities in FA profile. The FA profile was analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry in 198 renal transplant recipients, and 48 control subjects. The most profound differences between renal transplant patients and controls were related to the content of branched chain FA, monounsaturated FA, and n-6 polyunsaturated FA, respectively. The FA profile significantly separated the patients from the controls in the principal component analysis (PCA). The abnormalities of FA profile showed a tendency for normalization in long-term kidney recipients, as compared to patients with recent transplants. The n-3 PUFA content demonstrated a strong inverse association with the presence of inflammation. Most profound alterations of the FA profile were observed in patients with impaired graft function (glomerular filtration rate < 45 mL/min). The study demonstrated significant disorders of the FA profile in kidney transplant recipients, which might contribute to cardio-vascular risk in this vulnerable patient population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Influence on Kidney Diseases)
Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Nutritional Interventions on Long-Term Patient Survival in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 621; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020621 - 14 Feb 2021
Viewed by 463
Abstract
Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) are at high risk of malnutrition and subsequent related mortality when starting dialysis. However, there have been few clinical studies on the effect of nutritional interventions on long-term patient survival. A 2-year longitudinal study was conducted from [...] Read more.
Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) are at high risk of malnutrition and subsequent related mortality when starting dialysis. However, there have been few clinical studies on the effect of nutritional interventions on long-term patient survival. A 2-year longitudinal study was conducted from January 2012 to December 2016. A total of 186 patients with non-dialysis ESKD started the nutritional education program (NEP), and 169 completed it. A total of 128 patients participated in a NEP over 6 months (personalized diet, education and oral supplementation, if needed). The control group (n = 45) underwent no specific nutritional intervention. The hospitalization rate was significantly lower for the patients with NEP (13.7%) compared with the control patients (26.7%) (p = 0.004). The mortality odds ratio for the patients who did not receive NEP was 2.883 (95% CI 0.993–8.3365, p = 0.051). The multivariate analysis showed an independent association between mortality and age (OR, 1.103; 95% CI 1.041–1.169; p = 0.001) and between mortality and the female sex (OR, 3.332; 95% CI 1.054–10.535; p = 0.040) but not between mortality and those with NEP (p = 0.051). Individualized nutrition education has long-term positive effects on nutritional status, reduces hospital admissions and increases survival among patients with advanced CKD who are starting dialysis programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Influence on Kidney Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Inorganic Phosphate Intake by the Measurement of the Phosphate/Urea Nitrogen Ratio in Urine
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020292 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 390
Abstract
In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, it would be desirable to reduce the intake of inorganic phosphate (P) rather than limit the intake of P contained in proteins. Urinary excretion of P should reflect intestinal absorption of P(inorganic plus protein-derived). The aim of [...] Read more.
In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, it would be desirable to reduce the intake of inorganic phosphate (P) rather than limit the intake of P contained in proteins. Urinary excretion of P should reflect intestinal absorption of P(inorganic plus protein-derived). The aim of the present study is to determine whether the ratio of urinary P to urinary urea nitrogen (P/UUN ratio) helps identify patients with a high intake of inorganic P.A cross-sectional study was performed in 71 patients affected by metabolic syndrome with CKD (stages 2–3) with normal serum P concentration. A 3-day dietary survey was performed to estimate the average daily amount and the source of P ingested. The daily intake of P was 1086.5 ± 361.3 mg/day; 64% contained in animal proteins, 22% in vegetable proteins, and 14% as inorganic P. The total amount of P ingested did not correlate with daily phosphaturia, but it did correlate with the P/UUN ratio (p < 0.018). Patients with the highest tertile of the P/UUN ratio >71.1 mg/g presented more abundant inorganic P intake (p < 0.038).The P/UUN ratio is suggested to be a marker of inorganic P intake. This finding might be useful in clinical practices to identify the source of dietary P and to make personalized dietary recommendations directed to reduce inorganic P intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Influence on Kidney Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop