Special Issue "Natural Products, Micronutrient and Nutraceuticals to Improve Mood Disorders and Enhance Cognitive Function"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Corinne Joffre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INRAE, Nutrition and Neurobiology, Integrated, UMR 1286, Bordeaux, France
Interests: Nutrition; Neuroscience; Lipid Metabolism; Lipids Inflammatory; Biomarkers Fatty Acids; Phospholipids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emotional and cognitive dysfunctions are increasing in our society, leading to neuropsychiatric disorders. Among the preventive strategies that are encouraged, nutrition is a crucial environmental contributing factor to which the individuals are exposed throughout their life.

Epidemiological, clinical, and preclinical data suggest that poor dietary habits largely contribute to emotional and cognitive dysfunctions that are exacerbated with age, whereas dietary supplementation may help to improve mood disorders and enhance cognitive functions. The use of certain nutrients as medicinal supplements influences specific molecular systems and mechanisms that maintain mental function. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of several micronutrients such as polyphenols, vitamins, essential fatty acids, and minerals on brain health. However, there is still no consensus about optimal strategies for dietary intervention in mental health. We have to define how micronutrients and nutraceuticals affect the signaling pathways involved in brain functions and the conditions for therapeutic applications in humans to influence life quality and to delay the onset and progression of mental health disease.

Here, we invite experts to contribute to this Special Issue with original research or review articles that investigate the effects of natural products, micronutrients, and nutraceuticals on mental health (mood and cognitive aspects) that may participate in the development of novel predictive, personalized, and preventive participatory approaches.

Dr. Corinne Joffre
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mood disorders
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Micronutrients
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Mental disease
  • Dysfunction

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Saffron Extract-Induced Improvement of Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice Is Associated with Modulation of Monoaminergic Neurotransmission
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 904; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030904 - 11 Mar 2021
Viewed by 909
Abstract
Depressive disorders represent a major public health concern and display a continuously rising prevalence. Importantly, a large proportion of patients develops aversive side effects and/or does not respond properly to conventional antidepressants. These issues highlight the need to identify further therapeutic strategies, including [...] Read more.
Depressive disorders represent a major public health concern and display a continuously rising prevalence. Importantly, a large proportion of patients develops aversive side effects and/or does not respond properly to conventional antidepressants. These issues highlight the need to identify further therapeutic strategies, including nutritional approaches using natural plant extracts with known beneficial impacts on health. In that context, growing evidence suggests that saffron could be a particularly promising candidate. This preclinical study aimed therefore to test its antidepressant-like properties in mice and to decipher the underlying mechanisms by focusing on monoaminergic neurotransmission, due to its strong implication in mood disorders. For this purpose, the behavioral and neurobiochemical impact of a saffron extract, Safr’Inside™ (6.5 mg/kg per os) was measured in naïve mice. Saffron extract reduced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. This behavioral improvement was associated with neurobiological modifications, particularly changes in serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, suggesting that Safr’Inside™ may share common targets with conventional pharmacological antidepressants. This study provides useful information on the therapeutic relevance of nutritional interventions with saffron extracts to improve management of mood disorders. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Effect of Exogenous Beta-Hydroxybutyrate Salt Supplementation on Metrics of Safety and Health in Adolescents
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 854; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030854 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 572
Abstract
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low-carbohydrate, moderate-protein diet that will induce a state of ketosis, but because of its restrictive nature, it may be difficult to adhere to, especially in adolescents. Supplementing with exogenous beta-hydroxybutyrate salts may induce a state of [...] Read more.
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low-carbohydrate, moderate-protein diet that will induce a state of ketosis, but because of its restrictive nature, it may be difficult to adhere to, especially in adolescents. Supplementing with exogenous beta-hydroxybutyrate salts may induce a state of temporary ketosis without any undesirable side effects, thereby promoting the benefits of ketosis and minimizing adherence requirements to a ketogenic diet. To date, beta-hydroxybutyrate supplementation in healthy adolescents has not been explored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the safety of exogenous beta-hydroxybutyrate salt supplementation in a healthy adolescent population. In the present study, 22 healthy male and female adolescents consumed 3.75 g of beta-hydroxybutyrate salts or maltodextrin placebo twice daily for 90 days. Comprehensive blood safety analysis, bone densitometry, happiness and emotional intelligence surveys, and blood pressure were assessed at Pre, Day 45, and Day 90. There were no significant differences detected in subjects supplementing with beta-hydroxybutyrate salts, indicating that exogenous beta-hydroxybutyrate salts had no detrimental impact on fasting blood safety metrics, bone density, happiness, emotional intelligence, or blood pressure. We conclude that supplementing with exogenous beta-hydroxybutyrate salts is safe and well-tolerated by healthy adolescents. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Fish Hydrolysate Supplementation Containing n-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Peptides Prevents LPS-Induced Neuroinflammation
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 824; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030824 - 02 Mar 2021
Viewed by 745
Abstract
Neuroinflammation constitutes a normal part of the brain immune response orchestrated by microglial cells. However, a sustained and uncontrolled production of proinflammatory factors together with microglial activation contribute to the onset of a chronic low-grade inflammation, leading to neuronal damage and cognitive as [...] Read more.
Neuroinflammation constitutes a normal part of the brain immune response orchestrated by microglial cells. However, a sustained and uncontrolled production of proinflammatory factors together with microglial activation contribute to the onset of a chronic low-grade inflammation, leading to neuronal damage and cognitive as well as behavioral impairments. Hence, limiting brain inflammatory response and improving the resolution of inflammation could be particularly of interest to prevent these alterations. Dietary n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) and low molecular weight peptides are good candidates because of their immunomodulatory and proresolutive properties. These compounds are present in a fish hydrolysate derived from marine-derived byproducts. In this study, we compared the effect of an 18-day supplementation with this fish hydrolysate to a supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in mice. In response to peripherally injected LPS, the fish hydrolysate supplementation decreased the hippocampal mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p < 0.001), IL-1β (p = 0.0008) and TNF-α (p < 0.0001), whereas the DHA supplementation reduced only the expression of IL-6 (p = 0.004). This decline in proinflammatory cytokine expressions was associated with an increase in the protein expression of IκB (p = 0.014 and p = 0.0054 as compared to the DHA supplementation and control groups, respectively) and to a modulation of microglial activation markers in the hippocampus. The beneficial effects of the fish hydrolysate could be due in part to the switch of the hippocampal oxylipin profile towards a more anti-inflammatory profile as compared to the DHA supplementation. Thus, the valorization of fish byproducts seems very attractive to prevent and counteract neuroinflammation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Perinatal Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Brain Development, Role in Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1185; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041185 - 02 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1000
Abstract
n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential fatty acids that are provided by dietary intake. Growing evidence suggests that n-3 and n-6 PUFAs are paramount for brain functions. They constitute crucial elements of cellular membranes, especially in the brain. They are [...] Read more.
n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential fatty acids that are provided by dietary intake. Growing evidence suggests that n-3 and n-6 PUFAs are paramount for brain functions. They constitute crucial elements of cellular membranes, especially in the brain. They are the precursors of several metabolites with different effects on inflammation and neuron outgrowth. Overall, long-chain PUFAs accumulate in the offspring brain during the embryonic and post-natal periods. In this review, we discuss how they accumulate in the developing brain, considering the maternal dietary supply, the polymorphisms of genes involved in their metabolism, and the differences linked to gender. We also report the mechanisms linking their bioavailability in the developing brain, their transfer from the mother to the embryo through the placenta, and their role in brain development. In addition, data on the potential role of altered bioavailability of long-chain n-3 PUFAs in the etiologies of neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia, are reviewed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Effects of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation in the Prevention and Treatment of Depressive Disorders—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041070 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1104
Abstract
N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been suggested to affect depressive disorders. This review aims to determine the effect of n-3 PUFAs on depressive symptoms in people with or without diagnosed depression. Medline, PsycINFO, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were searched for randomized controlled [...] Read more.
N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been suggested to affect depressive disorders. This review aims to determine the effect of n-3 PUFAs on depressive symptoms in people with or without diagnosed depression. Medline, PsycINFO, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the association between n-3 PUFAs and depressive symptoms or disorders as outcomes. A random-effects meta-analysis of standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was performed. Twenty-five studies (7682 participants) were included. Our meta-analysis (20 studies) indicated that n-3 PUFA supplementation lowered depressive symptomology as compared with placebo: SMD = −0.34, 95% CI: −0.55, −0.12, I2 = 86%, n = 5836, but a possible publication bias cannot be ruled out. Subgroup analyses indicated no statistically significant difference by treatment duration of <12 vs. ≥12 weeks, presence of comorbidity, or severity of depressive symptoms. Nevertheless, beneficial effects were seen in the subgroups of studies with longer treatment duration and with no depression and mild to moderate depression. Subgroup analysis by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) dosage revealed differences in favor of the lower EPA dosage. Sensitivity analysis including studies with low risk of bias seems to confirm the overall result. Supplementation of n-3 PUFA appears to have a modest beneficial effect on depressive symptomology, although the quality of evidence is still insufficient. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop