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Effect of Dietary Intake on Uric Acid

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019) | Viewed by 39618

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Disease Study Center, University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy
Interests: cholesterol; hypertension; uric acid; cardiovascular risk factors; cardiovascular prevention
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Health, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: cognitive impairment; cardiovascular risk; nutrition; uric acid

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Guest Editor
Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Disease Study Center, University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy
Interests: nutraceuticals; nutrition; cholesterol; hypertension; uric acid; cardiovascular risk factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As you surely know, a growing amount of scientific literature support the role of serum uric acid as a risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases beyond gout. Serum uric acid seems to exert its negative effects as a risk factor for those diseases at level significantly lower than that associated with the risk of gout. On the other hand, moderately elevated serum uric acid levels seems to predict the development of other risk factors such as hypertension, impaired fasting glucose and dyslipidaemia. In this context, an attentive analysis of the dietary causes of an increase of serum uric acid and of dietary factors potentially reducing its levels becomes relevant to support a population preventive approach.

In this context, this Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Effect of Dietary Intakes on Uric Acid”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature, including systematic reviews and meta analyses. The proposed manuscripts should cover the effects of nutrients, foods, dietary patterns or dietary patterns on serum uric acid in preclinical and clinical models.

Prof. Dr. Claudio Borghi
Prof. Dr. Giovambattista Desideri
Dr. Arrigo F.G. Cicero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Serum uric acid
  • Dietary patterns
  • Dietary components
  • Dietary supplements/Nutraceuticals
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Insulin-resistance
  • Prevention

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 764 KiB  
Article
Arterial Stiffness, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Fruits Intake in a Rural Population Sample: Data from the Brisighella Heart Study
by Arrigo F.G. Cicero, Federica Fogacci, Giovambattista Desideri, Elisa Grandi, Elisabetta Rizzoli, Sergio D’Addato and Claudio Borghi
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2674; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112674 - 05 Nov 2019
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 3699
Abstract
Introduction: There is conflicting information linking fruit and fructose intake with cardiometabolic disorders. The main objective of our study was to evaluate the association between intake of fruits and sugar-sweetened beverages, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a non-invasive marker of arterial aging, [...] Read more.
Introduction: There is conflicting information linking fruit and fructose intake with cardiometabolic disorders. The main objective of our study was to evaluate the association between intake of fruits and sugar-sweetened beverages, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a non-invasive marker of arterial aging, in a large population sample. Methods: For this study, we selected four age and sex-matched subgroups from the last Brisighella Heart Study population survey, after exclusion of those in secondary prevention for cardiovascular diseases, affected by gout and moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease (defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min), and/or actively treated with direct vasodilating drugs (calcium-antagonists, alpha-blockers, nitrates). The remaining subjects were classified into four groups: (1) low fruit and low sugar-sweetened beverage intake (LFLB), (2) high fruit and low sugar-sweetened beverage intake (HFLB), (3) low fruit and high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (LFHB), (4) high fruit and high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (HFHB). Results: CfPWV was significantly elevated in subjects consuming a higher fructose load, particularly when it was derived from industrially sweetened beverages (pooled LFHB & HFHB: 9.6 ± 2.3 m/s; pooled LFLB & HFLB: 8.6 ± 2.3 m/s, p < 0.001). Moreover, the main predictors of cfPWV values were serum uric acid (B = 0.391, 95%CI 0.321–0.486, p = 0.001), fructose load from both fruits and sugar-sweetened beverages (B = 0.310, 95%CI 0.099–0.522, p = 0.004), triglycerides (B = 0.228, 95%CI 0.117–0.389, p = 0.018), fasting plasma glucose (B = 0.015, 95%CI 0.008–0.022, p < 0.001) and estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (B = −0.043, 95%CI −0.052–−0.035, p < 0.001). Conclusion: our data suggest that increased intake of fructose derived from industrial sweetened beverages, though not from fruits, is associated with higher pulse wave velocity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Dietary Intake on Uric Acid)
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10 pages, 833 KiB  
Article
Association of Adherence to The Mediterranean Diet with Urinary Factors Favoring Renal Lithiasis: Cross-Sectional Study of Overweight Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome
by Rafael M. Prieto, Adrian Rodriguez, Pilar Sanchis, Margalida Morey, Miquel Fiol, Felix Grases, Olga Castañer, Miguel A. Martínez-González, Jordi Salas-Salvadó and Dora Romaguera
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1708; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081708 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3350
Abstract
Our purpose was to study the relationship of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with urinary factors that favor the formation of renal calcium and uric acid stones in overweight and obese participants who had metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study examined 267 participants. [...] Read more.
Our purpose was to study the relationship of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with urinary factors that favor the formation of renal calcium and uric acid stones in overweight and obese participants who had metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study examined 267 participants. A well-known MedDiet score (range 0–9) was calculated for each patient, and patients were then categorized has having low (≤3), medium (4–5), or high (≥6) adherence to the MedDiet. Baseline characteristics and urinary parameters were also analyzed. High calcium salt urinary crystallization risk (CaUCR) and high uric acid urinary crystallization risk (UrUCR) were calculated from urinary parameters using pre-defined criteria. More than half of patients with MedDiet scores ≤3 had high UrUCR (55.4%) and high CaUCR (53.8%). In contrast, fewer patients with high adherence (≥6) to the MedDiet had high UrUCR (41.2%) and high CaUCR (29.4%). Relative to those with low adherence, individuals with high adherence had a prevalence ratio (PR) of 0.77 for a high UrUCR (95% CI: 0.46–1.12; p for trend: 0.069) and a PR of 0.51 for a high CaUCR (95% CI: 0.26–0.87; p for trend: 0.012) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, type 2 diabetes, and total energy intake. Our findings indicate that greater adherence to the MedDiet was associated with a reduced CaUCR and a reduced UrUCR. This suggests that adequate dietary management using the MedDiet patterns may prevent or reduce the incidence and recurrence of calcium salt and uric acid renal stones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Dietary Intake on Uric Acid)
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Review

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18 pages, 275 KiB  
Review
Dietary Antioxidant Supplements and Uric Acid in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Review
by Stefanos Roumeliotis, Athanasios Roumeliotis, Evangelia Dounousi, Theodoros Eleftheriadis and Vassilios Liakopoulos
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1911; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081911 - 15 Aug 2019
Cited by 74 | Viewed by 10290
Abstract
Increased serum levels of uric acid have been associated with the onset and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), cardiovascular disease, and mortality, through several molecular pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is present even in the early stages [...] Read more.
Increased serum levels of uric acid have been associated with the onset and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), cardiovascular disease, and mortality, through several molecular pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is present even in the early stages of CKD, progresses parallelly with the deterioration of kidney function, and is even more exacerbated in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Although acting in the plasma as an antioxidant, once uric acid enters the intracellular environment; it behaves as a powerful pro-oxidant. Exogenous intake of antioxidants has been repeatedly shown to prevent inflammation, atherosclerosis and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Moreover, certain antioxidants have been proposed to exert uric acid-lowering properties. This review aims to present the available data regarding the effects of antioxidant supplements on both oxidative stress and uric acid serum levels, in a population particularly susceptible to oxidative damage such as CKD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Dietary Intake on Uric Acid)
15 pages, 324 KiB  
Review
Uric Acid and Plant-Based Nutrition
by Boštjan Jakše, Barbara Jakše, Maja Pajek and Jernej Pajek
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1736; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081736 - 26 Jul 2019
Cited by 59 | Viewed by 21473
Abstract
Plant-based diets (PBDs) are associated with decreased risk of morbidity and mortality associated with important noncommunicable chronic diseases. Similar to animal-based food sources (e.g., meat, fish, and animal visceral organs), some plant-based food sources (e.g., certain soy legume products, sea vegetables, and brassica [...] Read more.
Plant-based diets (PBDs) are associated with decreased risk of morbidity and mortality associated with important noncommunicable chronic diseases. Similar to animal-based food sources (e.g., meat, fish, and animal visceral organs), some plant-based food sources (e.g., certain soy legume products, sea vegetables, and brassica vegetables) also contain a high purine load. Suboptimally designed PBDs might consequently be associated with increased uric acid levels and gout development. Here, we review the available data on this topic, with a great majority of studies showing reduced risk of hyperuricemia and gout with vegetarian (especially lacto-vegetarian) PBDs. Additionally, type of ingested purines, fiber, vitamin C, and certain lifestyle factors work in concordance to reduce uric acid generation in PBDs. Recent limited data show that even with an exclusive PBD, uric acid concentrations remain in the normal range in short- and long-term dieters. The reasonable consumption of plant foods with a higher purine content as a part of PBDs may therefore be safely tolerated in normouricemic individuals, but additional data is needed in hyperuricemic individuals, especially those with chronic kidney disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Dietary Intake on Uric Acid)
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