Special Issue "Collagen and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Daniel König
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Freiburg, Department for Nutrition, Institute for Sports and Sports Science, 79117 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
Interests: influence of aging and different nutrients on muscle, bones and tendons; effects of lifestyle intervention on obesity and the metabolic syndrome; antioxidants and oxidative damage; nutritional needs of athletes; fatty acids and lipoprotein metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increase in life expectancy in Western societies is accompanied by a higher prevalence of chronic diseases and care dependency. An important prerequisite for healthy aging is an active lifestyle and a well-balanced nutrition, which is, ideally, associated with an age-appropriate preservation of muscle mass and function, bone mass and joint function. In contrast, we experience an increase in sarcopenia, osteoporosis and chronic degenerative joint diseases, also in younger age. These factors are among the most important determinants influencing health and independence in the elderly. In addition, they are responsible for the development and aggravation of obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors.

Our knowledge on the importance of dietary proteins and a high protein content in daily nutrition for healthy aging has been constantly increasing. In the last decade, protein sources such as whey, soy or casein have been in the focus of research interest. However, most recent investigations have also reported on beneficial effects of collagen peptides in terms of improved muscle mass, body composition, enhanced bone formation, as well as joint stability and function. First evidence suggests that these effects could also be mediated by signaling functions of collagen peptides of different size, which have been measured in the blood stream following collagen peptides administration.

In this Special Issue we welcome original research (in vitro or in vivo; animal and human studies) and review articles concerning the effects of collagen peptides on issues such as:

Collagen peptides and body composition

Collagen peptides and bone metabolism/osteopopenia/osteoporosis

Collagen peptides and joint health (joint stability/joint pain, osteoarthrosis)

Collagen peptides and cell signaling (muscle, bone, fat, etc.)

Collagen peptides as protein source

Prof. Daniel König
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Collagen
  • Collagen peptides
  • Muscle mass
  • Body composition
  • Osteoporosis
  • Joint health
  • Mtor pathway
  • Healthy ageing

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Prolonged Collagen Peptide Supplementation and Resistance Exercise Training Affects Body Composition in Recreationally Active Men
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1154; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051154 - 23 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We aimed to determine the effects of long-term collagen peptide (CP) supplementation and resistance exercise training (RET) on body composition, strength, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area (fCSA) in recreationally active men. Fifty-seven young men were randomly and double-blinded divided into a group receiving [...] Read more.
We aimed to determine the effects of long-term collagen peptide (CP) supplementation and resistance exercise training (RET) on body composition, strength, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area (fCSA) in recreationally active men. Fifty-seven young men were randomly and double-blinded divided into a group receiving either collagen peptides (COL, 15 g/day) or a placebo (PLA). Strength testing, bioimpedance analysis, and muscle biopsies were used prior to and after an RET intervention. Food record protocols were performed during the RET intervention. The groups trained three times a week for 12 weeks. Baseline parameters showed no differences between groups, and the external training load and dietary food intake were also similar. COL showed a significant increase in fat-free mass (FFM) compared with the placebo group (p < 0.05). Body fat mass (BFM) was unchanged in COL, whereas a significant increase in BFM was observed in PLA. Both groups showed significant increases in all strength tests, with a trend for a slightly more pronounced effect in COL. The fCSA of type II muscle fibers increased significantly in both groups without differences between the two groups. We firstly demonstrated improved body composition in healthy, recreationally active men subsequent to prolonged CP supplementation in combination with RET. As the observed increase in FFM was not reflected in differences in fCSA hypertrophy between groups, we assume enhanced passive connective tissue adaptations in COL due to CP intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Significant Amounts of Functional Collagen Peptides Can Be Incorporated in the Diet While Maintaining Indispensable Amino Acid Balance
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1079; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051079 - 15 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The results of twenty years of research indicate that the inclusion of collagen peptides in the diet can lead to various improvements in health. According to the current protein quality evaluation method PDCAAS (Protein Digestibility-corrected Amino Acid Score), collagen protein lacks one indispensable [...] Read more.
The results of twenty years of research indicate that the inclusion of collagen peptides in the diet can lead to various improvements in health. According to the current protein quality evaluation method PDCAAS (Protein Digestibility-corrected Amino Acid Score), collagen protein lacks one indispensable amino acid (tryptophan) and is therefore categorized as an incomplete protein source. Collagen protein displays a low indispensable amino acid profile, yet as a functional food, collagen is a source of physiologically active peptides and conditionally indispensable amino acids that have the potential to optimize health and address physiological needs posed by aging and exercise. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum level of dietary collagen peptides that can be incorporated in the Western pattern diet while maintaining its indispensable amino acid balance. Iterative PDCAAS calculations showed that a level as high as 36% of collagen peptides can be used as protein substitution in the daily diet while ensuring indispensable amino acid requirements are met. This study suggests that the effective amounts of functional collagen peptides (2.5 to 15 g per day) observed in the literature are below the maximum level of collagen that may be incorporated in the standard American diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of 12 Weeks of Hypertrophy Resistance Exercise Training Combined with Collagen Peptide Supplementation on the Skeletal Muscle Proteome in Recreationally Active Men
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1072; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051072 - 14 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Evidence has shown that protein supplementation following resistance exercise training (RET) helps to further enhance muscle mass and strength. Studies have demonstrated that collagen peptides containing mostly non-essential amino acids increase fat-free mass (FFM) and strength in sarcopenic men. The aim of this [...] Read more.
Evidence has shown that protein supplementation following resistance exercise training (RET) helps to further enhance muscle mass and strength. Studies have demonstrated that collagen peptides containing mostly non-essential amino acids increase fat-free mass (FFM) and strength in sarcopenic men. The aim of this study was to investigate whether collagen peptide supplementation in combination with RET influences the protein composition of skeletal muscle. Twenty-five young men (age: 24.2 ± 2.6 years, body mass (BM): 79.6 ± 5.6 kg, height: 185.0 ± 5.0 cm, fat mass (FM): 11.5% ± 3.4%) completed body composition and strength measurements and vastus lateralis biopsies were taken before and after a 12-week training intervention. In a double-blind, randomized design, subjects consumed either 15 g of specific collagen peptides (COL) or a non-caloric placebo (PLA) every day within 60 min after their training session. A full-body hypertrophy workout was completed three times per week and included four exercises using barbells. Muscle proteome analysis was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). BM and FFM increased significantly in COL compared with PLA, whereas no differences in FM were detected between the two groups. Both groups improved in strength levels, with a slightly higher increase in COL compared with PLA. In COL, 221 higher abundant proteins were identified. In contrast, only 44 proteins were of higher abundance in PLA. In contrast to PLA, the upregulated proteins in COL were mostly associated with the protein metabolism of the contractile fibers. In conclusion, the use of RET in combination with collagen peptide supplementation results in a more pronounced increase in BM, FFM, and muscle strength than RET alone. More proteins were upregulated in the COL intervention most of which were associated with contractile fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Collagen Hydrolysate Enhances Postprandial Absorption Rate—A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051064 - 13 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Collagen is characterized by its high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline, and is found to exert beneficial effects on joint pain related to activity and osteoarthritis. However, to exert any beneficial effects it is essential that collagen is optimally absorbed. This study [...] Read more.
Collagen is characterized by its high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline, and is found to exert beneficial effects on joint pain related to activity and osteoarthritis. However, to exert any beneficial effects it is essential that collagen is optimally absorbed. This study aimed to investigate the postprandial absorption of collagen and elucidate the impact of an exogenous enzymatic hydrolysis on absorption rate and bioavailability. A randomized, blinded, cross-over study was conducted where ten healthy male subjects received either 35 g enzymatically hydrolyzed collagen protein (EHC), 35 g non-enzymatically hydrolyzed collagen protein (NC) or placebo (250 mL water) on three nonconsecutive days. Blood samples were drawn before, and up to 240 min following, ingestion and the blood metabolome was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. A significant increase in the plasma concentration of nearly all amino acids (AAs) was observed over a 240 min period for both EHC and NC. In addition, the absorption rate and bioavailability of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline were significantly higher for EHC (p < 0.05). In conclusion, ingestion of collagen hydrolysates increases postprandial plasma concentrations of AAs over a period of 240 min, and an enzymatic hydrolysis increases the absorption rate and bioavailability of the collagen-rich AAs glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Specific Collagen Peptides in Combination with Resistance Training Improve Body Composition and Regional Muscle Strength in Premenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 892; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040892 - 20 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise combined with supplementation of specific collagen peptides (SCP) on body composition and muscle strength in premenopausal women. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial 77 premenopausal women completed a 12-week resistance training (3 day/week) [...] Read more.
The aim was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise combined with supplementation of specific collagen peptides (SCP) on body composition and muscle strength in premenopausal women. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial 77 premenopausal women completed a 12-week resistance training (3 day/week) and ingested 15 g of SCP or placebo on a daily basis. Changes in body composition were determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and muscular strength by isometric strength testing. The treatment group (TG) significantly increased (p < 0.001) their percentage of fat-free mass. Although the control group (CG) also showed a significant (p < 0.01) gain in fat-free mass from pre- to post-training, the increase in the TG was significantly higher in an RMANOVA analysis (p < 0.05). Regarding the change in percentage body fat, a significant decline was observed in both TG (p < 0.001) and CG (p < 0.01), with a significantly higher reduction in the TG (p < 0.05). Subjects receiving 15 g of collagen peptides daily also showed a significantly higher gain in hand-grip strength compared to those performing resistance training only (p < 0.05). In both groups, the gain in leg strength (TG = p < 0.001; CG = p < 0.01) was significant after 12 weeks with a more pronounced effect in the treatment group. In conclusion, resistance training in combination with supplementation of SCP induced a significantly higher increase in fat-free mass and hand-grip strength than resistance training and placebo supplementation. In addition, there was a significantly higher loss in fat mass and a more pronounced increase in leg strength in the treatment group compared to the control group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Oral Supplementation of Specific Collagen Peptides Combined with Calf-Strengthening Exercises Enhances Function and Reduces Pain in Achilles Tendinopathy Patients
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010076 - 02 Jan 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
The current pilot study investigates whether oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides improves symptoms and tendon vascularisation in patients with chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy in combination with structured exercise. Participants were given a placebo or specific collagen peptides (TENDOFORTE®) in combination [...] Read more.
The current pilot study investigates whether oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides improves symptoms and tendon vascularisation in patients with chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy in combination with structured exercise. Participants were given a placebo or specific collagen peptides (TENDOFORTE®) in combination with a bi-daily calf-strengthening program for 6 months. Group AB received specific collagen peptides for the first 3 months before crossing over to placebo. Group BA received placebo first before crossing over to specific collagen peptides. At baseline (T1), 3 (T2) and 6 (T3) months, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment–Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaires and microvascularity measurements through contrast-enhanced ultrasound were obtained in 20 patients. Linear mixed modeling statistics showed that after 3 months, VISA-A increased significantly for group AB with 12.6 (9.7; 15.5), while in group BA VISA-A increased only by 5.3 (2.3; 8.3) points. After crossing over group AB and BA showed subsequently a significant increase in VISA-A of, respectively, 5.9 (2.8; 9.0) and 17.7 (14.6; 20.7). No adverse advents were reported. Microvascularity decreased in both groups to a similar extent and was moderately associated with VISA-A (Rc2:0.68). We conclude that oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides may accelerate the clinical benefits of a well-structured calf-strengthening and return-to-running program in Achilles tendinopathy patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Collagen Hydrolysates from Silver Carp Skin (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) on Osteoporosis in Chronologically Aged Mice: Increasing Bone Remodeling
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1434; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101434 - 04 Oct 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder in humans and gelatin hydrolysates from mammals have been reported to improve osteoporosis. In this study, 13-month-old mice were used to evaluate the effects of collagen hydrolysates (CHs) from silver carp skin on osteoporosis. No significant differences [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder in humans and gelatin hydrolysates from mammals have been reported to improve osteoporosis. In this study, 13-month-old mice were used to evaluate the effects of collagen hydrolysates (CHs) from silver carp skin on osteoporosis. No significant differences were observed in mice body weight, spleen or thymus indices after daily intake of antioxidant collagen hydrolysates (ACH; 200 mg/kg body weight (bw) (LACH), 400 mg/kg bw (MACH), 800 mg/kg bw (HACH)), collagenase hydrolyzed collagen hydrolysates (CCH) or proline (400 mg/kg body weight) for eight weeks, respectively. ACH tended to improve bone mineral density, increase bone hydroxyproline content, enhance alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level and reduce tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP-5b) activity in serum, with significant differences observed between the MACH and model groups (p < 0.05). ACH exerted a better effect on osteoporosis than CCH at the identical dose, whereas proline had no significant effect on repairing osteoporosis compared to the model group. Western blotting results demonstrated that CHs mainly increased bone remodeling by stimulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad signaling pathway and improving the interaction between collagen and α2β1 integrin. The results indicated that CHs from fish could be applied to alleviate osteoporosis or treat bone loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen and Human Health)
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