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Special Issue "Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dirkjan van Schaardenburg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center| Reade and Amsterdam University Medical Center, NL-1040 HG Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: the early and preclinical phases of rheumatoid arthritis; including biomarkers; risk factors; and early interventions; combined life style interventions for chronic diseases
Prof. Dr. Willem Lems
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center| Reade, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis; healthy diet and a nonsedentary life style for rheumatic or musculoskeletal diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is the purpose of this Special Issue to highlight the role of nutrition (including supplements) in the pathogenesis and treatment of major rheumatic diseases. It is becoming increasingly clear that most modern chronic diseases including rheumatic inflammatory diseases may have a long prodromal “incubation” period, during which genetic and environmental factors interact, ultimately producing clinical diseases. Common risk factors for such diseases are airway inflammation by dust or smoking; physical inactivity; posttraumatic or chronic stress; and an unhealthy diet high in refined carbohydrates and processed meat, with a high ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats and low in fiber and minerals. A common pathway to disease promoted by such a dietary pattern seems to be a state of chronic low grade inflammation, which is largely asymptomatic although often associated with reduced vitality. However, the question remains: how strong are these relations, and can we achieve clinically meaningful results by encouraging patients to adopt a healthier diet and life style?

Prof. Dr. Dirkjan van Schaardenburg
Prof. Dr. Willem Lems
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Nutrition
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Gout
  • Osteoporosis
  • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Spondyloarthritis
  • Low grade inflammation
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Microbiome
  • Fibre
  • Dairy
  • Vegan
  • Mediterranean diet
  • Vitamin D
  • Exercises

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Consumption of Meat and Dairy Products Is Not Associated with the Risk for Rheumatoid Arthritis among Women: A Population-Based Cohort Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2825; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112825 - 19 Nov 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1968
Abstract
Diet has gained attention as a risk factor for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially with regards to food of animal origin, such as meat and dairy products. By using data from national patient registers and dietary data from a large prospective [...] Read more.
Diet has gained attention as a risk factor for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially with regards to food of animal origin, such as meat and dairy products. By using data from national patient registers and dietary data from a large prospective population cohort, the Swedish Mammography Cohort, we aimed to investigate whether the consumption of meat and dairy products had any impact on the risk of subsequent development of RA. During 12 years of follow-up (January 2003–December 2014; 381, 456 person-years), 368 patients with a new diagnosis of RA were identified. No associations between the development of RA and the consumption of meat and meat products (hazard ratio [HR] for the fully adjusted model: 1.08 [95% CI: 0.77–1.53]) or the total consumption of milk and dairy products (HR for the fully adjusted model: 1.09 [95% CI: 0.76–1.55]) were observed. In conclusion, in this large prospective cohort of women, no associations were observed between dietary intake of meat and dairy products and the risk of RA development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
Article
The Role of Dietary Fiber in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Feasibility Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2392; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102392 - 07 Oct 2019
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 3674
Abstract
Short-chain fatty acids are microbial metabolites that have been shown to be key regulators of the gut–joint axis in animal models. In humans, microbial dysbiosis was observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as in those at-risk to develop RA, and is [...] Read more.
Short-chain fatty acids are microbial metabolites that have been shown to be key regulators of the gut–joint axis in animal models. In humans, microbial dysbiosis was observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as in those at-risk to develop RA, and is thought to be an environmental trigger for the development of clinical disease. At the same time, diet has a proven impact on maintaining intestinal microbial homeostasis. Given this association, we performed a feasibility study in RA patients using high-fiber dietary supplementation with the objective to restore microbial homeostasis and promote the secretion of beneficial immunomodulatory microbial metabolites. RA patients (n = 36) under routine care received daily high-fiber bars or cereals for 28 days. Clinical assessments and laboratory analysis of immune parameters in blood and stool samples from RA patients were done before and after the high-fiber dietary supplementation. We observed an increase in circulating regulatory T cell numbers, favorable Th1/Th17 ratios, as well as decreased markers of bone erosion in RA patients after 28 days of dietary intervention. Furthermore, patient-related outcomes of RA improved. Based on these results, we conclude that controlled clinical studies of high-fiber dietary interventions could be a viable approach to supplement or complement current pharmacological treatment strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
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Article
Chondroprotective Effects of Genistein against Osteoarthritis Induced Joint Inflammation
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051180 - 27 May 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 1720
Abstract
Genistein is an isoflavone extracted from soybean (Glycine max). This compound has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-cancer effects; however, the mechanism underlying the effects of genistein on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains unknown. Our objectives in this study were to explore the anti-inflammatory [...] Read more.
Genistein is an isoflavone extracted from soybean (Glycine max). This compound has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-cancer effects; however, the mechanism underlying the effects of genistein on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains unknown. Our objectives in this study were to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of genistein on IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes and to investigate the potential mechanisms which underlie them. Our results from an in-vitro model of osteoarthritis indicate that genistein inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of the catabolic factors nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Genistein was shown to stimulate Ho-1 expression, which has been associated with Nrf-2 pathway activation in human chondrocytes. In a rat model, genistein was also shown to attenuate the progression of traumatic osteoarthritis. Taken together, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of genistein in mediating the inflammation associated with joint disorders. Our results also indicate that genistein could potentially serve as an alternative therapeutic treatment for OA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
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Review

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Review
Dietary Habits and Nutrition in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can Diet Influence Disease Development and Clinical Manifestations?
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1456; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051456 - 18 May 2020
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 5293
Abstract
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, autoimmune disease characterized by joint involvement, with progressive cartilage and bone destruction. Genetic and environmental factors determine RA susceptibility. In recent years, an increasing number of studies suggested that diet has a central role in disease risk [...] Read more.
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, autoimmune disease characterized by joint involvement, with progressive cartilage and bone destruction. Genetic and environmental factors determine RA susceptibility. In recent years, an increasing number of studies suggested that diet has a central role in disease risk and progression. Several nutrients, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, present anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, featuring a protective role for RA development, while others such as red meat and salt have a harmful effect. Gut microbiota alteration and body composition modifications are indirect mechanisms of how diet influences RA onset and progression. Possible protective effects of some dietary patterns and supplements, such as the Mediterranean Diet (MD), vitamin D and probiotics, could be a possible future adjunctive therapy to standard RA treatment. Therefore, a healthy lifestyle and nutrition have to be encouraged in patients with RA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
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Review
Human Postprandial Nutrient Metabolism and Low-Grade Inflammation: A Narrative Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 3000; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123000 - 07 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2874
Abstract
The importance of the postprandial state has been acknowledged, since hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are linked with several chronic systemic low-grade inflammation conditions. Humans spend more than 16 h per day in the postprandial state and the postprandial state is acknowledged as a complex [...] Read more.
The importance of the postprandial state has been acknowledged, since hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are linked with several chronic systemic low-grade inflammation conditions. Humans spend more than 16 h per day in the postprandial state and the postprandial state is acknowledged as a complex interplay between nutrients, hormones and diet-derived metabolites. The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the physiology of the postprandial inflammatory response, the role of different nutrients, the pro-inflammatory effects of metabolic endotoxemia and the anti-inflammatory effects of bile acids. Moreover, we discuss nutritional strategies that may be linked to the described pathways to modulate the inflammatory component of the postprandial response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
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Review
Dietary Interventions for Gout and Effect on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2955; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122955 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3482
Abstract
Gout is one of the most prevalent inflammatory rheumatic disease. It is preceded by hyperuricemia and associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, both related to unhealthy diets. The objective of this systematic review is to better define the most appropriate diet [...] Read more.
Gout is one of the most prevalent inflammatory rheumatic disease. It is preceded by hyperuricemia and associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, both related to unhealthy diets. The objective of this systematic review is to better define the most appropriate diet addressing both disease activity and traditional cardiovascular risk factors in hyperuricemic patients. We included clinical trials with patients diagnosed with hyperuricemia or gout, investigating the effect of dietary interventions on serum uric acid (SUA) levels, gout flares and—if available—cardiovascular risk factors. Eighteen articles were included, which were too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis. Overall, the risk of bias of the studies was moderate to high. We distinguished four groups of dietary interventions: Calorie restriction and fasting, purine-low diets, Mediterranean-style diets, and supplements. Overall, fasting resulted in an increase of SUA, whilst small (SUA change +0.3 to −2.9 mg/dL) but significant effects were found after low-calorie, purine-low, and Mediterranean-style diets. Studies investigating the effect on cardiovascular risk factors were limited and inconclusive. Since Mediterranean-style diets/DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) have shown to be effective for the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in other at-risk populations, we recommend further investigation of such diets for the treatment of gout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
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