Next Article in Journal
Food Components and Dietary Habits: Keys for a Healthy Gut Microbiota Composition
Previous Article in Journal
Validity of a Food and Fluid Exercise Questionnaire for Macronutrient Intake during Exercise against Observations
Previous Article in Special Issue
Chondroprotective Effects of Genistein against Osteoarthritis Induced Joint Inflammation
Open AccessArticle

The Role of Dietary Fiber in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Feasibility Study

1
Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University (FAU) Erlangen-Nürnberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2
Melio.Care GmbH, 91080 Marloffstein, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2392; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102392
Received: 29 August 2019 / Revised: 23 September 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 7 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
Short-chain fatty acids are microbial metabolites that have been shown to be key regulators of the gut–joint axis in animal models. In humans, microbial dysbiosis was observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as in those at-risk to develop RA, and is thought to be an environmental trigger for the development of clinical disease. At the same time, diet has a proven impact on maintaining intestinal microbial homeostasis. Given this association, we performed a feasibility study in RA patients using high-fiber dietary supplementation with the objective to restore microbial homeostasis and promote the secretion of beneficial immunomodulatory microbial metabolites. RA patients (n = 36) under routine care received daily high-fiber bars or cereals for 28 days. Clinical assessments and laboratory analysis of immune parameters in blood and stool samples from RA patients were done before and after the high-fiber dietary supplementation. We observed an increase in circulating regulatory T cell numbers, favorable Th1/Th17 ratios, as well as decreased markers of bone erosion in RA patients after 28 days of dietary intervention. Furthermore, patient-related outcomes of RA improved. Based on these results, we conclude that controlled clinical studies of high-fiber dietary interventions could be a viable approach to supplement or complement current pharmacological treatment strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-fiber diet (HFD); short chain fatty acids (SCFA); rheumatoid arthritis (RA); gut–joint axis; microbiota high-fiber diet (HFD); short chain fatty acids (SCFA); rheumatoid arthritis (RA); gut–joint axis; microbiota
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Häger, J.; Bang, H.; Hagen, M.; Frech, M.; Träger, P.; Sokolova, M.V.; Steffen, U.; Tascilar, K.; Sarter, K.; Schett, G.; Rech, J.; Zaiss, M.M. The Role of Dietary Fiber in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Feasibility Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2392.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop