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Open AccessReview

Dietary Interventions for Gout and Effect on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Systematic Review

1
Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center|Reade, 1056 AB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Amsterdam UMC|Amsterdam Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Medical Library, Vrije Universiteit, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Amsterdam UMC|VU Medical Center, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2955; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122955
Received: 15 October 2019 / Revised: 26 November 2019 / Accepted: 28 November 2019 / Published: 4 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthritis and Nutrition: Can Food Be Medicine?)
Gout is one of the most prevalent inflammatory rheumatic disease. It is preceded by hyperuricemia and associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, both related to unhealthy diets. The objective of this systematic review is to better define the most appropriate diet addressing both disease activity and traditional cardiovascular risk factors in hyperuricemic patients. We included clinical trials with patients diagnosed with hyperuricemia or gout, investigating the effect of dietary interventions on serum uric acid (SUA) levels, gout flares and—if available—cardiovascular risk factors. Eighteen articles were included, which were too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis. Overall, the risk of bias of the studies was moderate to high. We distinguished four groups of dietary interventions: Calorie restriction and fasting, purine-low diets, Mediterranean-style diets, and supplements. Overall, fasting resulted in an increase of SUA, whilst small (SUA change +0.3 to −2.9 mg/dL) but significant effects were found after low-calorie, purine-low, and Mediterranean-style diets. Studies investigating the effect on cardiovascular risk factors were limited and inconclusive. Since Mediterranean-style diets/DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) have shown to be effective for the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in other at-risk populations, we recommend further investigation of such diets for the treatment of gout. View Full-Text
Keywords: gout; hyperuricemia; cardiovascular disease; metabolic syndrome x; diet; purine low diet; Mediterranean diet; DASH; cholesterol; blood pressure gout; hyperuricemia; cardiovascular disease; metabolic syndrome x; diet; purine low diet; Mediterranean diet; DASH; cholesterol; blood pressure
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Vedder, D.; Walrabenstein, W.; Heslinga, M.; de Vries, R.; Nurmohamed, M.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Gerritsen, M. Dietary Interventions for Gout and Effect on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2955.

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