Special Issue "Dietary Potassium and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rachael McLean
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Tel. +64 3 479 9428
Interests: Diet, cardiovascular disease and risk factors for cardiovascular disease; dietary sodium and potassium—measurement in individuals and populations, and public health strategies to increase potassium intake and reduce sodium intake and optimize nutrition.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary potassium is associated with positive health outcomes, including lowered blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease (particularly stroke and myocardial infarction). Despite remarkably consistent dietary recommendations around the world, many populations consume less potassium than is recommended. Fruit and vegetables are important sources of dietary potassium and have other health benefits including dietary fiber. Research to inform the measurement of dietary potassium intake in individuals and populations, and interventions to increase potassium and fruit and vegetable intake is needed, as is further research on the relationship between potassium and sodium intakes and a variety of health and disease-related outcomes. This Special Issue on “Dietary Potassium and Human Health” aims to further our understanding of this important issue, and welcomes a range of submissions from the mechanistic to those focusing on population-level interventions.

Dr. Rachael McLean
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Potassium
  • Salt
  • Sodium
  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Nutrition
  • Prevention
  • Population
  • Dietary assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Intake and Sources of Potassium in a Cross-Sectional Study of Australian Adults
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2996; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122996 - 06 Dec 2019
Abstract
A diet rich in potassium is important to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study assessed potassium intake; food sources of potassium (including NOVA level of processing, purchase origin of these foods); and sodium-to-potassium ratio (Na:K) in a cross-section of Australian adults. [...] Read more.
A diet rich in potassium is important to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study assessed potassium intake; food sources of potassium (including NOVA level of processing, purchase origin of these foods); and sodium-to-potassium ratio (Na:K) in a cross-section of Australian adults. Data collection included 24-h urines (n = 338) and a 24-h diet recall (subsample n = 142). The mean (SD) age of participants was 41.2 (13.9) years and 56% were females. Mean potassium (95%CI) 24-h urinary excretion was 76.8 (73.0–80.5) mmol/day compared to 92.9 (86.6–99.1) by 24-h diet recall. Na:K was 1.9 (1.8–2.0) from the urine excretion and 1.4 (1.2–1.7) from diet recall. Foods contributing most to potassium were potatoes (8%), dairy milk (6%), dishes where cereal is the main ingredient (6%) and coffee/coffee substitutes (5%). Over half of potassium (56%) came from minimally processed foods, with 22% from processed and 22% from ultraprocessed foods. Almost two-thirds of potassium consumed was from foods purchased from food stores (58%), then food service sector (15%), and fresh food markets (13%). Overall, potassium levels were lower than recommended to reduce chronic disease risk. Multifaceted efforts are required for population-wide intervention—aimed at increasing fruit, vegetable, and other key sources of potassium intake; reducing consumption of processed foods; and working in supermarket/food service sector settings to improve the healthiness of foods available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Potassium and Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of 24-h Diet Records, 24-h Urine, and Duplicate Diets for Estimating Dietary Intakes of Potassium, Sodium, and Iodine in Children
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2927; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122927 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Accurately estimating nutrient intake can be challenging, yet it is important for informing policy. This cross-sectional validation study compared the use of three methods for estimating the intake of sodium, potassium, and iodine in children aged 9–11 years in New Zealand. Over the [...] Read more.
Accurately estimating nutrient intake can be challenging, yet it is important for informing policy. This cross-sectional validation study compared the use of three methods for estimating the intake of sodium, potassium, and iodine in children aged 9–11 years in New Zealand. Over the same 24 hour period, participants collected duplicate diets (n = 37), weighed food records (n = 84), and 24 hour urine samples (n = 82). Important differences were found between dietary estimates of sodium, potassium, and iodine using the three methods of dietary assessment, suggesting that different methods of assessment have specific limitations for the measurement of these nutrients in children. Bland Altman plots show relatively wide limits of agreement for all measures and nutrients. These results support the World Health Organization’s (WHOs) recommendations to use urinary assessment to measure population sodium and iodine intake, while dietary assessment appears to be more accurate for estimating potassium intake. Compared to reference values, our results suggest that the children in this study consume inadequate iodine, inadequate potassium, and excess dietary sodium. Public health measures to reduce sodium intake, increase intake of fruit and vegetables, and iodine-rich foods are warranted in New Zealand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Potassium and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Food Sources of Potassium in the Average Polish Diet
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2905; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122905 - 01 Dec 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify the food sources of potassium in the average Polish diet based on the data from the 2016 Household Budget Survey conducted on the representative sample of the Polish population (36,886 households, n = 99,230). This [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to identify the food sources of potassium in the average Polish diet based on the data from the 2016 Household Budget Survey conducted on the representative sample of the Polish population (36,886 households, n = 99,230). This survey is organized by the Central Statistical Office and is related to the expenditures, quantitative consumption and revenues in households. We analyzed 91 sub-groups (i.e., milk, red meat) from 13 food categories (i.e., milk and dairy products, meat and products). Our findings indicated that the daily supply of potassium in the average Polish diet was 2617.9 mg, which meant covering the average allowance in 83%. Vegetables provided 32.5% of potassium, of which potatoes accounted for 16.2% of supply, and other vegetables for 16.2%. Tomatoes as well as other vegetables and mushrooms provided a total of 8.2% of potassium among vegetables. The next position was taken by the meat and meat products category (17.7%), with the largest share of meat products (6.7%) and red meat (5.2%). Cereal products supplied 16.64% of potassium, of which bread, rolls and bread products (12.2%) were of the greatest importance. Milk and dairy products turned out to be the fourth product category as a source of potassium (11.9%), with the highest share of milk (6.8%) and yoghurts and milk drinks (3.9%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Potassium and Human Health)
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