Special Issue "Nutrition for Gestational Diabetes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Clive J. Petry
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Paediatrics, Box 116, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
Tel. +44(0)-1223-762945
Interests: gestational diabetes, fetal growth, pregnancy, metabolism, imprinted genes, biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common adverse medical conditions that occurs during pregnancy, and its prevalence is rising as part of a diabetes pandemic. Nutrition plays a key role in  GDM, whether (1) as part of an ‘unhealthy’ diet, which contributes to its cause, or (2) as part of changes in dietary intake, which act as the frontline treatment for GDM (sometimes supplemented with exercise and pharmacological intervention). Dietary changes, therefore, can alter the risk of developing GDM in the first place, and once GDM has emerged during pregnancy, dietary changes can mitigate the risk of developing GDM-related complications, such as macrosomia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia and jaundice in the neonate, pre‑eclampsia, increased need for caesarean section and placental abruption in the mother. In this Special Issue, we aim to highlight the role of nutrition in the aetiology of GDM, whether directly or indirectly through weight gain and obesity, and in its role as a GDM treatment to lower hyperglycemia and the risk of the aforementioned complications.

Dr. Clive J. Petry
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • diabetes
  • pregnancy
  • carbohydrate
  • glycemic index
  • fat
  • protein
  • fiber
  • vitamins
  • epidemiology
  • treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Temporal Trends in Maternal Food Intake Frequencies and Associations with Gestational Diabetes: The Cambridge Baby Growth Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2822; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112822 - 19 Nov 2019
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that in the first decade of this century the incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM) in pregnancy rose worldwide. In the Cambridge Baby Growth Study cohort we observed that this temporal trend was associated with an index of multiple deprivation [...] Read more.
Previous studies have suggested that in the first decade of this century the incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM) in pregnancy rose worldwide. In the Cambridge Baby Growth Study cohort we observed that this temporal trend was associated with an index of multiple deprivation and reductions in indices of insulin secretion. Deprivation level was not directly associated with GDM, suggesting that the temporal trend may relate more to other factors linked to it, such as dietary composition. In this study we investigated temporal trends in perceived food intake frequencies, derived from a qualitative, short questionnaire, in 865 pregnant Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS) recruits. A number of food frequency ranks showed both temporal trends and associations with GDM, but of note is the frequency of egg consumption (negative temporal trend p = 0.03, slope = −6.2 ranks/year; negative association with GDM p = 3.0 × 10−8, slope = −0.002 increased risk/rank) as it was also positively associated with the insulin disposition index (p = 1.17 × 10−3, slope = 0.42 ranks. L/mmoL). These results are consistent with a potential protective effect of factors related to the frequency of egg consumption in pregnancy. Such factors may have contributed to the observed temporal trend in GDM risk but the overall detectable effect appears to have been small. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Gestational Diabetes)
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Open AccessArticle
Ketonuria Is Associated with Changes to the Abundance of Roseburia in the Gut Microbiota of Overweight and Obese Women at 16 Weeks Gestation: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1836; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081836 - 08 Aug 2019
Abstract
The gut microbiome in pregnancy has been associated with various maternal metabolic and hormonal markers involved in glucose metabolism. Maternal ketones are of particular interest due to the rise in popularity of low-carbohydrate diets. We assessed for differences in the composition of the [...] Read more.
The gut microbiome in pregnancy has been associated with various maternal metabolic and hormonal markers involved in glucose metabolism. Maternal ketones are of particular interest due to the rise in popularity of low-carbohydrate diets. We assessed for differences in the composition of the gut microbiota in pregnant women with and without ketonuria at 16 weeks gestation. Fecal samples were obtained from 11 women with fasting ketonuria and 11 matched controls. The samples were analyzed to assess for differences in gut microbiota composition by 16S rRNA sequencing. Supervised hierarchical clustering analysis showed significantly different beta-diversity between women with and without ketonuria, but no difference in the alpha-diversity. Group comparisons and network analysis showed that ketonuria was associated with an increased abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Roseburia. The bacteria that contributed the most to the differences in the composition of the gut microbiota included Roseburia, Methanobrevibacter, Uncl. RF39, and Dialister in women with ketonuria and Eggerthella, Phascolarctobacterium, Butyricimonas, and Uncl. Coriobacteriaceae in women without ketonuria. This study found that the genus Roseburia is more abundant in the gut microbiota of pregnant women with ketonuria. Roseburia is a butyrate producing bacterium and may increase serum ketone levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Gestational Diabetes)
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