Special Issue "Nutraceutical Supplements in Heart Failure"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Mollace
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Campus Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
Interests: nutraceuticals; heart failure; endothelial dysfunction; metabolic syndrome
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heart failure (HF) is a multifactorial disease with a prevalence of 1–2% in the global population. Co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, or dyslipidemia are frequently associated with the occurrence of HF, thereby increasing the prevalence of the disease and the rate of hospitalization and mortality. In addition, ageing is affecting the number of patients undergoing HF, as the prevalence of the disease rises to 10% in people aged >70 years. Better management of risk factors and more substantial pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment according to recent guidelines have significantly reduced the impact of HF and its consequences. In particular, recent data showed that all-cause mortality prevalence at 12 months for hospitalized and stable/ambulatory HF patients were 17% and 7%, respectively, and the 12-month hospitalization rates were 44% and 32%, respectively. Thus, several relevant outcomes of HF still remain unsatisfactory, and further improvements to the impact of the disease have to be taken into account while considering the overall approach to the management of the disease. Although preliminary evidence suggests that HF is associated with an increased deficiency of micronutrients and that nutraceuticals supply could be beneficial in treating patients undergoing failing myocardium, limited evidence supporting the benefits of nutraceuticals for patients with HF has been found in recent studies and meta-analyses.

The present Special Issue aims to collect contributions in this field in order to:

  1. Identify a pathophysiological basis for nutraceutical supplementation at the early stages of cardiomyocyte dysfunction;
  2. Optimize the nutraceutical supplementation process based on specific targets of myocardial dysfunction, in both animal models of HF and patients, with ejection fraction either preserved or compromised;
  3. Promote and design clinical trials in order to verify, by means of an approach from “trees to bedside” , the efficacy and safety of nutraceutical supplementation in HF.

Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Mollace
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Heart failure
  • Pathophysiology
  • Cardiomyocyte dysfunction
  • Micronutrients
  • Nutraceutical supplementation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
The Potential Properties of Natural Compounds in Cardiac Stem Cell Activation: Their Role in Myocardial Regeneration
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010275 - 19 Jan 2021
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which include congenital heart disease, rhythm disorders, subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and many other cardiac disorders, cause about 30% of deaths globally; representing one of the main health problems worldwide. Among CVDs, ischemic heart diseases (IHDs) are one of [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which include congenital heart disease, rhythm disorders, subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and many other cardiac disorders, cause about 30% of deaths globally; representing one of the main health problems worldwide. Among CVDs, ischemic heart diseases (IHDs) are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The onset of IHDs is essentially due to an unbalance between the metabolic demands of the myocardium and its supply of oxygen and nutrients, coupled with a low regenerative capacity of the heart, which leads to great cardiomyocyte (CM) loss; promoting heart failure (HF) and myocardial infarction (MI). To date, the first strategy recommended to avoid IHDs is prevention in order to reduce the underlying risk factors. In the management of IHDs, traditional therapeutic options are widely used to improve symptoms, attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, and reduce early mortality rate. However, there are no available treatments that aim to improve cardiac performance by replacing the irreversible damaged cardiomyocytes (CMs). Currently, heart transplantation is the only treatment being carried out for irreversibly damaged CMs. Hence, the discovery of new therapeutic options seems to be necessary. Interestingly, recent experimental evidence suggests that regenerative stem cell medicine could be a useful therapeutic approach to counteract cardiac damage and promote tissue regeneration. To this end, researchers are tasked with answering one main question: how can myocardial regeneration be stimulated? In this regard, natural compounds from plant extracts seem to play a particularly promising role. The present review will summarize the recent advances in our knowledge of stem cell therapy in the management of CVDs; focusing on the main properties and potential mechanisms of natural compounds in stimulating and activating stem cells for myocardial regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical Supplements in Heart Failure)
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Open AccessReview
Pathophysiological Basis for Nutraceutical Supplementation in Heart Failure: A Comprehensive Review
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010257 - 17 Jan 2021
Abstract
There is evidence demonstrating that heart failure (HF) occurs in 1–2% of the global population and is often accompanied by comorbidities which contribute to increasing the prevalence of the disease, the rate of hospitalization and the mortality. Although recent advances in both pharmacological [...] Read more.
There is evidence demonstrating that heart failure (HF) occurs in 1–2% of the global population and is often accompanied by comorbidities which contribute to increasing the prevalence of the disease, the rate of hospitalization and the mortality. Although recent advances in both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches have led to a significant improvement in clinical outcomes in patients affected by HF, residual unmet needs remain, mostly related to the occurrence of poorly defined strategies in the early stages of myocardial dysfunction. Nutritional support in patients developing HF and nutraceutical supplementation have recently been shown to possibly contribute to protection of the failing myocardium, although their place in the treatment of HF requires further assessment, in order to find better therapeutic solutions. In this context, the Optimal Nutraceutical Supplementation in Heart Failure (ONUS-HF) working group aimed to assess the optimal nutraceutical approach to HF in the early phases of the disease, in order to counteract selected pathways that are imbalanced in the failing myocardium. In particular, we reviewed several of the most relevant pathophysiological and molecular changes occurring during the early stages of myocardial dysfunction. These include mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum stress, insufficient nitric oxide (NO) release, impaired cardiac stem cell mobilization and an imbalanced regulation of metalloproteinases. Moreover, we reviewed the potential of the nutraceutical supplementation of several natural products, such as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a grape seed extract, Olea Europea L.-related antioxidants, a sodium–glucose cotransporter (SGLT2) inhibitor-rich apple extract and a bergamot polyphenolic fraction, in addition to their support in cardiomyocyte protection, in HF. Such an approach should contribute to optimising the use of nutraceuticals in HF, and the effect needs to be confirmed by means of more targeted clinical trials exploring the efficacy and safety of these compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceutical Supplements in Heart Failure)
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