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Special Issue "Egg Intake and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria Luz Fernandez

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 860-486-5547
Interests: lipoprotein metabolism; functional foods; eggs; metabolic syndrome; diabetes
Guest Editor
Dr. Christopher Blesso

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 860-486-9049
Fax: 860-486-3674
Interests: Sphingolipids, Phospholipids, Cholesterol, Lipoproteins, Obesity, Inflammation, HDL, Polyphenols, Anthocyanins, Atherosclerosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary guidelines in many countries including the United States do not have an upper limit for dietary cholesterol, indicating that cholesterol is no longer considered a risk factor for heart disease. It is well-known that eggs are a good source of dietary cholesterol, which still causes uncertainty among the general public. Now, that we know that dietary cholesterol is not a concern, it is very important to focus on the health benefits of eggs. The intent of this special issue is to focus on the nutritional benefits of eggs. Eggs are good sources of Vitamin D, Vitamin E and selenium. They also contain very potent antioxidants, the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, which also protect against age-related macular degeneration. Eggs are also a good source of choline, which has a major role in neural development, and has been shown to protect against cognitive impairment, neural defects and fatty liver. In addition, egg protein has all the essential amino acids and has been shown to protect against sarcopenia in the elderly and protect children against kwashiorkor in underdeveloped countries. This Special Issue welcomes cell studies, animal studies and mostly clinical trials or epidemiological evidence that support the health benefits of eggs.

Prof. Maria Luz Fernandez
Prof. Christopher Blesso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eggs
  • lutein
  • Zeaxanthin
  • Egg protein

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Dietary Cholesterol Contained in Whole Eggs Is Not Well Absorbed and Does Not Acutely Affect Plasma Total Cholesterol Concentration in Men and Women: Results from 2 Randomized Controlled Crossover Studies
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1272; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091272
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 9 September 2018
PDF Full-text (1928 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Whole egg is a food source of dietary cholesterol and inconsistent research findings exist about the effect of dietary cholesterol from whole egg on blood cholesterol concentration. We assessed the effect of co-consuming cooked whole egg (CWE) on dietary cholesterol absorption from two
[...] Read more.
Whole egg is a food source of dietary cholesterol and inconsistent research findings exist about the effect of dietary cholesterol from whole egg on blood cholesterol concentration. We assessed the effect of co-consuming cooked whole egg (CWE) on dietary cholesterol absorption from two randomized-crossover studies. For study 1, 16 men consumed raw vegetables with no egg, 75 g CWE, or 150 g CWE. For study 2, 17 women consumed cooked vegetables with no egg or 100 g CWE. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein fractions (TRL) were isolated from collected blood. In study 1, total-cholesterol areas under the curve (AUC)0–10h in TRL were not different but triacylglycerol AUC0–10h in TRL was greater for 150 g CWE vs. 75 g CWE and no egg. Similarly, in study 2, total-cholesterol AUC0–10h in TRL was not different but triacylglycerol AUC0–10h in TRL was greater for 100 g CWE vs. no egg. In both studies, whole egg consumption did not affect plasma total-cholesterol AUC0–10h, while triacylglycerol AUC0–10h was increased. These results suggest that the dietary cholesterol in whole egg was not well absorbed, which may provide mechanistic insight for why it does not acutely influence plasma total-cholesterol concentration and is not associated with longer-term plasma cholesterol control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Egg Intake and Human Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Effects of a High-Protein Diet Including Whole Eggs on Muscle Composition and Indices of Cardiometabolic Health and Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults with Overweight or Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 946; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070946
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (875 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Age-related increases in intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) impair muscle quality, decrease functional capacity, and promote several cardiometabolic and inflammatory disorders. Whether these age-related alterations in muscle composition improve by consuming a high-protein (HP) diet with whole eggs are unclear. This parallel-design, randomized-controlled trial
[...] Read more.
Age-related increases in intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) impair muscle quality, decrease functional capacity, and promote several cardiometabolic and inflammatory disorders. Whether these age-related alterations in muscle composition improve by consuming a high-protein (HP) diet with whole eggs are unclear. This parallel-design, randomized-controlled trial assessed the effects of a 12-week eucaloric HP diet with three whole eggs per day (1.4 g protein kg−1 day−1) versus a normal-protein diet void of eggs (NP, 0.8 g protein kg−1 day−1) on muscle composition (IMAT), cardiometabolic health, and systemic inflammation in older adults with overweight or obesity (12 men and 10 women; age 70 ± 5 years, BMI 31.3 ± 3.2 kg/m2, mean ± SD). No changes in muscle composition were observed over time, independent of protein intake. Total body weight was reduced in both groups (−3.3 ± 1.2%) and lean mass was preserved only with the HP diet. LDL concentration and hip circumference decreased only with the NP diet, while MCP-1 and HsCRP concentrations increased over time in both groups. A HP diet with whole eggs promotes lean mass retention with modest weight loss, but does not positively influence muscle composition, cardiometabolic health or systemic inflammation, compared to a NP diet void of eggs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Egg Intake and Human Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Egg Consumption in Infants is Associated with Longer Recumbent Length and Greater Intake of Several Nutrients Essential in Growth and Development
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060719
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 22 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
PDF Full-text (257 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nutrient intake during infancy is critical for healthy growth and development. The present study examined egg consumption and associations with nutrient intakes, markers of growth and weight-related measures in infants 6–24 months of age (N = 561) compared to infant egg non-consumers
[...] Read more.
Nutrient intake during infancy is critical for healthy growth and development. The present study examined egg consumption and associations with nutrient intakes, markers of growth and weight-related measures in infants 6–24 months of age (N = 561) compared to infant egg non-consumers (N = 2129). Egg consumers were defined as those infants consuming eggs (i.e., with the exclusion of mixed dishes) during a 24-h dietary recall. Associations with nutrient intakes and markers of growth variables were evaluated using data from What We Eat in America, the dietary component of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001–2012. Mean energy and nutrient intakes were adjusted for the sample design using appropriate survey parameters and sample weights. Egg consumption was associated with greater energy intake compared to infants not consuming eggs (1265 ± 27 vs. 1190 ± 14 kcal/day; p = 0.01). Infant consumers of eggs also had greater protein (48 ± 0.7 vs. 41 ± 0.4 g/day), total choline (281 ± 6 vs. 163 ± 2 mg/day), lutein + zeaxanthin (788 ± 64 vs. 533 ± 23 mcg/day), α-linolenic acid (0.87 ± 0.02 vs. 0.82 ± 0.01 g/day), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (0.04 ± 0.02 vs. 0.02 ± 0.001 g/day), vitamin B12 (4.2 ± 0.1 vs. 3.7 ± 0.1 mcg/day), phosphorus (977 ± 15 vs. 903 ± 8 mg/day), and selenium (67 ± 1 vs. 52 ± 0.6 mcg/day; all p-values < 0.05). Egg consumers also had greater consumption of total fat (50 ± 0.7 vs. 45 ± 0.3 g/day), monounsaturated fat (17 ± 0.3 vs. 15 ± 0.1 g/day), saturated fat (20 ± 0.4 vs. 18 ± 0.2 g/day), and sodium (1663 ± 36 vs. 1418 ± 19 mg/day), with lower added sugar (4.7 ± 0.3 vs. 6.1 ± 0.2 tsp eq/day), and total sugar (87 ± 2 vs. 99 ± 1 g/day; all p-values < 0.05) vs. non-consumers of eggs. Egg consumption was also associated with lower intake of dietary folate, iron, magnesium and niacin relative to non-consumers of eggs. Egg consumption in infants was associated with longer recumbent length when compared to non-consumers of eggs (79.2 ± 0.2 vs. 78.7 ± 0.1 cm; p = 0.03). No associations were observed when comparing body weight. When compared to non-consumers of eggs and regardless of food security, poverty-income-ratio and Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition status, egg consumption was associated with greater lutein + zeaxanthin intake per day. The current analyzes show that consumption of eggs in infant 6–24 months of age is linked with several nutrient intakes, including higher protein, lutein + zeaxanthin, choline, B12, selenium and phosphorus; and lower added and total sugars relative to non-consumers. Egg consumers also have less of several nutrients to be encouraged and a higher intake of nutrients to limit, thus presenting opportunities for educational strategies to potentially increase consumption of nutrient-dense foods in combination with eggs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Egg Intake and Human Health)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Egg Intake in Chronic Kidney Disease
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1945; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121945
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 2 December 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
PDF Full-text (305 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are often instructed to adhere to a renal-specific diet depending on the severity and stage of their kidney disease. The prescribed diet may limit certain nutrients, such as phosphorus and potassium, or encourage the consumption of others,
[...] Read more.
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are often instructed to adhere to a renal-specific diet depending on the severity and stage of their kidney disease. The prescribed diet may limit certain nutrients, such as phosphorus and potassium, or encourage the consumption of others, such as high biological value (HBV) proteins. Eggs are an inexpensive, easily available and high-quality source of protein, as well as a rich source of leucine, an essential amino acid that plays a role in muscle protein synthesis. However, egg yolk is a concentrated source of both phosphorus and the trimethylamine N-oxide precursor, choline, both of which may have potentially harmful effects in CKD. The yolk is also an abundant source of cholesterol which has been extensively studied for its effects on lipoprotein cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Efforts to reduce dietary cholesterol to manage dyslipidemia in dialysis patients (already following a renal diet) have not been shown to offer additional benefit. There is a paucity of data regarding the impact of egg consumption on lipid profiles of CKD patients. Additionally, egg consumption has not been associated with the risk of developing CKD based on epidemiological studies. The egg yolk also contains bioactive compounds, including lutein, zeaxanthin, and vitamin D, which may confer health benefits in CKD patients. Here we review research on egg intake and CKD, discuss both potential contraindications and favorable effects of egg consumption, and describe the need for further research examining egg intake and outcomes in the CKD and end-stage renal disease population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Egg Intake and Human Health)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Jacqueline Barona
Affiliation: University of Medellin Colombia
Email:
Topic: Benefits of Egg protein across the life spectrum

Author: Jianping Wu
Affiliation: University of Alberta
Email:
Topic: Eggs for type 2 diabetes

Author: Jessica Cooperstone
Affiliation: The Ohio State University
Email:
Topic: Metabolomics changes associated with chronic egg consumption

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