Special Issue "Dietary Intakes and Metabolic Disorders"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gemma Chiva-Blanch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain;
2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain
Interests: nutrition; atherosclerosis; thrombosis; metabolic syndrome; Mediterranean Diet; Nordic Diet; polyphenols; fatty acids
Prof. Dr. Montserrat Cofán
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain;
2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolic syndrome is defined by a cluster of interrelated cardiovascular risk factors (hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and central adiposity), linked to a chronic, systemic, and low-grade inflammation, which severely increases the risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A growing body of evidence generated in the last decades has shown that not only the energy balance but also the macro-, micro-, and non-nutrient composition of the diet may influence the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome. However, further research is required to increase our understanding about the contribution of diet to metabolic syndrome prevention.

The aim of this proposed Special Issue entitled “Dietary Intakes and Metabolic Syndrome” is to gather original research manuscripts, meta-analysis, and reviews dealing with the relationships between diet as a whole and metabolic syndrome-related diseases, as well as with the effects of specific nutrients or non-nutritional bioactive compounds on this metabolic condition and related pathologic features.

Dr. Gemma Chiva-Blanch
Prof. Dr. Montserrat Cofán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metabolic diseases
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Diet
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Inflammation
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Phytonutrients

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
All You Can Feed: Some Comments on Production of Mouse Diets Used in Biomedical Research with Special Emphasis on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Research
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010163 - 07 Jan 2020
Abstract
The laboratory mouse is the most common used mammalian research model in biomedical research. Usually these animals are maintained in germ-free, gnotobiotic, or specific-pathogen-free facilities. In these facilities, skilled staff takes care of the animals and scientists usually don’t pay much attention about [...] Read more.
The laboratory mouse is the most common used mammalian research model in biomedical research. Usually these animals are maintained in germ-free, gnotobiotic, or specific-pathogen-free facilities. In these facilities, skilled staff takes care of the animals and scientists usually don’t pay much attention about the formulation and quality of diets the animals receive during normal breeding and keeping. However, mice have specific nutritional requirements that must be met to guarantee their potential to grow, reproduce and to respond to pathogens or diverse environmental stress situations evoked by handling and experimental interventions. Nowadays, mouse diets for research purposes are commercially manufactured in an industrial process, in which the safety of food products is addressed through the analysis and control of all biological and chemical materials used for the different diet formulations. Similar to human food, mouse diets must be prepared under good sanitary conditions and truthfully labeled to provide information of all ingredients. This is mandatory to guarantee reproducibility of animal studies. In this review, we summarize some information on mice research diets and general aspects of mouse nutrition including nutrient requirements of mice, leading manufacturers of diets, origin of nutrient compounds, and processing of feedstuffs for mice including dietary coloring, autoclaving and irradiation. Furthermore, we provide some critical views on the potential pitfalls that might result from faulty comparisons of grain-based diets with purified diets in the research data production resulting from confounding nutritional factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intakes and Metabolic Disorders)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop