Special Issue "Dietary Assessment in Diabetes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition Methodology & Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2023 | Viewed by 1001

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Triantafyllos Didangelos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Diabetes Center, 1st Propaedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: diabetic neuropathy; new technologies in diabetes; diabetes mellitus type 1; diabetes mellitus type 2; insulin treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Konstantinos Kantartzis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Nephrology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
2. Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases (IDM) of the Helmholtz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
Interests: prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes; role of adiposity and body fat distribution; fat accumulation in the liver (fatty liver, NAFLD) in the pathogenesis of diabetes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus is a well-known, major global health issue, affecting up to 500 million people, or approximately 9%, of the adult population worldwide. Nutrition holds a central position in diabetes management strategies, constituting perhaps the most relevant part of diabetes prevention programs and being a continuously integrated part of diabetes therapy. Dietary assessments and the information provided can act as the main adjuncts to newer emerging technologies, such as continuous glucose monitoring and insulin pumps, but can also aid towards achieving a better management of diabetes complications, such as nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Dietary assessments also play a major role in micronutrient intake, which is crucial to diabetes mellitus type 2, as certain micronutrient deficiencies (even by malabsorption from medication) can result in complications. Therefore, nowadays, nutrition is the key to the better management of diabetes because nutrition is involved in the pathophysiology of diabetes by affecting insulin sensitivity and secretion. Some of the mechanisms by which nutrition exerts the latter effects are obvious: quantitatively, a high-calorie intake leads to obesity, and the latter, in most cases, to insulin resistance. However, the quality of nutrition most probably plays a critical role, although its relevance is less established and its exact mechanisms remain largely unknown. Several other issues still remain unsolved, such as the right amount of carbohydrate intake, how food affects insulin dosing, whether the combination of nutrients, i.e., specific “diets,” is more relevant than the individual nutrients. All these topics are potential objectives of our Special Issue, “Dietary Assessment and Diabetes,” to which we cordially invite all clinicians and researchers to submit their scientific works, either original or in review form. We look forward to your active participation.

Prof. Dr. Triantafyllos Didangelos
Dr. Konstantinos Kantartzis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • diabetes mellitus
  • continuous glucose monitoring
  • dietary assessment
  • nutrient intake
  • vitamins
  • micronutrients
  • new technologies in diabetes mellitus

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Differences in Dietary Intake Exist among U.S. Adults by Diabetic Status Using NHANES 2009–2016
Nutrients 2022, 14(16), 3284; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14163284 - 11 Aug 2022
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Abstract
The objective was to determine the most frequently consumed food items, food subcategories, and food categories, and those that contributed most to total energy intake for the group of U.S. adults reporting taking insulin, those with type 2 diabetes (T2D) not taking insulin, [...] Read more.
The objective was to determine the most frequently consumed food items, food subcategories, and food categories, and those that contributed most to total energy intake for the group of U.S. adults reporting taking insulin, those with type 2 diabetes (T2D) not taking insulin, and those without diabetes. Laboratory tests and questionnaires of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2016 classified 774 participants reporting taking insulin, 2758 participants reporting T2D not taking insulin, and 17,796 participants without diabetes. Raw and weighted frequency and energy contributions of each food item, food subcategory, and food category were calculated and ranked. Comparisons among groups by broad food category used the Rao–Scott modified chi-square test. Soft drinks ranked as the 8th and 6th most consumed food subcategory of participants with T2D not taking insulin and those without diabetes, and contributed 5th and 2nd most to energy, respectively. The group reporting taking insulin is likely to consume more protein foods and less soft drink compared to the other two groups. Lists of the most frequently reported foods and foods contributing most to energy may be helpful for nutrition education, prescribing diets, and digital-based dietary assessment for the group reporting taking insulin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Assessment in Diabetes)
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Article
Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Relation to Cardiovascular Biomarkers and Dietary Factors among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Nutrients 2022, 14(12), 2435; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14122435 - 12 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) significantly affects the course of diabetes mellitus (DM), resulting in deterioration of insulin sensitivity and metabolic control, as well as many cardiometabolic complications. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between cardiovascular biomarkers, nutritional [...] Read more.
The occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) significantly affects the course of diabetes mellitus (DM), resulting in deterioration of insulin sensitivity and metabolic control, as well as many cardiometabolic complications. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between cardiovascular biomarkers, nutritional status, dietary factors and the occurrence of MetS among 120 participants from northeast Poland (adolescents with type 1 DM and healthy peers). MetS was assessed using several criteria: nutritional status by anthropometric measurements, body composition analysis by bioelectrical impedance, and diet using a food diary and questionnaire. MetS was diagnosed in every third diabetic. Compared to healthy peers, MetS patients had higher total body fat (26% vs. 14%, p < 0.001) and visceral fat (77 cm2 vs. 35 cm2, p < 0.001), and lower total antioxidant status (1.249 mmol/L vs. 1.579 mmol/L, p < 0.001). Additionally, their diet was rich in saturated fatty acids, but low in dietary fiber as well as mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The group of diabetics reported many inappropriate eating behaviors. The combination of those with the presence of an excessive content of visceral fat tissue and abnormal values of MetS components may negatively affect metabolic control, thus accelerating the development of cardiometabolic complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Assessment in Diabetes)
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