Special Issue "Diet and Fatigue"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kristina Norman
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam Rehbrücke, Dept of Nutrition and Gerontology, Nuthetal, Germany
Charité Forschungsgruppe Geriatrie, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Interests: body composition; dietary intake; sarcopenia; cachexia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In chronic disease, fatigue is commonly described as a “state of overwhelming exhaustion which cannot be relieved by sleep”, and it is a frequent occurrence in, e.g., cancer. Fatigue is related to an impairment of a variety of functional parameters and has debilitating effects on quality of life. Many predictors of fatigue have been identified including inflammation, sleep deprivation, and a loss of appetite and nutritional deficiency. Muscle weakness is considered a key component in fatigue, and muscle fatigue itself is the inability of the muscle to generate force, which not only occurs in disease but is commonly found in, e.g., athletes, among whom muscle fatigue has a considerable impact on performance.

This Special Issue will address the broad spectrum of fatigue and explore the associations between nutritional status, dietary intake, anorexia, and fatigue, as well as fatigue-related parameters welcoming both original submissions as well as review articles.

Prof. Dr. Kristina Norman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • dietary intake
  • fatigue
  • nutritional status
  • functional ability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Severe Weight Loss and Its Association with Fatigue in Old Patients at Discharge from a Geriatric Hospital
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2415; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102415 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Although malnutrition is frequent in the old, little is known about its association with fatigue. We evaluated the relation of self-reported severe weight loss with fatigue and the predictors for fatigue in old patients at hospital discharge. Severe weight loss was defined according [...] Read more.
Although malnutrition is frequent in the old, little is known about its association with fatigue. We evaluated the relation of self-reported severe weight loss with fatigue and the predictors for fatigue in old patients at hospital discharge. Severe weight loss was defined according to involuntary weight loss ≥5% in the last three months. We determined fatigue with the validated Brief Fatigue Inventory questionnaire. The regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, number of comorbidities, medications/day, and BMI. Of 424 patients aged between 61 and 98 y, 34.1% had severe weight loss. Fatigue was higher in patients with severe weight loss (3.7 ± 2.3 vs. 3.2 ± 2.3 points, p = 0.021). In a multinomial regression model, weight loss was independently associated with higher risk for moderate fatigue (OR:1.172, CI:1.026–1.338, p = 0.019) and with increased risk for severe fatigue (OR:1.209, CI:1.047–1.395, p = 0.010) together with the number of medications/day (OR:1.220, CI:1.023-1.455, p = 0.027). In a binary regression model, severe weight loss predicted moderate-to-severe fatigue in the study population (OR:1.651, CI:1.052-2.590, p = 0.029). In summary, patients with self-reported severe weight loss at hospital discharge exhibited higher fatigue levels and severe weight loss was an independent predictor of moderate and severe fatigue, placing these patients at risk for impaired outcome in the post-hospital period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
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Open AccessArticle
Supplementation with Saccharomyces boulardii Increases the Maximal Oxygen Consumption and Maximal Aerobic Speed Attained by Rats Subjected to an Incremental-Speed Exercise
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2352; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102352 - 02 Oct 2019
Abstract
Benefits to the host metabolism resulting from Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) supplementation have been described; however, no study has investigated the effects of this supplementation on aerobic metabolism and performance during physical exercise. Thus, in the present study, we addressed the effects of Sb [...] Read more.
Benefits to the host metabolism resulting from Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) supplementation have been described; however, no study has investigated the effects of this supplementation on aerobic metabolism and performance during physical exercise. Thus, in the present study, we addressed the effects of Sb supplementation on the rate of oxygen consumption (VO2), mechanical efficiency (external work divided by VO2), and aerobic performance of rats subjected to fatiguing, incremental-speed exercise. Twenty-six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: (1) non-supplemented, in which rats received 0.1 mL of a saline solution, and (2) Sb-supplemented, in which rats received 0.1 mL of a suspension containing 8.0 log10 colony-forming units. The rats received the treatments by gavage for 10 consecutive days; they were then subjected to fatiguing treadmill running. Sb supplementation did not change the VO2 values or mechanical efficiency during submaximal exercise intensities. In contrast, at fatigue, VO2MAX was increased by 12.7% in supplemented rats compared with controls (p = 0.01). Moreover, Sb improved aerobic performance, as evidenced by a 12.4% increase in maximal running speed attained by the supplemented rats (p < 0.05). We conclude that Sb supplementation for 10 days increases VO2MAX and aerobic performance in rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
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Open AccessArticle
Inflammation, Appetite and Food Intake in Older Hospitalized Patients
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 1986; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11091986 - 22 Aug 2019
Abstract
The effect of inflammation on appetite and food intake has been rarely studied in humans. In this study, we examined the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), as an inflammatory marker, with appetite and food intake among older hospitalized patients. A total of 200 [...] Read more.
The effect of inflammation on appetite and food intake has been rarely studied in humans. In this study, we examined the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), as an inflammatory marker, with appetite and food intake among older hospitalized patients. A total of 200 older individuals, who were consecutively admitted to a geriatric acute care ward, participated in this prospective observational study. Appetite was evaluated using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ), respectively. Food intake was measured according to plate diagram method and participants were categorized as having food intake <75% and ≥75% of meals served. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF). In addition, serum CRP was analyzed and the levels >3.0 (mg/dL) were considered as moderate to severe inflammation. Of total population with mean age 81.4 ± 6.6 years (62.5% females), 51 (25.5%) had no inflammation and 88 (44.0%) and 61 (30.5%) had mild and moderate to severe inflammation, respectively. According to MNA-SF, 9.0% and 60.0% had normal nutritional status or a risk of malnutrition, respectively, whereas 31.0% were malnourished. Based on the SNAQ-appetite-question, 32.5% of the patients demonstrated poor and very poor appetite whereas 23.5% reported severe loss of appetite according to ESAS. Ninety-five (48.0%) of the participants had food intake <75% of the meals offered. Significant associations between SNAQ-appetite (p = 0.003) and ESAS-appetite (p = 0.013) scores and CRP levels were observed. In addition, significant differences were observed in CRP levels between intake ≥75% and <75% of meals served (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there were significant associations between appetite and nutritional status whereas malnourished older patients demonstrated a decreased appetite compared to those with normal nutritional status (p = 0.011). In a regression analysis, inflammation was the major independent risk factor for patients’ appetite (p = 0.003) and food intake (p = 0.011) whereas other variables such as infection (p = 0.960), chronic inflammatory diseases (p = 0.371), age (p = 0.679) and gender (p = 0.447) do not show any impact on appetite. Our findings confirm that poor appetite and low food intake are associated with inflammation in older hospitalized patients, suggesting that inflammation may contribute an important aspect to the development of malnutrition in these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
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Open AccessArticle
An Increase in Fat Mass Index Predicts a Deterioration of Running Speed
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030701 - 25 Mar 2019
Abstract
A low fat mass is associated with a good running performance. This study explores whether modifications in body composition predicted changes in running speed. We included people who underwent several measurements of body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis between 1999 and 2016, at [...] Read more.
A low fat mass is associated with a good running performance. This study explores whether modifications in body composition predicted changes in running speed. We included people who underwent several measurements of body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis between 1999 and 2016, at the “Course de l’Escalade”, taking place yearly in Geneva. Body composition was reported as a fat-free mass index (FFMI) and fat mass index (FMI). Running distances (men: 7.2 km; women: 4.8 km) and running times were used to calculate speed in km/h. We performed multivariate linear mixed regression models to determine whether modifications of body mass index, FFMI, FMI or the combination of FFMI and FMI predicted changes in running speed. The study population included 377 women (1419 observations) and 509 men (2161 observations). Changes in running speed were best predicted by the combination of FFMI and FMI. Running speed improved with a reduction of FMI in both sexes (women: ß −0.31; 95% CI −0.35 to −0.27, p < 0.001. men: ß −0.43; 95% CI −0.48 to −0.39, p < 0.001) and a reduction of FFMI in men (ß −0.20; 95% CI −0.26 to −0.15, p < 0.001). Adjusted for body composition, the decline in running performance occurred from 50 years onward, but appeared earlier with a body mass, FFMI or FMI above the median value at baseline. Changes of running speed are determined mostly by changes in FMI. The decline in running performance occurs from 50 years onward but appears earlier in people with a high body mass index, FFMI or FMI at baseline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Anti-Inflammatory Diets and Fatigue
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2315; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102315 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
Accumulating data indicates a link between a pro-inflammatory status and occurrence of chronic disease-related fatigue. The questions are whether the observed inflammatory profile can be (a) improved by anti-inflammatory diets, and (b) if this improvement can in turn be translated into a significant [...] Read more.
Accumulating data indicates a link between a pro-inflammatory status and occurrence of chronic disease-related fatigue. The questions are whether the observed inflammatory profile can be (a) improved by anti-inflammatory diets, and (b) if this improvement can in turn be translated into a significant fatigue reduction. The aim of this narrative review was to investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory nutrients, foods, and diets on inflammatory markers and fatigue in various patient populations. Next to observational and epidemiological studies, a total of 21 human trials have been evaluated in this work. Current available research is indicative, rather than evident, regarding the effectiveness of individuals’ use of single nutrients with anti-inflammatory and fatigue-reducing effects. In contrast, clinical studies demonstrate that a balanced diet with whole grains high in fibers, polyphenol-rich vegetables, and omega-3 fatty acid-rich foods might be able to improve disease-related fatigue symptoms. Nonetheless, further research is needed to clarify conflicting results in the literature and substantiate the promising results from human trials on fatigue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
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