Next Article in Journal
Biological Response to Meal Ingestion: Gender Differences
Next Article in Special Issue
Inflammation, Appetite and Food Intake in Older Hospitalized Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Protective Effects of CISD2 and Influence of Curcumin on CISD2 Expression in Aged Animals and Inflammatory Cell Model
Open AccessArticle

An Increase in Fat Mass Index Predicts a Deterioration of Running Speed

1
Clinical Nutrition, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
2
Rehabilitation and Palliative Care, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
3
Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030701
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
A low fat mass is associated with a good running performance. This study explores whether modifications in body composition predicted changes in running speed. We included people who underwent several measurements of body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis between 1999 and 2016, at the “Course de l’Escalade”, taking place yearly in Geneva. Body composition was reported as a fat-free mass index (FFMI) and fat mass index (FMI). Running distances (men: 7.2 km; women: 4.8 km) and running times were used to calculate speed in km/h. We performed multivariate linear mixed regression models to determine whether modifications of body mass index, FFMI, FMI or the combination of FFMI and FMI predicted changes in running speed. The study population included 377 women (1419 observations) and 509 men (2161 observations). Changes in running speed were best predicted by the combination of FFMI and FMI. Running speed improved with a reduction of FMI in both sexes (women: ß −0.31; 95% CI −0.35 to −0.27, p < 0.001. men: ß −0.43; 95% CI −0.48 to −0.39, p < 0.001) and a reduction of FFMI in men (ß −0.20; 95% CI −0.26 to −0.15, p < 0.001). Adjusted for body composition, the decline in running performance occurred from 50 years onward, but appeared earlier with a body mass, FFMI or FMI above the median value at baseline. Changes of running speed are determined mostly by changes in FMI. The decline in running performance occurs from 50 years onward but appears earlier in people with a high body mass index, FFMI or FMI at baseline. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioelectrical impedance analysis; fat mass; fat-free mass; running performance bioelectrical impedance analysis; fat mass; fat-free mass; running performance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Genton, L.; Mareschal, J.; Karsegard, V.L.; Achamrah, N.; Delsoglio, M.; Pichard, C.; Graf, C.; Herrmann, F.R. An Increase in Fat Mass Index Predicts a Deterioration of Running Speed. Nutrients 2019, 11, 701.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop