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Open AccessReview

Anti-Inflammatory Diets and Fatigue

by 1,2,*, 1,2 and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Nutrition and Gerontology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
2
Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
3
Research Group on Geriatrics, Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Berlin Institute of Health, 13347 Berlin, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2315; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102315
Received: 23 August 2019 / Revised: 12 September 2019 / Accepted: 25 September 2019 / Published: 30 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Fatigue)
Accumulating data indicates a link between a pro-inflammatory status and occurrence of chronic disease-related fatigue. The questions are whether the observed inflammatory profile can be (a) improved by anti-inflammatory diets, and (b) if this improvement can in turn be translated into a significant fatigue reduction. The aim of this narrative review was to investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory nutrients, foods, and diets on inflammatory markers and fatigue in various patient populations. Next to observational and epidemiological studies, a total of 21 human trials have been evaluated in this work. Current available research is indicative, rather than evident, regarding the effectiveness of individuals’ use of single nutrients with anti-inflammatory and fatigue-reducing effects. In contrast, clinical studies demonstrate that a balanced diet with whole grains high in fibers, polyphenol-rich vegetables, and omega-3 fatty acid-rich foods might be able to improve disease-related fatigue symptoms. Nonetheless, further research is needed to clarify conflicting results in the literature and substantiate the promising results from human trials on fatigue. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic fatigue; myalgic encephalomyelitis; inflammation; cytokines; anti-inflammatory nutrition; omega-3 fatty acids; polyphenols; probiotics; fatigue reduction diet; cancer chronic fatigue; myalgic encephalomyelitis; inflammation; cytokines; anti-inflammatory nutrition; omega-3 fatty acids; polyphenols; probiotics; fatigue reduction diet; cancer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haß, U.; Herpich, C.; Norman, K. Anti-Inflammatory Diets and Fatigue. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2315. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102315

AMA Style

Haß U, Herpich C, Norman K. Anti-Inflammatory Diets and Fatigue. Nutrients. 2019; 11(10):2315. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102315

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haß, Ulrike; Herpich, Catrin; Norman, Kristina. 2019. "Anti-Inflammatory Diets and Fatigue" Nutrients 11, no. 10: 2315. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102315

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