Special Issue "Non-Coding RNAs as Therapeutic Targets"

A special issue of Non-Coding RNA (ISSN 2311-553X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kevin V. Morris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Gene Therapy, City of Hope–Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA 91010, USA
Interests: epigenetics; long non-coding RNA; small non-coding RNA; RNAi; HIV; pseudogenes; DNA methylation; tumor suppressor genes; lentivirus; chromatin; nucleosomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last decade, the study of non-coding RNA has exploded with over 200,000 papers published on the subject. There is now a plethora of experimental works characterizing the role and mechanistic function of various forms of non-coding transcripts, ranging from long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) to micro-RNAs (miRNA) in virtually every disease known to man, including cancer, diabetes, genetic abnormalities, viral and bacterial infection, and immunity. Notably, many diseases have been observed to have unique and specific non-coding RNAs involved in their overall pathology. These observations suggest that these non-coding transcripts could serve as bona fide targets to ameliorate disease or disease-induced conditions. Ongoing questions include how these transcripts function mechanistically to impart disease phenotypes and to what extent these disease-specific transcripts can serve as bona fide targets for next-generation therapeutics and how best to target these transcripts of interest.

This Special Issue will group together works on the latest non-coding RNA studies related to disease and highlight those unique transcripts that may serve as targets for next-generation therapeutic approaches to treating various diseases.

For this Special Issue, we will consider manuscripts on the following topics:

  • ncRNAs, including miRNAs, as regulators of disease states;
  • novel functions of and mechanistic insights into ncRNAs in disease;
  • ncRNA targets for specific diseases and those agents best utilized to target these transcripts of interest; and
  • pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the roles of ncRNAs in disease.

Prof. Dr. Kevin V. Morris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Non-Coding RNA is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ncRNA, miRNA, and antisense RNA in disease;
  • miRNA, siRNA, and antisense oligonucleotide technology in targeting ncRNA;
  • ncRNAs in genetic diseases;
  • ncRNAs in cancer;
  • ncRNAs in viral and bacterial infection;
  • ncRNAs and SNPs in disease;
  • pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating targeted disruption of disease-relevant ncRNAs.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
MiR-205 Dysregulations in Breast Cancer: The Complexity and Opportunities
Non-Coding RNA 2019, 5(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna5040053 - 19 Nov 2019
Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that downregulate target gene expression by imperfect base-pairing with the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of target gene mRNAs. MiRNAs play important roles in regulating cancer cell proliferation, stemness maintenance, tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, and cancer therapeutic resistance. [...] Read more.
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that downregulate target gene expression by imperfect base-pairing with the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of target gene mRNAs. MiRNAs play important roles in regulating cancer cell proliferation, stemness maintenance, tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, and cancer therapeutic resistance. While studies have shown that dysregulation of miRNA-205-5p (miR-205) expression is controversial in different types of human cancers, it is generally observed that miR-205-5p expression level is downregulated in breast cancer and that miR-205-5p exhibits a tumor suppressive function in breast cancer. This review focuses on the role of miR-205-5p dysregulation in different subtypes of breast cancer, with discussions on the effects of miR-205-5p on breast cancer cell proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), metastasis, stemness and therapy-resistance, as well as genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate miR-205-5p expression in breast cancer. In addition, the potential diagnostic and therapeutic value of miR-205-5p in breast cancer is also discussed. A comprehensive list of validated miR-205-5p direct targets is presented. It is concluded that miR-205-5p is an important tumor suppressive miRNA capable of inhibiting the growth and metastasis of human breast cancer, especially triple negative breast cancer. MiR-205-5p might be both a potential diagnostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNAs as Therapeutic Targets)
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