Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lina Bezdetnaya-Bolotine

Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, Institut Cancérologie Lorraine, Vandœuvre-Les-Nancy, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: photodynamic therapy; photodiagnosis; drug delivery; nanoparticles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are launching a Special Issue of Nanomaterials entitled “Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy”. Application of the photoactive nanoparticles for cancer treatment is one of the promising directions in the development of personalized medicine. During the light-triggered therapy of cancer, heat (Photothermal Therapy, PTT) and reactive oxygen species (Photodynamic Therapy, PDT) generated by photosensitizer are the two main effectors. This special issue aims to cover different strategies with high safety against cancer improving the effect of phototherapy. For this Special Issue, we are particularly interested in the design of nanomaterials, effects of particles size and surface properties on their biodistribution and therapeutic efficiency for cancer PTT/PDT. Reports on monitoring of nanocarriers and drug release/accumulation profile in preclinical models are highly welcomed. This special issue invites both original articles and reviews.  

Dr. Lina Bezdetnaya-Bolotine
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Photothermal therapy
  • Photosensitizer
  • Nanocarrier
  • Drug delivery
  • Nanotherapeutics

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Methylene-Blue-Encapsulated Liposomes as Photodynamic Therapy Nano Agents for Breast Cancer Cells
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010014
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 23 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (19437 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Methylene blue (MB) is a widely used dye and photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent that can produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) after light exposure, triggering apoptosis. However, it is hard for the dye to penetrate through the cell membrane, leading to poor cellular uptake; [...] Read more.
Methylene blue (MB) is a widely used dye and photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent that can produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) after light exposure, triggering apoptosis. However, it is hard for the dye to penetrate through the cell membrane, leading to poor cellular uptake; thus, drug carriers, which could enhance the cellular uptake, are a suitable solution. In addition, the defective vessels resulting from fast vessel outgrowth leads to an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, which gives nanoscale drug carriers a promising potential. In this study, we applied poly(12-(methacryloyloxy)dodecyl phosphorylcholine), a zwitterionic polymer-lipid, to self-assemble into liposomes and encapsulate MB (MB-liposome). Its properties of high stability and fast intracellular uptake were confirmed, and the higher in vitro ROS generation ability of MB-liposomes than that of free MB was also verified. For in vivo tests, we examined the toxicity in mice via tail vein injection. With the features found, MB-liposome has the potential of being an effective PDT nano agent for cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Impact of Quantum Dot Surface on Complex Formation with Chlorin e6 and Photodynamic Therapy
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010009
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 16 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 22 December 2018
PDF Full-text (3961 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanomaterials have permeated various fields of scientific research, including that of biomedicine, as alternatives for disease diagnosis and therapy. Among different structures, quantum dots (QDs) have distinctive physico-chemical properties sought after in cancer research and eradication. Within the context of cancer therapy, QDs [...] Read more.
Nanomaterials have permeated various fields of scientific research, including that of biomedicine, as alternatives for disease diagnosis and therapy. Among different structures, quantum dots (QDs) have distinctive physico-chemical properties sought after in cancer research and eradication. Within the context of cancer therapy, QDs serve the role of transporters and energy donors to photodynamic therapy (PDT) drugs, extending the applicability and efficiency of classic PDT. In contrast to conventional PDT agents, QDs’ surface can be designed to promote cellular targeting and internalization, while their spectral properties enable better light harvesting and deep-tissue use. Here, we investigate the possibility of complex formation between different amphiphilic coating bearing QDs and photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6). We show that complex formation dynamics are dependent on the type of coating—phospholipids or amphiphilic polymers—as well as on the surface charge of QDs. Förster’s resonant energy transfer occurred in every complex studied, confirming the possibility of indirect Ce6 excitation. Nonetheless, in vitro PDT activity was restricted only to negative charge bearing QD-Ce6 complexes, correlating with better accumulation in cancer cells. Overall, these findings help to better design such and similar complexes, as gained insights can be straightforwardly translated to other types of nanostructures—expanding the palette of possible therapeutic agents for cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Temoporfin-in-Cyclodextrin-in-Liposome—A New Approach for Anticancer Drug Delivery: The Optimization of Composition
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100847
Received: 12 September 2018 / Revised: 3 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2963 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main goal of this study was to use hybrid delivery system for effective transportation of temoporfin (meta-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin, mTHPC) to target tissue. We suggested to couple two independent delivery systems (liposomes and inclusion complexes) to achieve drug-in-cyclodextrin-in-liposome (DCL) nanoconstructs. We further [...] Read more.
The main goal of this study was to use hybrid delivery system for effective transportation of temoporfin (meta-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin, mTHPC) to target tissue. We suggested to couple two independent delivery systems (liposomes and inclusion complexes) to achieve drug-in-cyclodextrin-in-liposome (DCL) nanoconstructs. We further optimized the composition of DCLs, aiming to alter in a more favorable way a distribution of temoporfin in tumor tissue. We have prepared DCLs with different compositions varying the concentration of mTHPC and the type of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives (Hydroxypropyl-, Methyl- and Trimethyl-β-CD). DCLs were prepared by thin-hydration technique and mTHPC/β-CD complexes were added at hydration step. The size was about 135 nm with the surface charge of (−38 mV). We have demonstrated that DCLs are stable and almost all mTHPC is bound to β-CDs in the inner aqueous liposome core. Among all tested DCLs, trimethyl-β-CD-based DCL demonstrated a homogenous accumulation of mTHPC across tumor spheroid volume, thus supposing optimal mTHPC distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluating Nanoshells and a Potent Biladiene Photosensitizer for Dual Photothermal and Photodynamic Therapy of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090658
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 25 August 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Light-activated therapies are ideal for treating cancer because they are non-invasive and highly specific to the area of light application. Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are two types of light-activated therapies that show great promise for treating solid tumors. In PTT, [...] Read more.
Light-activated therapies are ideal for treating cancer because they are non-invasive and highly specific to the area of light application. Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are two types of light-activated therapies that show great promise for treating solid tumors. In PTT, nanoparticles embedded within tumors emit heat in response to laser light that induces cancer cell death. In PDT, photosensitizers introduced to the diseased tissue transfer the absorbed light energy to nearby ground state molecular oxygen to produce singlet oxygen, which is a potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is toxic to cancer cells. Although PTT and PDT have been extensively evaluated as independent therapeutic strategies, they each face limitations that hinder their overall success. To overcome these limitations, we evaluated a dual PTT/PDT strategy for treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells mediated by a powerful combination of silica core/gold shell nanoshells (NSs) and palladium 10,10-dimethyl-5,15-bis(pentafluorophenyl)biladiene-based (Pd[DMBil1]-PEG750) photosensitizers (PSs), which enable PTT and PDT, respectively. We found that dual therapy works synergistically to induce more cell death than either therapy alone. Further, we determined that low doses of light can be applied in this approach to primarily induce apoptotic cell death, which is vastly preferred over necrotic cell death. Together, our results show that dual PTT/PDT using silica core/gold shell NSs and Pd[DMBil1]-PEG750 PSs is a comprehensive therapeutic strategy to non-invasively induce apoptotic cancer cell death. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Clinical Trials of Thermosensitive Nanomaterials: An Overview
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020191
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1724 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently, we are facing increasing demand to develop efficient systems for the detection and treatment of diseases that can realistically improve distinct aspects of healthcare in our society. Sensitive nanomaterials that respond to environmental stimuli can play an important role in this task. [...] Read more.
Currently, we are facing increasing demand to develop efficient systems for the detection and treatment of diseases that can realistically improve distinct aspects of healthcare in our society. Sensitive nanomaterials that respond to environmental stimuli can play an important role in this task. In this manuscript, we review the clinical trials carried out to date on thermosensitive nanomaterials, including all those clinical trials in hybrid nanomaterials that respond to other stimuli (e.g., magnetic, infrared radiation, and ultrasound). Specifically, we discuss their use in diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. At present, none of the existing trials focused on diagnosis take advantage of the thermosensitive characteristics of these nanoparticles. Indeed, almost all clinical trials consulted explore the use of Ferumoxytol as a current imaging test enhancer. However, the thermal property is being further exploited in the field of disease treatment, especially for the delivery of antitumor drugs. In this regard, ThermoDox®, based on lysolipid thermally sensitive liposome technology to encapsulate doxorubicin (DOX), is the flagship drug. In this review, we have evidenced the discrepancy existing between the number of published papers in thermosensitive nanomaterials and their clinical use, which could be due to the relative novelty of this area of research; more time is needed to validate it through clinical trials. We have no doubt that in the coming years there will be an explosion of clinical trials related to thermosensitive nanomaterials that will surely help to improve current treatments and, above all, will impact on patients’ quality of life and life expectancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Open AccessReview Thermo-Sensitive Nanomaterials: Recent Advance in Synthesis and Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(11), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8110935
Received: 9 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6164 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to open many new fronts in biomedical research by exploiting the peculiar properties of materials at the nanoscale. The thermal sensitivity of certain materials is a highly valuable property because it can be exploited in many promising [...] Read more.
Progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to open many new fronts in biomedical research by exploiting the peculiar properties of materials at the nanoscale. The thermal sensitivity of certain materials is a highly valuable property because it can be exploited in many promising applications, such as thermo-sensitive drug or gene delivery systems, thermotherapy, thermal biosensors, imaging, and diagnosis. This review focuses on recent advances in thermo-sensitive nanomaterials of interest in biomedical applications. We provide an overview of the different kinds of thermoresponsive nanomaterials, discussing their potential and the physical mechanisms behind their thermal response. We thoroughly review their applications in biomedicine and finally discuss the current challenges and future perspectives of thermal therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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Open AccessReview Nano-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer: Enhancement of Cancer Specificity and Therapeutic Effects
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(11), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8110923
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 25 October 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1417 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Deregulation of cell growth and development lead to cancer, a severe condition that claims millions of lives worldwide. Targeted or selective approaches used during cancer treatment determine the efficacy and outcome of the therapy. In order to enhance specificity and targeting and obtain [...] Read more.
Deregulation of cell growth and development lead to cancer, a severe condition that claims millions of lives worldwide. Targeted or selective approaches used during cancer treatment determine the efficacy and outcome of the therapy. In order to enhance specificity and targeting and obtain better treatment options for cancer, novel modalities are currently under development. Photodynamic therapy has the potential to eradicate cancer, and combination therapy would yield even greater outcomes. Nanomedicine-aided cancer therapy shows enhanced specificity for cancer cells and minimal side-effects coupled with effective cancer destruction both in vitro and in vivo. Nanocarriers used in drug-delivery systems are very capable of penetrating the cancer stem cell niche, simultaneously killing cancer cells and eradicating drug-resistant cancer stem cells, yielding therapeutic efficiency of up to 100-fold against drug-resistant cancer in comparison with free drugs. Safety precautions should be considered when using nano-mediated therapy as the effects of extended exposure to biological environments are still to be determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Photothermal/Photodynamic Therapy)
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