Special Issue "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology for Green Energy Harvesting, Storage, and Application"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 4580

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Qijie Liang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore
Interests: two-dimensional materials and devices; atomic-scale defect engineering; flexible sensors; nanogenerators
Prof. Dr. Chengkuo Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583, Singapore
2. Center for Intelligent Sensors and MEMS (CISM), National University of Singapore, Singapore 117608, Singapore
Interests: sensors; micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems; nanophotonics; IoT
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Customized electronics with a decent flexibility, miniaturization, and intellectualization have strong potential to improve one’s quality of life. With the rapid advancement in nanoscience and nanotechnology, the power consumption of micro-/nano-electronics are continuously being shrunk from a mW to μW/nW scale, enabling the conversion of ubiquitous, but usually unexploited, ambient green energy as a promising power solution for small electronics. Harvesting, storing, and managing these energies, including, for example, mechanical, thermal, and light, may overcome the limitation of massive batteries, as well as extend sustainability. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to publish original research and review articles focusing on advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnology for effective harvesting, storage, and utilization of ambient green energy. This Special Issue will cover topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Nanomaterials for mechanical energy conversion (human motion, sound, wind, wave, etc.)
  • Nanomaterials for thermal energy conversion (human body, air, electronics, building, etc.)
  • Hybrid energy harvesters
  • Nanomaterials for storage devices (supercapacitors, batteries, etc.)
  • System integration
  • Self-powered sensing
  • Circuit management
  • Theoretical studies on energy conversion

Dr. Qijie Liang
Prof. Dr. Chengkuo Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • energy harvesting
  • energy storage
  • flexible sensors
  • multifunctional applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
γ-Valerolactone Production from Levulinic Acid Hydrogenation Using Ni Supported Nanoparticles: Influence of Tungsten Loading and pH of Synthesis
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(12), 2017; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12122017 - 11 Jun 2022
Viewed by 625
Abstract
γ-Valerolactone (GVL) has been considered an alternative as biofuel in the production of carbon-based chemicals; however, the use of noble metals and corrosive solvents has been a problem. In this work, Ni supported nanocatalysts were prepared to produce γ-Valerolactone from levulinic acid using [...] Read more.
γ-Valerolactone (GVL) has been considered an alternative as biofuel in the production of carbon-based chemicals; however, the use of noble metals and corrosive solvents has been a problem. In this work, Ni supported nanocatalysts were prepared to produce γ-Valerolactone from levulinic acid using methanol as solvent at a temperature of 170 °C utilizing 4 MPa of H2. Supports were modified at pH 3 using acetic acid (CH3COOH) and pH 9 using ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) with different tungsten (W) loadings (1%, 3%, and 5%) by the Sol-gel method. Ni was deposited by the suspension impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by various techniques including XRD, N2 physisorption, UV-Vis, SEM, TEM, XPS, H2-TPR, and Pyridine FTIR. Based on the study of acidity and activity relation, Ni dispersion due to the Lewis acid sites contributed by W at pH 9, producing nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm of Ni, and could be responsible for the high esterification activity of levulinic acid (LA) to Methyl levulinate being more selective to catalytic hydrogenation. Products and by-products were analyzed by 1H NMR. Optimum catalytic activity was obtained with 5% W at pH 9, with 80% yield after 24 h of reaction. The higher catalytic activity was attributed to the particle size and the amount of Lewis acid sites generated by modifying the pH of synthesis and the amount of W in the support due to the spillover effect. Full article
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Communication
Electrode–Electrolyte Interactions in an Aqueous Aluminum–Carbon Rechargeable Battery System
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3235; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123235 - 28 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 982
Abstract
Being environmentally friendly, safe and easy to handle, aqueous electrolytes are of particular interest for next-generation electrochemical energy storage devices. When coupled with an abundant, recyclable and low-cost electrode material such as aluminum, the promise of a green and economically sustainable battery system [...] Read more.
Being environmentally friendly, safe and easy to handle, aqueous electrolytes are of particular interest for next-generation electrochemical energy storage devices. When coupled with an abundant, recyclable and low-cost electrode material such as aluminum, the promise of a green and economically sustainable battery system has extraordinary appeal. In this work, we study the interaction of an aqueous electrolyte with an aluminum plate anode and various graphitic cathodes. Upon establishing the boundary conditions for optimal electrolyte performance, we find that a mesoporous reduced graphene oxide powder constitutes a better cathode material option than graphite flakes. Full article
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Review

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Review
Carbon-Coatings Improve Performance of Li-Ion Battery
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(11), 1936; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12111936 - 06 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The development of lithium-ion batteries largely relies on the cathode and anode materials. In particular, the optimization of cathode materials plays an extremely important role in improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries, such as specific capacity or cycling stability. Carbon coating modifying the [...] Read more.
The development of lithium-ion batteries largely relies on the cathode and anode materials. In particular, the optimization of cathode materials plays an extremely important role in improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries, such as specific capacity or cycling stability. Carbon coating modifying the surface of cathode materials is regarded as an effective strategy that meets the demand of Lithium-ion battery cathodes. This work mainly reviews the modification mechanism and method of carbon coating, and summarizes the recent progress of carbon coating on some typical cathode materials (LiFePO4, LiMn2O4, LiCoO2, NCA (LiNiCoAlO2) and NCM (LiNiMnCoO2)). In addition, the limitations of the carbon coating on the cathode are also introduced. Suggestions on improving the effectiveness of carbon coating for future study are also presented. Full article
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Review
Recent Progress in the Energy Harvesting Technology—From Self-Powered Sensors to Self-Sustained IoT, and New Applications
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(11), 2975; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11112975 - 05 Nov 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1589
Abstract
With the fast development of energy harvesting technology, micro-nano or scale-up energy harvesters have been proposed to allow sensors or internet of things (IoT) applications with self-powered or self-sustained capabilities. Facilitation within smart homes, manipulators in industries and monitoring systems in natural settings [...] Read more.
With the fast development of energy harvesting technology, micro-nano or scale-up energy harvesters have been proposed to allow sensors or internet of things (IoT) applications with self-powered or self-sustained capabilities. Facilitation within smart homes, manipulators in industries and monitoring systems in natural settings are all moving toward intellectually adaptable and energy-saving advances by converting distributed energies across diverse situations. The updated developments of major applications powered by improved energy harvesters are highlighted in this review. To begin, we study the evolution of energy harvesting technologies from fundamentals to various materials. Secondly, self-powered sensors and self-sustained IoT applications are discussed regarding current strategies for energy harvesting and sensing. Third, subdivided classifications investigate typical and new applications for smart homes, gas sensing, human monitoring, robotics, transportation, blue energy, aircraft, and aerospace. Lastly, the prospects of smart cities in the 5G era are discussed and summarized, along with research and application directions that have emerged. Full article
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