Special Issue "Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (14 June 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vi-Khanh Truong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanobiotechnology Lab, School of Science, RMIT University, 124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
Interests: cell-nanomaterial interactions; biomaterials; antibacterial nanomaterials; antifungal nanomaterials; implants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become one of the major health issues in the 21st century. The problem of AMR has become more serious with the increase rate of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Over several decades, bacteria have developed more resistance to each new antibiotic coming to market. Faced with this reality, the need for action to develop the strategy for antibacterial materials in health care is imperative. Nanomaterials are a very promising approach for the next-generation of antibacterial coatings. Antimicrobial surfaces are important in everyday applications, ranging from healthcare purposes to food and agricultural applications. Different fabrications can be utilised to design the antimicrobial surfaces, like the immobilisation of antibacterial agents into the matrix of materials, slow-release of antibacterial agents, functionalisation of surfaces to prevent the bacterial adhesion, and nanostructuring the surfaces to prevent and inhibit the growth of bacteria.

In this context, this Special Issue welcomes the submission of original research works as well as reviews dealing with antibacterial surfaces. Topics can range from fabrication to applications of antibacterial coatings.

Accepted papers are published in the joint Special Issue in Nanomaterials or Nanomanufacturing (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomanufacturing/special_issues/antibacterial_coating_nano).

Dr. Vi Khanh Truong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial coatings
  • antibacterial surfaces
  • fabrication
  • characterisation
  • applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
One-Pot Synthesis of SiO2@Ag Mesoporous Nanoparticle Coating for Inhibition of Escherichia coli Bacteria on Various Surfaces
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020549 - 22 Feb 2021
Viewed by 633
Abstract
Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as antibacterial agents are of considerable interest owing to their simplicity, high surface area to volume ratio, and efficient oligodynamic properties. Hence, we investigated the synthesis of silica-supported Ag NPs (SiO2@Ag) as an effective antibacterial agent by [...] Read more.
Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as antibacterial agents are of considerable interest owing to their simplicity, high surface area to volume ratio, and efficient oligodynamic properties. Hence, we investigated the synthesis of silica-supported Ag NPs (SiO2@Ag) as an effective antibacterial agent by using a wet-impregnation method. The formation of SiO2@Ag with Ag NP (5–15 nm diameter) on the silica particle (100–130 nm diameter) was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The study on antibacterial activity was performed in a liquid culture to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) bacteria. Both bacteria are chosen to understand difference in the effect of Ag NPs against Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. SiO2@Ag mesoporous nanoparticles had excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli bacteria and fully restricted the bacterial growth when the material concentration was increased up to 1.00 mg/mL. In addition, the obtained material had good adhesion to both steel and polyethylene substrates and exhibited a high inhibition effect against E. coli bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications)
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Article
Self-Assembled Monolayers of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles on Glass as Antibacterial Coatings
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020352 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1146
Abstract
We developed an easy and reproducible synthetic method to graft a monolayer of copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NP) on glass and exploited their particular antibacterial features. Samples were fully characterized showing a good stability, a neat photo-thermal effect when irradiated in the Near [...] Read more.
We developed an easy and reproducible synthetic method to graft a monolayer of copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NP) on glass and exploited their particular antibacterial features. Samples were fully characterized showing a good stability, a neat photo-thermal effect when irradiated in the Near InfraRed (NIR) region (in the so called “biological window”), and the ability to release controlled quantities of copper in water. The desired antibacterial activity is thus based on two different mechanisms: (i) slow and sustained copper release from CuS NP-glass samples, (ii) local temperature increase caused by a photo-thermal effect under NIR laser irradiation of CuS NP–glass samples. This behavior allows promising in vivo applications to be foreseen, ensuring a “static” antibacterial protection tailored to fight bacterial adhesion in the critical timescale of possible infection and biofilm formation. This can be reinforced, when needed, by a photo-thermal action switchable on demand by an NIR light. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications)
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Article
Polymerization-Induced Phase Segregation and Self-Assembly of Siloxane Additives to Provide Thermoset Coatings with a Defined Surface Topology and Biocidal and Self-Cleaning Properties
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1610; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111610 - 13 Nov 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 938
Abstract
In this work, we report on the incorporation of a siloxane copolymer additive, poly((2-phenylethyl) methylsiloxane)-co(1-phenylethyl) methylsiloxane)-co-dimethylsiloxane), which is fully soluble at room temperature, in a rapid-cure thermoset polyester coating formulation. The additive undergoes polymerization-induced phase segregation (PIPS) to self-assemble on the coating surface [...] Read more.
In this work, we report on the incorporation of a siloxane copolymer additive, poly((2-phenylethyl) methylsiloxane)-co(1-phenylethyl) methylsiloxane)-co-dimethylsiloxane), which is fully soluble at room temperature, in a rapid-cure thermoset polyester coating formulation. The additive undergoes polymerization-induced phase segregation (PIPS) to self-assemble on the coating surface as discrete discoid nanofeatures during the resin cure process. Moreover, the copolymer facilitates surface co-segregation of titanium dioxide pigment microparticulate present in the coating. Depending on the composition, the coatings can display persistent superhydrophobicity and self-cleaning properties and, surprisingly, the titanium dioxide pigmented coatings that include the siloxane copolymer additive display high levels of antibacterial performance against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. This antibacterial performance is believed to be associated with the unique surface topology of these coatings, which comprise stimuli-responsive discoid nanofeatures. This paper provides details of the surface morphology of the coatings and how these relates to the antimicrobial properties of the coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications)
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in Surface Nanoengineering for Biofilm Prevention and Control. Part II: Active, Combined Active and Passive, and Smart Bacteria-Responsive Antibiofilm Nanocoatings
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(8), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10081527 - 04 Aug 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1275
Abstract
The second part of our review describing new achievements in the field of biofilm prevention and control, begins with a discussion of the active antibiofilm nanocoatings. We present the antibiofilm strategies based on antimicrobial agents that kill pathogens, inhibit their growth, or disrupt [...] Read more.
The second part of our review describing new achievements in the field of biofilm prevention and control, begins with a discussion of the active antibiofilm nanocoatings. We present the antibiofilm strategies based on antimicrobial agents that kill pathogens, inhibit their growth, or disrupt the molecular mechanisms of biofilm-associated increase in resistance and tolerance. These agents of various chemical structures act through a plethora of mechanisms targeting vital bacterial metabolic pathways or cellular structures like cell walls and cell membranes or interfering with the processes that underlie different stages of the biofilm life cycle. We illustrate the latter action mechanisms through inhibitors of the quorum sensing signaling pathway, inhibitors of cyclic-di-GMP signaling system, inhibitors of (p)ppGpp regulated stringent response, and disruptors of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substances matrix (EPS). Both main types of active antibiofilm surfaces, namely non-leaching or contact killing systems, which rely on the covalent immobilization of the antimicrobial agent on the surface of the coatings and drug-releasing systems in which the antimicrobial agent is physically entrapped in the bulk of the coatings, are presented, highlighting the advantages of each coating type in terms of antibacterial efficacy, biocompatibility, selective toxicity, as well as drawbacks and limitations. Developments regarding combined strategies that join in a unique platform, both passive and active elements are not omitted. In such platforms with dual functionality, passive and active strategies can be applied either simultaneously or sequentially. We especially emphasize those systems that can be reversely and repeatedly switched between the non-fouling status and the bacterial killing status, thereby allowing several bacteria-killing/surface regeneration cycles to be performed without significant loss of the initial bactericidal activity. Eventually, smart antibiofilm coatings that release their antimicrobial payload on demand, being activated by various triggers such as changes in local pH, temperature, or enzymatic triggers, are presented. Special emphasis is given to the most recent trend in the field of anti-infective surfaces, specifically smart self-defensive surfaces for which activation and switch to the bactericidal status are triggered by the pathogens themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications)
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Review
Recent Advances in Surface Nanoengineering for Biofilm Prevention and Control. Part I: Molecular Basis of Biofilm Recalcitrance. Passive Anti-Biofouling Nanocoatings
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061230 - 24 Jun 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
Medical device-associated infections are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, prompting researchers to find new, more effective ways to control the bacterial colonisation of surfaces and biofilm development. Bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of “emergent properties”, meaning those properties [...] Read more.
Medical device-associated infections are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, prompting researchers to find new, more effective ways to control the bacterial colonisation of surfaces and biofilm development. Bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of “emergent properties”, meaning those properties that are not predictable from the study of free-living bacterial cells. The social coordinated behaviour in the biofilm lifestyle involves intricate signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms underlying the gain in resistance and tolerance (recalcitrance) towards antimicrobial agents as compared to free-floating bacteria. Nanotechnology provides powerful tools to disrupt the processes responsible for recalcitrance development in all stages of the biofilm life cycle. The present paper is a state-of-the-art review of the surface nanoengineering strategies currently used to design antibiofilm coatings. The review is structurally organised in two parts according to the targeted biofilm life cycle stages and molecular mechanisms intervening in recalcitrance development. Therefore, in the present first part, we begin with a presentation of the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for increased recalcitrance that have to be disrupted. Further, we deal with passive surface nanoengineering strategies that aim to prevent bacterial cells from settling onto a biotic or abiotic surface. Both “fouling-resistant” and “fouling release” strategies are addressed as well as their synergic combination in a single unique nanoplatform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Nanomaterials Coating: Fabrication and Applications)
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