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Special Issue "New Frontiers on the Metabolism, Bioavailability and Health Effects of Phenolic Compounds II"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Pedro Mena

Department of Food & Drugs, Università degli studi di Parma (UNIPR), Parma, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | Website 3 | E-Mail
Interests: nutrition; phytochemicals; phenolic compounds; bioavailability; metabolism; disease prevention; liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry
Guest Editor
Dr. Rafael Llorach Asunción

Biomarkers & Nutrimetabolomic group, Nutrition, Food Sciences and Gastronomy Department, XaRTA, INSA, Campus Torribera, Pharmacy Faculty, University of Barcelona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nutrimetabolomics; food science; nutrition; phytochemicals; phenolic compounds; food metabolome; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to inform you that Molecules will launch the second part of the Special Issue “New Frontiers on the Metabolism, Bioavailability and Health Effects of Phenolic Compounds”.

With a fresh set of eyes and following the standards of a realistic research, this Special Issue should shed light on how (poly)phenolic substances are: (1) metabolized and turned into bioavailable molecules and (2) able to impact different biological processes related to human health. Phenolic compounds have shown promising health promotion features concerning the prevention of non-communicable diseases in epidemiological and human intervention studies. The elucidation of the metabolic fate of (poly)phenolic constituents and their bioavailability is a tipping point for fully unraveling the bioactive(s) responsible for phenolic compounds' demonstrated preventative effects on cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders, and certain kinds of cancer. There is a need for addressing: (1) the catabolism of phenolic compounds by the colonic microbiota and (2) the inter-individual differences in bioavailability and bioefficacy due to the diversity of microbiota composition. Moreover, future research should be focused on: (1) understanding the dose/phenolic intake–response relationship via pharmacokinetic studies and (2) evaluating proper biomarkers of intake. The design of nutritionally matched control–test foodstuffs is also required to conduct well‑controlled intervention studies in both animals and human subjects. In vitro investigations using physiologically achievable concentrations of (poly)phenol phase II metabolites with appropriate model test systems are also encouraged to provide adequate mechanistic insights. On the other hand, foodomics technologies (metabolomics, nutrigenomics, and proteomics) should be used to assess the role of phenolic bioactives from a comprehensive perspective. Likewise, any novel food-processing approach trying to enhance the bioavailability of (poly)phenols or sticking to what really happens after phenolic consumption should be taken into consideration. Finally, new communication channels and educational programs that are able to bring to the general public the well-defined biological properties of phenolics should be implemented. In conclusion, this Special Issue should review all aspects concerning the metabolism, bioavailability, and biological properties of (poly)phenolic compounds and discuss attempts to solve current critical gaps. Novel methodologies or out-of-the-box approaches can also complement the current knowledge and assist in the study of these plant bioactives.

Dr. Pedro Mena
Dr. Rafael Llorach Asunción
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Experimental realism
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Dietary plant bioactives
  • Colonic catabolism
  • Metabolomics
  • Phase II metabolites
  • Gut microbiota
  • Bioavailability
  • Bioactivity
  • Human intervention trials

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Metabolism of Stilbenoids by Human Faecal Microbiota
Molecules 2019, 24(6), 1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24061155
Received: 18 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 18 March 2019 / Published: 23 March 2019
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Abstract
Stilbenoids are dietary phenolics with notable biological effects on humans. Epidemiological, clinical, and nutritional studies from recent years have confirmed the significant biological effects of stilbenoids, such as oxidative stress protection and the prevention of degenerative diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative [...] Read more.
Stilbenoids are dietary phenolics with notable biological effects on humans. Epidemiological, clinical, and nutritional studies from recent years have confirmed the significant biological effects of stilbenoids, such as oxidative stress protection and the prevention of degenerative diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Stilbenoids are intensively metabolically transformed by colon microbiota, and their corresponding metabolites might show different or stronger biological activity than their parent molecules. The aim of the present study was to determine the metabolism of six stilbenoids (resveratrol, oxyresveratrol, piceatannol, thunalbene, batatasin III, and pinostilbene), mediated by colon microbiota. Stilbenoids were fermented in an in vitro faecal fermentation system using fresh faeces from five different donors as an inoculum. The samples of metabolized stilbenoids were collected at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 h. Significant differences in the microbial transformation among stilbene derivatives were observed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Four stilbenoids (resveratrol, oxyresveratrol, piceatannol and thunalbene) were metabolically transformed by double bond reduction, dihydroxylation, and demethylation, while batatasin III and pinostilbene were stable under conditions simulating the colon environment. Strong inter-individual differences in speed, intensity, and pathways of metabolism were observed among the faecal samples obtained from the donors. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Selected Stilbenoids on Human Fecal Microbiota
Molecules 2019, 24(4), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24040744
Received: 17 January 2019 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
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Abstract
Dietary phenolics or polyphenols are mostly metabolized by the human gut microbiota. These metabolites appear to confer the beneficial health effects attributed to phenolics. Microbial composition affects the type of metabolites produced. Reciprocally, phenolics modulate microbial composition. Understanding this relationship could be used [...] Read more.
Dietary phenolics or polyphenols are mostly metabolized by the human gut microbiota. These metabolites appear to confer the beneficial health effects attributed to phenolics. Microbial composition affects the type of metabolites produced. Reciprocally, phenolics modulate microbial composition. Understanding this relationship could be used to positively impact health by phenolic supplementation and thus create favorable colonic conditions. This study explored the effect of six stilbenoids (batatasin III, oxyresveratrol, piceatannol, pinostilbene, resveratrol, thunalbene) on the gut microbiota composition. Stilbenoids were anaerobically fermented with fecal bacteria from four donors, samples were collected at 0 and 24 h, and effects on the microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Statistical tests identified affected microbes at three taxonomic levels. Observed microbial composition modulation by stilbenoids included a decrease in the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio, a decrease in the relative abundance of strains from the genus Clostridium, and effects on the family Lachnospiraceae. A frequently observed effect was a further decrease of the relative abundance when compared to the control. An opposite effect to the control was observed for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, whose relative abundance increased. Observed effects were more frequently attributed to resveratrol and piceatannol, followed by thunalbene and batatasin III. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Roles of Phenolic Compounds in the Reduction of Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Diseases
Molecules 2019, 24(2), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24020366
Received: 13 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 12 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
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Abstract
The population is now living longer during the period classified as “elderly” (60 years and older), exhibiting multimorbidity associated to the lengthening of the average life span. The dietary intake of phenolic compounds (PC) may affect the physiology, disease development and progression during [...] Read more.
The population is now living longer during the period classified as “elderly” (60 years and older), exhibiting multimorbidity associated to the lengthening of the average life span. The dietary intake of phenolic compounds (PC) may affect the physiology, disease development and progression during the aging process, reducing risk factors of age related diseases. The aim of this review is to briefly describe some of the possible effects of a series of PC on the reduction of risk factors of the onset of cardiovascular diseases, considering their potential mechanisms of action. The main actions described for PC are associated with reduced platelet activity, anti-inflammatory effects, and the protection from oxidation to reduce LDL and the generation of advanced glycation end products. Preclinical and clinical evidence of the physiological effects of various PC is presented, as well as the health claims approved by regulatory agencies. Full article
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