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Special Issue "Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Sanjay Garg

School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: controlled drug delivery; nanoparticles; targeted therapy; anticancer drug delivery systems; nanotechnology; antibacterials for superbugs; wound healing; veterinary formulations
Guest Editor
Dr. Usha Y Nayak

Department of Pharmaceutics, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MCOPS), Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka-576104, India
Website | E-Mail
Interests: controlled drug delivery; polymeric nanoparticles; liposomes; nanoemulsions; lipid nanoparticles; chronotherapeutics; solubility enhancement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocarriers are widely explored systems for diagnostic and various drug delivery applications. Among the controlled drug delivery technologies, targeted drug delivery has attracted the attention of researchers, as it comprises the systemic delivery of the drug-carrier system to specific cell types, tissues, or organs. Multifunctional capabilities of nanocarriers make them suitable for the targeted delivery of drugs with diverse nature, including proteins, peptides, or DNA. Polymeric/lipid-based nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanofibres, and carbon nanotubes are a few examples of nanocarriers which are used extensively. The surface of the nanoparticles is modified or conjugated with the suitable ligands for targetingin order to minimise the opsonization and to prolong the circulation time. Targeted nanoparticulate delivery would mainly be beneficial in diseases like cancer and diseases related to the brain.

In this Special Issue, articles are invited to provide a recent insight into the nanocarriers which are useful for targeted drug delivery.

Prof. Sanjay Garg
Dr. Usha Y Nayak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dug delivery
  • targeting
  • nanoparticles
  • functionalization
  • conjugation
  • cancer therapy
  • brain targeting
  • lymphatic targeting
  • hepatic targeting

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Localized In Situ Nanoemulgel Drug Delivery System of Quercetin for Periodontitis: Development and Computational Simulations
Molecules 2018, 23(6), 1363; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23061363
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 3 June 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6026 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study was aimed at formulating a bioabsorbable, controlled-release, nanoemulgel of Quercetin, a potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of periodontitis that could improve its solubility and bioavailability. Screening of components was carried out based on the solubility studies. Nanoemulsion containing
[...] Read more.
This study was aimed at formulating a bioabsorbable, controlled-release, nanoemulgel of Quercetin, a potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of periodontitis that could improve its solubility and bioavailability. Screening of components was carried out based on the solubility studies. Nanoemulsion containing cinnamon oil as the oil phase, tween 80 and Carbitol® as the surfactant-cosurfactant mixture (Smix) and water as the aqueous phase containing 125 µg/200 µL of Quercetin was prepared by using spontaneous emulsification method. Nanoemulgel was prepared using 23% w/v poloxamer 407 as gel base. Comprehensive evaluation of the formulated nanoemulgel was carried out, and the optimized formulation was studied for drug release using Franz vertical diffusion cells. The formulated nanoemulgelexhibited a remarkable release of 92.4% of Quercetin at the end of 6 h, as compared to that of pure Quercetin-loaded gel (<3% release). The viscosity of the prepared nanoemulgel was found to be 30,647 ± 0.32 cPs at 37 °C. Also, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was utilized to understand the gelation process and role of each component in the formulation. The present study revealed that the developed nanoemulgel of Quercetin could be a potential delivery system for clinical testing in periodontitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Design and Efficacy of Nanogels Formulations for Intranasal Administration
Molecules 2018, 23(6), 1241; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23061241
Received: 4 April 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
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Abstract
Nanogels are drug delivery systems that can bypass the blood-brain barrier and deliver drugs to the desired site when administered intranasally. They have been used as a drug delivery platform for the management of brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, migraine, schizophrenia and
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Nanogels are drug delivery systems that can bypass the blood-brain barrier and deliver drugs to the desired site when administered intranasally. They have been used as a drug delivery platform for the management of brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, migraine, schizophrenia and depression. nanogels have also been developed as vaccine carriers for the protection of bacterial infections such as influenza, meningitis, pneumonia and as veterinary vaccine carriers for the protection of animals from encephalomyelitis and mouth to foot disease. It has been developed as vaccine carriers for the prevention of lifestyle disease such as obesity. Intranasal administration of therapeutics using nanogels for the management of brain diseases revealed that the drug transportation was via the olfactory nerve pathway resulting in rapid drug delivery to the brain with excellent neuroprotective effect. The application of nanogels as vaccine carriers also induced significant responses associated with protective immunity against selected bacterial and viral infections. This review provides a detailed information on the enhanced therapeutic effects, mechanisms and biological efficacy of nanogels for intranasal administration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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Open AccessReview Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Targeting with Tumor Homing Peptides
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1190; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051190
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
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Abstract
Over recent decades multiple therapeutic approaches have been explored for improved management of peritoneally disseminated malignancies—a grim condition known as peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Intraperitoneal (IP) administration can be used to achieve elevated local concentration and extended half-life of the drugs in the peritoneal
[...] Read more.
Over recent decades multiple therapeutic approaches have been explored for improved management of peritoneally disseminated malignancies—a grim condition known as peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Intraperitoneal (IP) administration can be used to achieve elevated local concentration and extended half-life of the drugs in the peritoneal cavity to improve their anticancer efficacy. However, IP-administered chemotherapeutics have a short residence time in the IP space, and are not tumor selective. An increasing body of work suggests that functionalization of drugs and nanoparticles with targeting peptides increases their peritoneal retention and provides a robust and specific tumor binding and penetration that translates into improved therapeutic response. Here we review the progress in affinity targeting of intraperitoneal anticancer compounds, imaging agents and nanoparticles with tumor-homing peptides. We review classes of tumor-homing peptides relevant for PC targeting, payloads for peptide-guided precision delivery, applications for targeted compounds, and the effects of nanoformulation of drugs and imaging agents on affinity-based tumor delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Nanotechnological Strategies for Protein Delivery
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1008; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051008
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 22 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1622 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of therapeutic proteins plays a fundamental role in the treatment of numerous diseases. The low physico-chemical stability of proteins in physiological conditions put their function at risk in the human body until they reach their target. Moreover, several proteins are unable
[...] Read more.
The use of therapeutic proteins plays a fundamental role in the treatment of numerous diseases. The low physico-chemical stability of proteins in physiological conditions put their function at risk in the human body until they reach their target. Moreover, several proteins are unable to cross the cell membrane. All these facts strongly hinder their therapeutic effect. Nanomedicine has emerged as a powerful tool which can provide solutions to solve these limitations and improve the efficacy of treatments based on protein administration. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of different types of strategies employed for protein delivery, such as PEGylation, transport within liposomes or inorganic nanoparticles or their in situ encapsulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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Open AccessReview Liposomal Drug Delivery Systems and Anticancer Drugs
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 907; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040907
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 29 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 April 2018 / Published: 14 April 2018
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Abstract
Cancer is a life-threatening disease contributing to ~3.4 million deaths worldwide. There are various causes of cancer, such as smoking, being overweight or obese, intake of processed meat, radiation, family history, stress, environmental factors, and chance. The first-line treatment of cancer is the
[...] Read more.
Cancer is a life-threatening disease contributing to ~3.4 million deaths worldwide. There are various causes of cancer, such as smoking, being overweight or obese, intake of processed meat, radiation, family history, stress, environmental factors, and chance. The first-line treatment of cancer is the surgical removal of solid tumours, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. The systemic administration of the free drug is considered to be the main clinical failure of chemotherapy in cancer treatment, as limited drug concentration reaches the tumour site. Most of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) used in chemotherapy are highly cytotoxic to both cancer and normal cells. Accordingly, targeting the tumour vasculatures is essential for tumour treatment. In this context, encapsulation of anti-cancer drugs within the liposomal system offers secure platforms for the targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs for the treatment of cancer. This, in turn, can be helpful for reducing the cytotoxic side effects of anti-cancer drugs on normal cells. This short-review focuses on the use of liposomes in anti-cancer drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Cancer Targeting and Drug Delivery Using Carbon-Based Quantum Dots and Nanotubes
Molecules 2018, 23(2), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23020378
Received: 19 January 2018 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 February 2018 / Published: 10 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4316 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently cancer treatment is in large part non-specific with respect to treatment. Medication is often harsh on patients, whereby they suffer several undesired side effects as a result. Carbon-based nanoparticles have attracted attention in recent years due to their ability to act as
[...] Read more.
Currently cancer treatment is in large part non-specific with respect to treatment. Medication is often harsh on patients, whereby they suffer several undesired side effects as a result. Carbon-based nanoparticles have attracted attention in recent years due to their ability to act as a platform for the attachment of several drugs and/or ligands. Relatively simple models are often used in cancer research, wherein carbon nanoparticles are conjugated to a ligand that is specific to an overexpressed receptor for imaging and drug delivery in cancer treatment. These carbon nanoparticles confer unique properties to the imaging or delivery vehicle due to their nontoxic nature and their high fluorescence qualities. Chief among the ongoing research within carbon-based nanoparticles emerge carbon dots (C-dots) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In this review, the aforementioned carbon nanoparticles will be discussed in their use within doxorubicin and gemcitabine based drug delivery vehicles, as well as the ligand-mediated receptor specific targeted therapy. Further directions of research in current field are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Drug Delivery and Nanocarriers)
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