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Special Issue "Physicochemical Properties of Food"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Adam Figiel Website E-Mail
Head of the Department of Thermal Technology and Process Engineering, Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chelmonskiego 37a, 51-630 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: food science and technology; physicochemical properties; food processing and engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. Anna Michalska Website E-Mail
The Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Science, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chelmonskiego 37/41, 51-630 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: drying technology; food preservation; food engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The editorial board of Molecules invites you to submit an article to a Special Issue entitled ‘Physicochemical Properties of Food’. Among different quality aspects of food products, physical and chemical properties together play an important role due to their significant impact on the bioactive potential and sensory attributes which influence consumer acceptance. Biological raw materials have native physicochemical properties that can be modified during processing, leading to  changes in and providing the specific functions of the obtained food products. The modification of the physicochemical properties of biological materials comprises structural changes and alterations in chemical composition under the influence of external factors such as temperature, pressure and numerous treatments including microwaving, sonication or chemical fortification. All these actions effect the final physicochemical properties of food products. The most important from the scientific point of view are physical and chemical relationships within the food product occurring at the molecular level. The explanation and modeling of these relationships is crucial for the design of high-quality functional food, showing not only high nutritional value and a desired sensory profile, but also health-promoting properties. Therefore the results of research works dealing with the interactions between the physical and chemical properties of food during its preparation and storage are especially anticipated, considering the possibility of solving contemporary problems related to food and nutrition. The manuscripts submitted may be original research papers describing complete investigations or review articles highlighting recent achievements regarding the modification of the physicochemical properties of food products.

Prof. Dr. Adam Figiel
Dr. Anna Michalska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemical composition
  • Functional compounds
  • Bioactivity
  • Volatiles
  • Color
  • Water activity
  • Sorption isotherms
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electric properties
  • Texture
  • Rheology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Effects of Seasonal Variability on the Physicochemical, Biochemical, and Nutritional Composition of Western Peninsular Malaysia Gracilaria manilaensis
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3298; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183298 - 10 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study evaluated the effect of seasonal variation on the physicochemical, biochemical, and nutritional composition of Gracilaria manilaensis. Sampling was designed during the main monsoon seasons in Malaysia—the Southwest monsoon (SWM) and Northeast monsoon (NEM)—to understand the intraspecific variation (p < [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the effect of seasonal variation on the physicochemical, biochemical, and nutritional composition of Gracilaria manilaensis. Sampling was designed during the main monsoon seasons in Malaysia—the Southwest monsoon (SWM) and Northeast monsoon (NEM)—to understand the intraspecific variation (p < 0.05). Carbohydrates, protein, and dietary fiber were found to be higher in NEM–G. manilaensis, whereas a higher ash content was quantified in SWM–G. manilaensis. No significant differences were found in crude lipid and moisture content (p > 0.05). Vitamin B2 was calculated as (0.29 ± 0.06 mg 100 g−1) and (0.38 ± 0.06 mg 100 g−1) for the NEM and SWM samples, respectively (p < 0.05). The fatty acid profile showed the dominance of saturated fatty acids (SFAs)—palmitic acids, stearic acid, and myristic acid—while the mineral contents were found to be good sources of calcium (1750.97–4047.74 mg 100 g−1) and iron (1512.55–1346.05 mg 100 g−1). Tryptophan and lysine were recorded as the limiting essential amino acids (EAAs) in NEM G. manilaensis, while leucine and phenylalanine were found to be the limiting EAAs in the SWM samples. None of the extracts exhibited antibacterial properties against the screened strains. The study concluded that seasonal changes have a great effect on the biochemical composition of G. manilaensis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Properties of Food)
Open AccessArticle
Study on the Volatile Organic Compounds and Its Correlation with Water Dynamics of Bigeye Tuna (Thunnus obesus) during Cold Storage
Molecules 2019, 24(17), 3119; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173119 - 28 Aug 2019
Abstract
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and water play a key role in evaluating the quality of aquatic products. Quality deterioration of aquatic products can produce some off-odour volatiles and can induce water content changes. However, no previous study has investigated a correlation between water [...] Read more.
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and water play a key role in evaluating the quality of aquatic products. Quality deterioration of aquatic products can produce some off-odour volatiles and can induce water content changes. However, no previous study has investigated a correlation between water dynamics and VOCs of bigeye tuna during cold storage. The changes in VOCs, water dynamics and quality attributes of bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) upon storage at 0 °C and 4 °C for 6 days were investigated. The results showed that the values of ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), T21 (trapped water) and the relative value of T1 decreased (p < 0.05), while drip loss and histamine contents increased (p < 0.05), which indicated quality deterioration during cold storage. With haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, muscle tissue microstructure was observed. VOCs such as hexanal, heptanal, 4-Heptenal, (Z)-, pentadecanal-, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol significantly increased, which sharply increased the content of off-odour volatiles. T21 was positively correlated with 1-octen-3-ol, 1-penten-3-ol, while T21 was negatively correlated with hexanal, 1-hexanol. Therefore, good correlations between water dynamics and some VOCs were detected during quality deterioration of bigeye tuna throughout cold storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Properties of Food)
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Open AccessArticle
Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of Heat-Induced Changes in Polyphenols and Antioxidant Capacity in Prunus domestica L. By-products
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 3008; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24163008 - 19 Aug 2019
Abstract
Plum pomace, an agro-industrial waste product has received attention due to the worldwide popularity of plums. During convection, the content of flavan-3-ols decrease, except drying at 90 °C, whereas the content of i.e., chlorogenic, 3-p- and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, quercetin [...] Read more.
Plum pomace, an agro-industrial waste product has received attention due to the worldwide popularity of plums. During convection, the content of flavan-3-ols decrease, except drying at 90 °C, whereas the content of i.e., chlorogenic, 3-p- and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, quercetin rutinoside, and galactoside was observed to increase along with the increase in process temperature. The highest content of all identified polyphenols was found in plum pomace powders obtained using a combination of convective at 90 °C and microwave vacuum drying (MVD) at 120 W, whereas the highest retention of the group consisted of phenolic acids, flavonols, and anthocyanins was noted when CD 70 °C/MVD 120 W was used, pointing to a strong influence of the type of polyphenols on their changes caused by drying. The correlations between TEAC ABTS and the sum of flavonoids (r = 0.634) and anthocyanins (r = 0.704) were established. The multiple regression analysis showed that polyphenol content was more strongly affected by drying time than by maximum temperature, whereas antioxidant capacity was more influenced by maximum temperature of sample than by drying time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Properties of Food)
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