E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Food-Derived Nanomaterials: Preparations, Characterizations, and Applications"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Yangchao Luo

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; hydrogels; nanoparticles; encapsulation; controlled delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food nanotechnology is an area of emerging interest and opens up numerous possibilities for the food industry, including (but not limited to) improving food safety, extending shelf life, improving texture and taste, and enhancing bioavailability of poorly-absorbed nutrients. However, exploitation of synthetic nanomaterials in food is often associated with major safety concern for potential long-term and latent side effects on human health and environment. Therefore, over the last decade, exhaustive efforts have been made to discover food-derived nanomaterials that can be explored in developing nanoscale systems with potential applications in the food industry. By unraveling the physical and chemical properties of food ingredients, scientists have deciphered many nanostructures that are either naturally present in foods or can be fabricated using natural biomaterials under facile conditions. In particular, polysaccharides, proteins and lipids are the three major food biomaterials, and with the advancement of the preparation and characterization of their nanostructures, various novel nanoscale systems have been continuously developed for food applications.

In this Special Issue, we invite investigators to contribute short communications, full research articles, and timely reviews that are related to the preparations, characterizations, and applications of food-derived nanomaterials. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Discovery of novel nanostructures in food biomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanocrystals, etc.
  • Characterization of molecular interactions among food biomaterials at the dimension of nanoscale
  • Innovative techniques to fabricate nanoscale systems for food-related applications, such as encapsulation and oral delivery
  • Development of nanocomposites from a combination of food-derived biomaterials and inorganic nanomaterials, including metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, clay nanosheets, and others.
  • In vitro and in vivo evaluations of nanoscale systems prepared with food-derived nanomaterial

Dr. Yangchao Luo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food nanotechnology
  • Polysaccharide
  • Protein
  • Lipid
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanoemulsions
  • Micelles
  • Nanofibers
  • Nanocomposites
  • Self-assembly
  • Colloids
  • Encapsulation
  • Delivery
  • Bioavailability
  • Food safety
  • Food packaging
  • Shelf-life extension

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Physicochemical Properties and Cellular Uptake of Astaxanthin-Loaded Emulsions
Molecules 2019, 24(4), 727; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24040727
Received: 24 December 2018 / Revised: 10 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 18 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Astaxanthin, a natural pigment carotenoid, is well known for its potential benefits to human health. However, its applications in the food industry are limited, due to its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. Six different emulsifiers were used to prepare astaxanthin-loaded emulsions, including whey [...] Read more.
Astaxanthin, a natural pigment carotenoid, is well known for its potential benefits to human health. However, its applications in the food industry are limited, due to its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. Six different emulsifiers were used to prepare astaxanthin-loaded emulsions, including whey protein isolate (WPI), polymerized whey protein (PWP), WPI-lecithin, PWP-lecithin, lecithin, and Tween20. The droplet size, zeta potential, storage stability, cytotoxicity, and astaxanthin uptake by Caco-2 cells were all investigated. The results showed that the droplet size of the emulsions ranged from 194 to 287 nm, depending on the type of emulsifier used. The entrapment efficiency of astaxanthin was as high as 90%. The astaxanthin-loaded emulsions showed good physicochemical stability during storage at 4 °C. The emulsifier type had a significant impact on the degradation rate of astaxanthin (p < 0.05). Cellular uptake of astaxanthin encapsulated into the emulsions was significantly higher than free astaxanthin (p < 0.05). Emulsion stabilized with WPI had the highest cellular uptake of astaxanthin (10.0 ± 0.2%), followed, in order, by that with PWP (8.49 ± 0.1%), WPI-lecithin (5.97 ± 0.1%), PWP-lecithin (5.05 ± 0.1%), lecithin (3.37 ± 0.2%), and Tween 20 (2.1 ± 0.1%). Results indicate that the whey protein-based emulsion has a high potential for improving the cellular uptake of astaxanthin. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Physicochemical and Microstructural Properties of Polymerized Whey Protein Encapsulated 3,3′-Diindolylmethane Nanoparticles
Molecules 2019, 24(4), 702; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24040702
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
PDF Full-text (4368 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The fat-soluble antioxidant 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), is a natural phytochemical found in Brassica vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. The stability of this compound is a major challenge for its applications. Polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based DIM nanoparticles were prepared at different mass [...] Read more.
The fat-soluble antioxidant 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), is a natural phytochemical found in Brassica vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. The stability of this compound is a major challenge for its applications. Polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based DIM nanoparticles were prepared at different mass ratios of protein and DIM by mixing PWP and DIM followed by ultrasound treatment for 4 min. All the nanoparticles were studied for particle size, zeta potential, rheological and microstructural properties, and storage stability. The mean particle size of the PWP-based nanoparticles was significantly increased (p < 0.05) by the addition of DIM at different mass ratios, ranging from 241.33 ± 14.82 to 270.57 ± 15.28 nm. Zeta potential values of all nanoparticles were highly negative (greater than ±30 mV), suggesting a stable solution due its electrostatic repulsive forces. All samples exhibited shear thinning behavior (n < 1), fitted with Sisko model (R2 > 0.997). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)spectra revealed that the secondary structure was changed and the absorption intensity for hydrogen bonding got stronger by further incorporating DIM into PWP. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) images showed spherical and smooth surface shape of the PWP-based nanoparticles. DIM encapsulated by PWP showed enhanced stability at 4, 37 and 55 °C for 15 days evidenced by changes in mean particle size and color (a*-value and b*-value) compared with control (DIM only). In conclusion, the polymerized whey protein based 3,3′-diindolylmethane nanoparticles are stable and the encapsulation may protect the core material from oxidation. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top