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Special Issue "Analysis of Xenobiotics and their Residues in Food, Biological and Environmental Samples by Chromatographic Techniques Coupled with Modern Detection Techniques"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Tomasz Tuzimski (Ph.D., Adjunct Professor)

Medical University of Lublin, Faculty of Pharmacy with Medical Analytics Division, Chair of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, 4A Chodźki Street, PL-20093 Lublin, Poland
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Interests: theory and application of liquid chromatography; modern extraction techniques (eg., QuEChERS); detection techniques (DAD, FLD, MS, MS/MS); method development and validation; optimisation of chromatographic systems for separation and quantitative analysis of xenobiotics and others (multicomponent mixtures) in food, environmental and biological samples

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In their daily life, humans constantly encounter a huge amount of different substances, including xenobiotics, which are typically synthetic chemicals that are foreign to the body and/or to an ecological system. Xenobiotics can exert adverse effects on human health and increase the incidence of chronic diseases, including cancer, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, cardiovascular, chronic kidney disease, and others. As a consequence, the development and validation of analytical methods for xenobiotics has become essential.

The choice of an appropriate extraction and analytical method for separation and final determination is closely related to the properties of the target compounds and matrices.

Common steps of sample treatment in most of the analytical methods reported for mixtures of xenobiotics and derivatives include sample pretreatment, extraction of analytes from the matrix, clean-up of the extracts to remove interferences, and concentration to achieve the desired sensitivity. Incontestable progress has been made during the past years regarding the development of techniques for the preparation of samples for analysis such as QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe), Solid Phase Extraction (SPE), Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME), Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE), Hallow-Fiber Liquid Phase Microextraction (HFLPME), Dispersive Liquid–Liquid Microextraction (DLLME) or Focused Ultrasonic Solid-Liquid Extraction (FUSLE), and others.

The challenge for the analyst is to develop effective and validated analytical strategies for the analysis of hundreds of different xenobiotics on hundreds of different sample types, quickly, accurately and at acceptable cost. The most efficient approach to xenobiotic analysis involves the use of chromatographic methods. The following chromatographic methods are most frequently applied in environmental/biological samples and food analysis: high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and multidimensional chromatographic techniques.

This Special Issue will present in a structured manner state-of-the-art information on the very important field of high-performance chromatographic techniques coupled with modern detection techniques, i.e., high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). It is a well-established fact that chromatographic techniques with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) find broad application in the separation, identification, and quantification of important components such as xenobiotics (drugs and veterinary drugs, vitamins, dyes, mycotoxins, environmental bioindicators, allergens, and others).

I warmly invite our colleagues to submit their original contributions to this Special Issue in order to provide updates regarding chromatographic methods for xenobiotics analysis of food, biological and environmental samples that will be of interest to our readers.

I would be delighted if you could respond to confirm your contribution and the proposed title by 30 June 2019 to assist in planning the whole project. In the case of review articles, an additional brief (1–2 page) description of the topic including a draft index is required. This preliminary step is essential to avoid the overlapping of topics. The degree of novelty and the significance of the research will be scrutinized prior to the peer-review process.

Dr. Tomasz Tuzimski (Ph.D., Adjunct Professor)
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • xenobiotics (drugs and veterinary drugs, vitamins, dyes, mycotoxins, environmental bioindicators, allergens, pesticides, and others)
  • extraction techniques (QuEChERS/d-SPE, SPE, SPME, SBSE, HFLPME, DLLME, FUSLE, and others)
  • chromatographic methods (HPLC, UPLC, GC, GC x GC, and others)
  • detection techniques (DAD, FLD, MS, MS/MS, and others)

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Determination of Urinary Pterins by Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with LED-Induced Fluorescence Detector
Molecules 2019, 24(6), 1166; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24061166
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 21 March 2019 / Published: 24 March 2019
PDF Full-text (845 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Urinary pterins have been found as potential biomarkers in many pathophysiological conditions including inflammation, viral infections, and cancer. However, pterins determination in biological samples is difficult due to their degradation under exposure to air, light, and heat. Besides, they occur at shallow concentration [...] Read more.
Urinary pterins have been found as potential biomarkers in many pathophysiological conditions including inflammation, viral infections, and cancer. However, pterins determination in biological samples is difficult due to their degradation under exposure to air, light, and heat. Besides, they occur at shallow concentration levels, and thus, standard UV detectors cannot be used without additional sample preconcentration. On the other hand, ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection can be used since pterins exhibit native fluorescence. The main factor that limits an everyday use of LIF detectors is its high price. Here, an alternative detector, i.e., light-emitted diode induced fluorescence (LEDIF) detector, was evaluated for the determination of pterins in urine samples after capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation. An optimized method was validated in terms of linearity range, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), intra- and interday precision and accuracy, sample stability in the autosampler, and sample stability during the freezing/thawing cycle. The obtained LOD (0.1 µM) and LOQ (0.3 µM) values were three-order of magnitude lower compared to UV detector, and two orders of magnitude higher compared to previously reported house-built LIF detector. The applicability of the validated method was demonstrated in the analysis of urine samples from healthy individuals and cancer patients. Full article
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