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Special Issue "Self-Healing Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Shan-hui Hsu

Distinguished Professor and Director, Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; smart polymers; self-healing hydrogels; tissue engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. Martin D. Hager

Laboratory of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry (IOMC), Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, 07743 Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: self-healing polymers; polymers for energy (polymer solar cells as well as polymer-based batteries)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,     

Smart materials have become an attractive topic in molecular science and engineering. These materials are able to respond to their environmental conditions or external stimuli.

Self-healing materials are one type of smart material, and have the ability to partially restore their properties/functionality after repeated damage.

Due to this outstanding ability, these materials are interesting candidates for many different application areas. For instance, in biomedicine they can be employed to release biological molecules in order to promote wound healing or to serve as drug/cell therapeutic vehicles. Moreover, self-healing materials are interesting construction materials, and may find application in asphalt and concrete. In addition, self-healing polymers can be utilized as coatings.      

This Special Issue of Molecules will cover recent progress in the development of self-healing materials over different material classes. All researchers active in the area are encouraged to contribute articles on the design and fabrication of novel self-healing materials as well as their applications in, for example, sensing, coatings, construction, and drug release.  

Prof. Shan-hui Hsu
Dr. Martin D. Hager
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • self-healing materials
    • self-healing asphalt
    • self-healing ceramics
    • self-healing concrete
    • self-healing metals
    • self-healing polymers and composites
  • smart materials
  • self-repair/healable materials
  • reversible crosslinks
  • application areas: biomedicine, construction materials, coatings, composites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Interface Characterization Between Polyethylene/ Silica in Engineered Cementitious Composites by Molecular Dynamics Simulation
Molecules 2019, 24(8), 1497; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081497
Received: 16 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
Polyethylene is widely adopted in engineered cementitious composites to control the crack width. A clearer knowledge of the PE/concrete interfacial properties is important in developing engineered cementitious composites, which can lead to a limited crack width. Tensile failure and adhesion properties of the [...] Read more.
Polyethylene is widely adopted in engineered cementitious composites to control the crack width. A clearer knowledge of the PE/concrete interfacial properties is important in developing engineered cementitious composites, which can lead to a limited crack width. Tensile failure and adhesion properties of the amorphous polyethylene/silica (PE/S) interface are investigated by molecular dynamics to interpret the PE/concrete interface. The influence of the PE chain length, the PE chain number and coupling agents applied on silica surface on the interfacial adhesion is studied. An increase of the adhesion strength of the modified silica surface by coupling agents compared with the unmodified silica is found. The failure process, density profile and potential energy evolutions of the PE/S interface are studied. The thermodynamic work of adhesion that quantifies the interfacial adhesion of the PE/S interface is evaluated. The present study helps to understand the interfacial adhesion behavior between ECC and PE, and is expected to contribute to restricting the crack width. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Healing Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Healable Waterborne Polyurethanes with Cystamine Chain Extenders
Molecules 2019, 24(8), 1492; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081492
Received: 19 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 15 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
PDF Full-text (3548 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study, environmentally friendly, self-healing waterborne polyurethanes (WPUs) were prepared based on the disulfide metathesis reaction in cystamine. The cystamine acted as a chain extender in the WPU film, which showed a high mechanical strength of 19.1 MPa. The possibility of self-healing [...] Read more.
In this study, environmentally friendly, self-healing waterborne polyurethanes (WPUs) were prepared based on the disulfide metathesis reaction in cystamine. The cystamine acted as a chain extender in the WPU film, which showed a high mechanical strength of 19.1 MPa. The possibility of self-healing reaction was simultaneously modeled via liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). WPU was confirmed to self-heal a surface crack thermally after a scratch test, and the efficiency was measured by comparing the mechanical properties before and after a cut-and-healing test. In addition, the disulfide-thiol exchange reaction was confirmed to occur in WPU with cystamine as a chain extender and 2-mercaptoethanol. Hot press tests confirmed the possibility of reprocessing the WPU. The WPU incorporating disulfide groups showed great potential as a smart self-healing material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Healing Materials)
Figures

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