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Special Issue "Food Traceability and Authenticity within Analytical Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rise of globalization and complex distribution systems, there has been an increase in food product counterfeiting. Food adulteration, which is mostly economically motivated, can have serious impacts and even detrimental consequences on the health of its consumers. The international community uses a collective approach to cope with food fraud in which all stakeholders in the food supply chain are certified and qualified (excluding those who do not meet the applicable standards), and foods are monitored in real-time. However, there is a need for a plan of action that takes the perspectives of the food industry and consumers into account. Available technologies for the detection of food fraud are mainly based on profiling and fingerprinting methods. In this section, we deal with future research areas, not only related to food adulterers but also to food safety and climate change, and the need to develop interdisciplinary approaches to contemporary problems.

Prof. Dr. Jesus Simal-Gandara
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • traceability
  • authenticity
  • fraud detection
  • analytical chemistry
  • biomarkers
  • profiling
  • fingerprinting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Volatilome of Chill-Stored European Seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Fillets and Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Slices under Modified Atmosphere Packaging
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1981; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081981 - 23 Apr 2020
Abstract
Fish spoilage occurs due to production of metabolites during storage, from bacterial action and chemical reactions, which leads to sensory rejection. Investigating the volatilome profile can reveal the potential spoilage markers. The evolution of volatile organic molecules during storage of European seabass ( [...] Read more.
Fish spoilage occurs due to production of metabolites during storage, from bacterial action and chemical reactions, which leads to sensory rejection. Investigating the volatilome profile can reveal the potential spoilage markers. The evolution of volatile organic molecules during storage of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) fillets and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) slices under modified atmosphere packaging at 2 °C was recorded by solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), microbiological, and sensory changes were also monitored. The shelf life of seabass fillets and salmon slices was 10.5 days. Pseudomonas and H2S-producing bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in both fish. TVB-N increased from the middle of storage, but never reached concentrations higher than the regulatory limit of 30–35 mg N/100 g. The volatilome consisted of a number of aldehydes, ketones, alcohols and esters, common to both fish species. However, different evolution patterns were observed, indicating the effect of fish substrate on microbial growth and eventually the generation of volatiles. The compounds 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 2,3-butanediol, 2,3-butanedione and acetic acid could be proposed as potential spoilage markers. The identification and quantification of the volatilities of specific fish species via the development of a database with the fingerprint of fish species stored under certain storage conditions can help towards rapid spoilage assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Traceability and Authenticity within Analytical Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle
An Effective Method of Isolating Honey Proteins
Molecules 2019, 24(13), 2399; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24132399 - 29 Jun 2019
Abstract
Honey is a natural sweetener composed mostly of sugars, but it contains also pollen grains, proteins, free amino acids, and minerals. The amounts and proportions of these components depend on the honey type and bee species. Despite the low content of honey protein, [...] Read more.
Honey is a natural sweetener composed mostly of sugars, but it contains also pollen grains, proteins, free amino acids, and minerals. The amounts and proportions of these components depend on the honey type and bee species. Despite the low content of honey protein, they are becoming a popular study object, and have recently been used as markers of the authenticity and quality of honey. Currently, the most popular methods of protein isolation from honey are dialysis against distilled water, lyophilization of dialysate, or various precipitation protocols. In this work, we propose a new method based on saturated phenol. We tested it on three popular polish honey types and we proved its compatibility with both 1D and 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and MS (mass spectrometry) techniques. The elaborated technique is also potentially less expensive and less time-consuming than other previously described methods, while being equally effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Traceability and Authenticity within Analytical Chemistry)
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