Special Issue "Micromachines for Dielectrophoresis"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "C:Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
Interests: micromanufacturing; biomanufacturing; carbonaceous materials; electrokinetics; microfluidics; bacteria; composites; healthcare diagnostics; multicultural collaboration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dielectrophoresis (DEP) remains an effective technique for the label-free identification and manipulation of targeted particles. Applications are numerous, ranging from clinical diagnostics and therapeutics to advanced manufacturing. This Special Issue emphasizes novel techniques and processes to fabricate the next generation of devices that further widens the use of DEP. These innovations include new materials and geometries, volumetric 3D structures, cost-reducing approaches, large-scale manufacturing, and disposable devices. Submissions that assess the effect of process parameters on the performance of DEP devices are particularly encouraged. Submissions integrating modeling and experimentation are preferred.

Dr. Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microfabrication
  • nanofabrication
  • materials
  • 3D printing
  • manufacturing
  • electrokinetics
  • performance

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Polarizability-Dependent Sorting of Microparticles Using Continuous-Flow Dielectrophoretic Chromatography with a Frequency Modulation Method
Micromachines 2020, 11(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11010038 - 28 Dec 2019
Abstract
The separation of microparticles with respect to different properties such as size and material is a research field of great interest. Dielectrophoresis, a phenomenon that is capable of addressing multiple particle properties at once, can be used to perform a chromatographic separation. However, [...] Read more.
The separation of microparticles with respect to different properties such as size and material is a research field of great interest. Dielectrophoresis, a phenomenon that is capable of addressing multiple particle properties at once, can be used to perform a chromatographic separation. However, the selectivity of current dielectrophoretic particle chromatography (DPC) techniques is limited. Here, we show a new approach for DPC based on differences in the dielectrophoretic mobilities and the crossover frequencies of polystyrene particles. Both differences are addressed by modulating the frequency of the electric field to generate positive and negative dielectrophoretic movement to achieve multiple trap-and-release cycles of the particles. A chromatographic separation of different particle sizes revealed the voltage dependency of this method. Additionally, we showed the frequency bandwidth influence on separation using one example. The DPC method developed was tested with model particles, but offers possibilities to separate a broad range of plastic and metal microparticles or cells and to overcome currently existing limitations in selectivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micromachines for Dielectrophoresis)
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