Special Issue "Microengineering Techniques for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mohsen Akbari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory for Innovations in Microengineering (LiME), Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
Interests: applications of micro- and nanotechnologies for biomedical engineering (bio-mems) and energy; tissue engineering; organs-on-chip; microfluidics; sustainable energy
Dr. Carlos Escobedo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada
Interests: miniaturized technologies for analytical and diagnostic applications; microfluidics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microengineering approaches are enabling technologies for creating biomimetic cell culture systems that recapitulate the cell-cell and cell-tissue interactions, as well as, spatiotemporal chemical gradients, and dynamic mechanical microenvironments in living organs. These bioengineered systems offer unique opportunities for disease modeling and drug discovery due to their ability to promote cellular and tissue organizations which were not possible in conventional monolayer culture systems. The current Special Issue aims to address recent advances in the fabrication and operation of microengineered tissue culture platforms with particular emphasis on microfabricated tissues, single- or multi-organ-on-chip devices, 3D bioprinted tissue models, and multicellular spheroids. The interface of these systems with genomics, metabolomics, and proteomics for the better understanding of disease formation and progression is also of great interest. Moreover, we encourage manuscripts on the development of sensors for long-term monitoring of cellular microenvironments and studies reporting high-throughput designs for investigating the toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

Dr. Mohsen Akbari
Dr. Carlos Escobedo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microfabrication
  • Microengineering
  • Disease Modeling
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Drug discovery
  • Organs-on-chip

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
3D Printing Breast Tissue Models: A Review of Past Work and Directions for Future Work
Micromachines 2019, 10(8), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10080501 - 27 Jul 2019
Abstract
Breast cancer often results in the removal of the breast, creating a need for replacement tissue. Tissue engineering offers the promise of generating such replacements by combining cells with biomaterial scaffolds and serves as an attractive potential alternative to current surgical repair methods. [...] Read more.
Breast cancer often results in the removal of the breast, creating a need for replacement tissue. Tissue engineering offers the promise of generating such replacements by combining cells with biomaterial scaffolds and serves as an attractive potential alternative to current surgical repair methods. Such engineered tissues can also serve as important tools for drug screening and provide in vitro models for analysis. 3D bioprinting serves as an exciting technology with significant implications and applications in the field of tissue engineering. Here we review the work that has been undertaken in hopes of generating the recognized in-demand replacement breast tissue using different types of bioprinting. We then offer suggestions for future work needed to advance this field for both in vitro and in vivo applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microengineering Techniques for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery)
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Open AccessReview
Coupling Microfluidic Platforms, Microfabrication, and Tissue Engineered Scaffolds to Investigate Tumor Cells Mechanobiology
Micromachines 2019, 10(6), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10060418 - 22 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The tumor microenvironment (TME) is composed of dynamic and complex networks composed of matrix substrates, extracellular matrix (ECM), non-malignant cells, and tumor cells. The TME is in constant evolution during the disease progression, most notably through gradual stiffening of the stroma. Within the [...] Read more.
The tumor microenvironment (TME) is composed of dynamic and complex networks composed of matrix substrates, extracellular matrix (ECM), non-malignant cells, and tumor cells. The TME is in constant evolution during the disease progression, most notably through gradual stiffening of the stroma. Within the tumor, increased ECM stiffness drives tumor growth and metastatic events. However, classic in vitro strategies to study the TME in cancer lack the complexity to fully replicate the TME. The quest to understand how the mechanical, geometrical, and biochemical environment of cells impacts their behavior and fate has been a major force driving the recent development of new technologies in cell biology research. Despite rapid advances in this field, many challenges remain in order to bridge the gap between the classical culture dish and the biological reality of actual tissue. Microfabrication coupled with microfluidic approaches aim to engineer the actual complexity of the TME. Moreover, TME bioengineering allows artificial modulations with single or multiple cues to study different phenomena occurring in vivo. Some innovative cutting-edge tools and new microfluidic approaches could have an important impact on the fields of biology and medicine by bringing deeper understanding of the TME, cell behavior, and drug effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microengineering Techniques for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery)
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