Special Issue "Deformable Bioelectronics Based on Functional Micro/nanomaterials"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Donghee Son
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419, Korea
Interests: stretchable electronics; self-healing electronics; peripheral neural interface; functional nanomaterials; bio-integrated electronic system
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Deformable bioelectronics based on functional micro/nanomaterials, the topic of this Special Issue, have attracted huge attention owing to their tremendous potential in wearable and implantable applications. Specifically, high-performance functional micro/nanomaterials are able to allow the deformable electronics to be more feasible in next-generation healthcare and medicine due to their exceptional biocompatibility, flexibility, and even bioresorbability while maintaining high electrical performances. Therefore, the multifunctional deformable electronics integrated with such superior micro/nanomaterials have been expected to be comparable to conventional material-driven devices in the near future. An approach to the realization of the wearable/implantable bioelectronics can be divided into several methods: i) Using intrinsically flexible/stretchable/biocompatible conducting and semiconducting micro/nanocomposites, ii) enabling the rigid inorganic micro/nanomembranes to be deformable using the serpentine interconnect and neutral mechanical plane, iii) integrating commercial electronic chips, non-volatile memory modules, batteries, and wireless/power communication parts into flexible or transient substrates. In this Special Issue, we will cover various methodologies related to flexible/stretchable and bioresorbable micro/nanomaterial-based wearable and implantable bioelectronics. We invite researchers who are working on deformable materials and devices, ranging from biocompatible functional material synthesis and its device fabrication to process and system integration, to submit their high-quality manuscript for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Donghee Son
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Flexible electronics
  • Stretchable electronics
  • Transient electronics
  • Functional nanomaterials
  • MEMS
  • Bio-integrated electronic systems
  • Wireless communication
  • Human–machine interface
  • Bioresorbable materials
  • Biocompatibility
  • Neural interface
  • Brain
  • Spinal cord
  • Optogenetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Skin-Conformal, Stretchable, and Breathable Fiducial Marker Patch for Surgical Navigation Systems
Micromachines 2020, 11(2), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11020194 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Augmented reality (AR) surgical navigation systems have attracted considerable attention as they assist medical professionals in visualizing the location of ailments within the human body that are not readily seen with the naked eye. Taking medical imaging with a parallel C-shaped arm (C-arm) [...] Read more.
Augmented reality (AR) surgical navigation systems have attracted considerable attention as they assist medical professionals in visualizing the location of ailments within the human body that are not readily seen with the naked eye. Taking medical imaging with a parallel C-shaped arm (C-arm) as an example, surgical sites are typically targeted using an optical tracking device and a fiducial marker in real-time. These markers then guide operators who are using a multifunctional endoscope apparatus by signaling the direction or distance needed to reach the affected parts of the body. In this way, fiducial markers are used to accurately protect the vessels and nerves exposed during the surgical process. Although these systems have already shown potential for precision implantation, delamination of the fiducial marker, which is a critical component of the system, from human skin remains a challenge due to a mechanical mismatch between the marker and skin, causing registration problems that lead to poor position alignments and surgical degradation. To overcome this challenge, the mechanical modulus and stiffness of the marker patch should be lowered to approximately 150 kPa, which is comparable to that of the epidermis, while improving functionality. Herein, we present a skin-conformal, stretchable yet breathable fiducial marker for the application in AR-based surgical navigation systems. By adopting pore patterns, we were able to create a fiducial marker with a skin-like low modulus and breathability. When attached to the skin, the fiducial marker was easily identified using optical recognition equipment and showed skin-conformal adhesion when stretched and shrunk repeatedly. As such, we believe the marker would be a good fiducial marker candidate for patients under surgical navigation systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deformable Bioelectronics Based on Functional Micro/nanomaterials)
Open AccessArticle
Wire Electrodes Embedded in Artificial Conduit for Long-term Monitoring of the Peripheral Nerve Signal
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030184 - 13 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Massive efforts to develop neural interfaces have been made for controlling prosthetic limbs according to the will of the patient, with the ultimate goal being long-term implantation. One of the major struggles is that the electrode’s performance degrades over time due to scar [...] Read more.
Massive efforts to develop neural interfaces have been made for controlling prosthetic limbs according to the will of the patient, with the ultimate goal being long-term implantation. One of the major struggles is that the electrode’s performance degrades over time due to scar formation. Herein, we have developed peripheral nerve electrodes with a cone-shaped flexible artificial conduit capable of protecting wire electrodes from scar formation. The wire electrodes, which are composed of biocompatible alloy materials, were embedded in the conduit where the inside was filled with collagen to allow the damaged nerves to regenerate into the conduit and interface with the wire electrodes. After implanting the wire electrodes into the sciatic nerve of a rat, we successfully recorded the peripheral neural signals while providing mechanical stimulation. Remarkably, we observed the external stimuli-induced nerve signals at 19 weeks after implantation. This is possibly due to axon regeneration inside our platform. To verify the tissue response of our electrodes to the sciatic nerve, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) and observed axon regeneration without scar tissue forming inside the conduit. Thus, our strategy has proven that our neural interface can play a significant role in the long-term monitoring of the peripheral nerve signal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deformable Bioelectronics Based on Functional Micro/nanomaterials)
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