Hybrid Metal Additive Manufacturing

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Additive Manufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 May 2024) | Viewed by 3051

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: hybrid manufacturing; metal forming; joining processes; additive manufacturing; experimentation; numerical simulation

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Guest Editor
1. CIMOSM, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa, R. Conselheiro Emídio Navarro 1, 1959-007 Lisboa, Portugal
2. IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: hybrid manufacturing; metal forming; joining by forming, additive manufacturing, non-conventional machining; experimentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: metal forming; welding; joining by forming; additive; manufacturing; hybrid additive manufacturing; finite element modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hybrid manufacturing (HM) involves combinations of different technologies to overcome their individual limitations and benefit from their synergistic advantages. In the case of hybrid additive manufacturing (HAM), the aim is to overcome the inherent drawbacks of additive manufacturing (AM) related to low productivity, metallurgical defects, rough surface quality, and the lack of dimensional accuracy through integration with conventional manufacturing technologies. HAM can also be seen as a strategy for fostering flexibility and reducing material waste.

Under these circumstances, the aim and objectives of this Special Issue are focused on recent advances in hybrid metal additive manufacturing (HMAM), covering new processing routes, materials, equipment, and applications. Experimental and numerical investigations covering fundamental topics of HMAM are also welcome.

Dr. Carlos Alves da Silva
Dr. Ivo Manuel Ferreira de Bragança
Dr. João Pedro da Fonseca Matos Pragana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hybrid metal additive manufacturing
  • processes
  • materials
  • equipment
  • applications
  • experimentation
  • numerical simulation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6446 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Lattice Structures for Medical Implants: A Study on the Mechanical Properties of Various Unit Cell Types
by Pedro Nogueira, Pedro Lopes, Luís Oliveira, Jorge L. Alves, João P. G. Magrinho, Augusto Moita de Deus, M. Fátima Vaz and M. Beatriz Silva
Metals 2024, 14(7), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/met14070780 - 2 Jul 2024
Viewed by 626
Abstract
Lattice structures are a prime candidate for applications in the medical implant industry due to their versatile mechanical behaviour, which can be tailored to meet specific patient needs and reduce stress shielding, while enabling the natural flow of body fluids. In this work, [...] Read more.
Lattice structures are a prime candidate for applications in the medical implant industry due to their versatile mechanical behaviour, which can be tailored to meet specific patient needs and reduce stress shielding, while enabling the natural flow of body fluids. In this work, the mechanical properties of metallic lattices made of five different unit cell types, Cubic (C), Truncated Octahedron (TO), Truncated Cubic (TC), Rhombicuboctahedron (RCO), and Rhombitruncated Cuboctahedron (RTCO), were evaluated under uniaxial compression at three different relative densities, 5%, 15%, and 45%. The evaluation was experimental, and it was compared with previous and new finite element simulations. Specimens for the experimental tests were fabricated in stainless steel 316L by laser powder bed fusion, and stress–strain curves were obtained for the different lattices. The combination of the test results with a critical interpretation of the deformation mechanisms allowed us to confirm that two unit cell types, TO and RTCO, are stable for the whole range of relative densities evaluated. The other three unit cells exhibit more unpredictable behaviour, either due to manufacturing defects or limitations, or because their unstable compression behaviour leads to bucking. For these reasons, TO and RTCO unit cell types are mechanically more adequate for applications in the medical implant industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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13 pages, 8954 KiB  
Article
On the Enhancement of Material Formability in Hybrid Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing
by João P. M. Pragana, Beatriz Brito, Ivo M. F. Bragança, Carlos M. A. Silva and Paulo A. F. Martins
Metals 2024, 14(6), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/met14060716 - 17 Jun 2024
Viewed by 545
Abstract
This paper is focused on improving material formability in hybrid wire-arc additive manufacturing comprising metal forming stages to produce small-to-medium batches of customized parts. The methodology involves fabricating wire arc additive manufactured AISI 316L stainless steel parts subjected to mechanical and thermal processing [...] Read more.
This paper is focused on improving material formability in hybrid wire-arc additive manufacturing comprising metal forming stages to produce small-to-medium batches of customized parts. The methodology involves fabricating wire arc additive manufactured AISI 316L stainless steel parts subjected to mechanical and thermal processing (MTP), followed by microhardness measurements, tensile testing with digital image correlation, as well as microstructure and microscopic observations. Results show that mechanical processing by pre-straining followed by thermal processing by annealing can reduce material hardness and strength, increase ductility, and eliminate anisotropy by recrystallizing the as-built dendritic-based columnar grain microstructure into an equiaxed grain microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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18 pages, 9553 KiB  
Article
Maximising the Deposition Rate of 5356 Aluminium Alloy by CMT-Twin-Based WAAM While Reducing Segregation-Related Problems by Local IR Thermography
by Lexuri Vazquez, Amaia Iturrioz, Pablo Lopez de Uralde and Pedro Alvarez
Metals 2023, 13(11), 1890; https://doi.org/10.3390/met13111890 - 14 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1284
Abstract
The CMT-Twin-based wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process for 5356 aluminium alloy has been investigated focusing on the optimisation of welding parameters to maximise the deposition rate while avoiding segregation-related problems during solidification. For that, different conditions have been studied regarding interpass [...] Read more.
The CMT-Twin-based wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process for 5356 aluminium alloy has been investigated focusing on the optimisation of welding parameters to maximise the deposition rate while avoiding segregation-related problems during solidification. For that, different conditions have been studied regarding interpass dwell time and the use of forced cooling. The larger heat input produced by the double-wire CMT-Twin process, compared to the single-wire CMT, creates vast segregations for less intensive cooling conditions and short dwell times that can induce cracks and reduce ductility. Thermography has been applied to set a maximum local temperature between consecutive layers avoiding those segregations and pores, and to optimise the total manufacturing time by varying the interpass dwell time along the height of the wall. Only a constant interpass long dwell time of 240 s and the new optimised strategy were effective in avoiding merged segregations, reducing the latest total manufacturing time by 36%. Obtained tensile properties are comparable to other works using WAAM for this alloy, showing lower properties in the vertical orientation. The use of CMT-Twin-based welding technology together with variable interpass dwell time controlled by thermography is an interesting alternative to build up parts with wall thicknesses around of 10 mm in a reduced time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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