Membranes for Food Preservation and Processing

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Applications for Other Areas".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 5995

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics, Physics and Information Technologies, University of Food Technologies, 4002 Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Interests: machine learning; deep learning; data science; big data; iot; statistics; control systems; predictive controllers

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Guest Editor
Department of Process Engineering, University of Food Technologies, 26 Maritza Blvd., 4002 Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Interests: ultrafiltration application; food; biotechnology; membrane processes; food science; food technology

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Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, 87036 Rende, Italy
Interests: membranes and integrated membrane operations in agro-food production; pressure-driven membrane operations; membrane distillation and osmotic distillation; membrane fouling; food processing; food science and technology; bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; proteins; peptides; agri-food by-products valorization; circular economy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Membrane processes are well-known and widely used in various fields such as biomedicine, pharmacy, air, soil and water protection, breeding, agriculture, energetics, etc. This special issue is focused on their application in the food industry. 

Along with the conventional application of membranes in the production of dairy products, fruit juices, wine, and beer, etc., there are also some studies in the scientific literature on new membranes and/or their non-traditional applications such as membrane emulsification, electrodialysis of organic acids from the fermentation broth, as well as their use for the production of innovative foods.

Therefore, this Special issue will search original scientific developments in the following areas: (i) new materials for membrane production, (ii) novel or existing membranes with a new application in food preservation and processing, and (iii) the production of innovative and functional foods obtained as a result of membrane processes. These topics are indicative and research is not strictly limited to them.

We invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Review articles, short communications, and full-size research papers are all welcome.

Dr. Margarita Terzyiska
Dr. Mariya Dushkova
Dr. Alfredo Cassano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • membranes for food preservation
  • membranes for food processing
  • membrane processes for food preservation
  • membrane processes for food applications
  • applications of membranes and membrane processes for innovative and functional foods
  • any other investigations related to membranes for food applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 17272 KiB  
Article
Green and Sustainable Forward Osmosis Process for the Concentration of Apple Juice Using Sodium Lactate as Draw Solution
by Yuhang Zhao, Chang Liu, Jianju Deng, Panpan Zhang, Shiyuan Feng and Yu Chen
Membranes 2024, 14(5), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes14050106 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 769
Abstract
China is the world’s largest producer and exporter of concentrated apple juice (CAJ). However, traditional concentration methods such as vacuum evaporation (VE) and freeze concentration cause the loss of essential nutrients and heat-sensitive components with high energy consumption. A green and effective technique [...] Read more.
China is the world’s largest producer and exporter of concentrated apple juice (CAJ). However, traditional concentration methods such as vacuum evaporation (VE) and freeze concentration cause the loss of essential nutrients and heat-sensitive components with high energy consumption. A green and effective technique is thus desired for juice concentration to improve product quality and sustainability. In this study, a hybrid forward osmosis–membrane distillation (FO–MD) process was explored for the concentration of apple juice using sodium lactate (L-NaLa) as a renewable draw solute. As a result, commercial apple juice could be concentrated up to 65 °Brix by the FO process with an average flux of 2.5 L·m−2·h−1. Most of the nutritional and volatile compounds were well retained in this process, while a significant deterioration in product quality was observed in products obtained by VE concentration. It was also found that membrane fouling in the FO concentration process was reversible, and a periodical UP water flush could remove most of the contaminants on the membrane surface to achieve a flux restoration of more than 95%. In addition, the L-NaLa draw solution could be regenerated by a vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) process with an average flux of around 7.87 L∙m−2∙h−1 for multiple reuse, which further enhanced the long-term sustainability of the hybrid process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Food Preservation and Processing)
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12 pages, 1947 KiB  
Communication
Application of Ultrafiltration for Recovery of Polyphenols from Rose Petal Byproduct
by Mariya Dushkova, Alexios Vardakas, Vasil Shikov, Kiril Mihalev and Margarita Terzyiska
Membranes 2023, 13(10), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes13100818 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1563
Abstract
One main objective of this study was to increase the utilization of raw material in the rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) essential oil industry by the application of membrane technologies. In this research, distilled (dearomatized) rose petals, the primary byproduct in essential oil [...] Read more.
One main objective of this study was to increase the utilization of raw material in the rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) essential oil industry by the application of membrane technologies. In this research, distilled (dearomatized) rose petals, the primary byproduct in essential oil production, were subjected to an enzyme-assisted extraction and subsequent membrane separation for partial concentration at different levels using UF1-PAN and UF10-PAN membranes. The results show that the permeate flux decreased with a rise in volume reduction ratio and increased with a rise in transmembrane pressure and feed flow rate. At the beginning of the process, the highest flux was with the UF1-PAN membrane, but at the end of the process, it was with the UF10-PAN membrane. Total polyphenols of the retentates increased by 27–39% and 26–67% during ultrafiltration with the UF1-PAN and UF10-PAN membranes, respectively, with the highest value obtained for the UF10-PAN membrane at VRR 6. The highest concentration factor and rejection of total solids, total polyphenols, redox-active antioxidants, and radical scavenging antioxidants were obtained at VRR 6 with the UF10-PAN membrane. The use of green technology based on enzyme-assisted extraction and ultrafiltration for recovery and concentration of polyphenols from rose petal byproduct solves practical environmental problems for the treatment and utilization of byproducts from the rose oil industry. The retentate obtained could be used in the food production, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Food Preservation and Processing)
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21 pages, 2234 KiB  
Article
Valorization of Sour Buttermilk (A Potential Waste Stream): Conversion to Powder Employing Reverse Osmosis and Spray Drying
by Subhadip Manik, Ganga Sahay Meena, Ashish Kumar Singh, Yogesh Khetra, Richa Singh, Sumit Arora and Raghu H. Vishweswaraiah
Membranes 2023, 13(9), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes13090799 - 17 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1675
Abstract
Reverse osmosis (RO) is known for the economic dewatering of dairy streams without any change in phase. At the household level, surplus milk is fermented and churned to obtain butter, which is subsequently heated to obtain clarified milk fat (ghee). The [...] Read more.
Reverse osmosis (RO) is known for the economic dewatering of dairy streams without any change in phase. At the household level, surplus milk is fermented and churned to obtain butter, which is subsequently heated to obtain clarified milk fat (ghee). The production of 1 kg ghee generates 15–20 kg sour buttermilk (SBM) as a by-product that is mostly drained. This causes a loss of milk solids and environmental pollution. The processing, preservation and valorization of SBM are quite challenging because of its low total solids (TS) and pH, poor heat stability and limited shelf life. This investigation aimed to transform SBM into a novel dried dairy ingredient. SBM was thermized, filtered, defatted and concentrated at 35 ± 1 °C, employing RO up to 3.62× (12.86%). The RO concentrate was subsequently converted into sour buttermilk powder (SBMP) by employing spray drying. SBMP was further characterized for its physicochemical, reconstitution and functional properties; rheological and morphological characteristics; and amino acid and fatty acid profiling, along with FTIR and XRD spectra. SBMP was “instant soluble-3 s” and exhibited excellent emulsion stability (80.70%), water binding capacity (4.34 g/g of protein), flowability (28.36°) and antioxidant properties. In nutshell, a process was developed for the valorization of sour buttermilk to a novel dairy ingredient by employing reverse osmosis and a spray-drying process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Food Preservation and Processing)
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18 pages, 1991 KiB  
Article
Effect of Birch Sap as Solvent and Source of Bioactive Compounds in Casein and Gelatine Films
by María Carpintero, Ismael Marcet, María Zornoza, Manuel Rendueles and Mario Díaz
Membranes 2023, 13(9), 786; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes13090786 - 11 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1305
Abstract
Birch sap consists of a natural water-based solution with valuable compounds such as minerals, sugars, organic acids and phenolic compounds that can be used advantageously in the preparation of edible films. In this study, gelatine- and casein-based films were prepared using birch sap [...] Read more.
Birch sap consists of a natural water-based solution with valuable compounds such as minerals, sugars, organic acids and phenolic compounds that can be used advantageously in the preparation of edible films. In this study, gelatine- and casein-based films were prepared using birch sap as biopolymer solvent and source of bioactive compounds with the aim of developing new bioactive materials for food packaging. The physical, mechanical, barrier, antioxidant and iron-chelating properties of the obtained films were investigated. Birch sap enhanced the mechanical properties of the films by increasing puncture strength and flexibility, as well as their ultraviolet–visible light barrier properties. In addition, the presence of bioactive compounds endowed the birch sap films with an antioxidant capacity of almost 90% and an iron-chelating capacity of 40–50% with respect to the control films. Finally, to test these films as food packaging material, a photosensitive curcumin solution was packed and exposed to ultraviolet light. Tested films were able to protect curcumin against photodegradation, and the presence of bioactive compounds inside the birch-sap-enriched materials offered an additional 10% photoprotective effect compared to control films. Results showed the potential of birch sap as an environmentally friendly biopolymer solvent and plasticizer that can improve the mechanical and photoprotective properties of the prepared materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Food Preservation and Processing)
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