Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference"

A special issue of Medical Sciences (ISSN 2076-3271). This special issue belongs to the section "Pneumology and Respiratory Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Eva Polverino

Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron (HUVH), Institut de Recerca Vall d'Hebron (VHIR)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: respiratory medicine; epidemiology; risk factors; outcome; treatment; prevention and pathogenetic mechanisms of respiratory infections; community-acquired pneumonia; intensive care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has been a surge in interest in bronchiectasis in recent years, and investigators around the world are now starting to join forces to make substantial progress in the understanding and treatment of this disease.

On these grounds, the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference, held in Hannover on 7–9 July, 2016, was the first conference focusing solely in bronchiectasis and has provided an internationally leading platform for interactions between experts in this field.

The 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference covered a wide range of topics, including microbiome associated with bronchiectasis, clinical trials of new therapies for bronchiectasis, airway inflammation and anti-inflammatory approaches, the association between bronchiectasis and COPD, nontuberculous mycobacteria in bronchiectasis, and the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

With the aim of putting together a collection of the works presented at the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference, you are invited to submit articles, reviews or communications presented at this conference.
All submissions for this Special Issue will have the Article Processing Charges waived.

Dr. Eva Polverino, EMBARC Chair.
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medical Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Healthcare Cost and Utilization before and after Diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among Patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis in the U.S.
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(4), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5040020
Received: 15 August 2017 / Revised: 15 September 2017 / Accepted: 19 September 2017 / Published: 23 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (514 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE) is a rare, chronic lung disease characterized by bronchial inflammation and permanent airway dilation. Chronic infections with P. aeruginosa have been linked to higher morbidity and mortality. To understand the impact of P. aeruginosa in NCFBE on health care [...] Read more.
Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE) is a rare, chronic lung disease characterized by bronchial inflammation and permanent airway dilation. Chronic infections with P. aeruginosa have been linked to higher morbidity and mortality. To understand the impact of P. aeruginosa in NCFBE on health care costs and burden, we assessed healthcare costs and utilization before and after P. aeruginosa diagnosis. Using data from 2007 to 2013 PharMetrics Plus administrative claims, we included patients with ≥2 claims for bronchiectasis and >1 claim for P. aeruginosa; then excluded those with a claim for cystic fibrosis. Patients were indexed at first claim for P. aeruginosa and were required to have >12 months before and after the index P. aeruginosa. The mean differences in utilization and costs were assessed using paired Student’s t-tests for statistical significance. Mean total healthcare costs per patient were $36,213 pre-P. aeruginosa diagnosis versus $67,764 post-P. aeruginosa, an increase of 87% (p < 0.0001). Inpatient costs represented the largest proportion of total healthcare costs post-P. aeruginosa (54%) with an increase of four hospitalizations per patient (p < 0.0001). NCFBE patients with evidence of P. aeruginosa incur substantially greater healthcare costs and utilization after P. aeruginosa diagnosis. Future research should explore methods of earlier identification of NCFBE patients with P. aeruginosa, as this may lead to fewer severe exacerbations, thereby resulting in a reduction in hospitalizations and healthcare costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
The Bronchiectasis Toolbox—A Comprehensive Website for the Management of People with Bronchiectasis
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5020013
Received: 12 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 7 June 2017 / Published: 12 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While the health burden of bronchiectasis is increasing worldwide, medical and physiotherapy treatment strategies have progressed significantly over the past decade. For this reason, clinicians require readily accessible current evidence based information on the management of this condition. E-learning is a suitable educational [...] Read more.
While the health burden of bronchiectasis is increasing worldwide, medical and physiotherapy treatment strategies have progressed significantly over the past decade. For this reason, clinicians require readily accessible current evidence based information on the management of this condition. E-learning is a suitable educational forum for the development and maintenance of professional skills, however a comprehensive, evidence based, multidisciplinary website for bronchiectasis was not available. The Bronchiectasis Toolbox at www.bronchiectasis.com.au was developed by a team of clinicians in Australia and New Zealand with extensive experience in bronchiectasis. The content of this website, based on national and international guidelines, is presented under the headings: ‘Bronchiectasis’, ‘Assessment’, ‘Physiotherapy’, ‘Indigenous’, ‘Paediatrics’, and ‘Resources’. Through a blend of multimedia resources, this website provides information to consolidate the knowledge and practical skills for health professionals caring for people with this condition. After launching in 2015 the website has received 64,549 hits from over 100 countries and the videos have been viewed 10,205 times in 89 countries. The Bronchiectasis Toolbox is a comprehensive multidisciplinary resource accessible to health professionals worldwide who manage people with bronchiectasis and is a unique solution to an educational need. Regular updates will ensure that the website continues to be relevant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Exacerbations in COPD Patients with Bronchiectasis
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(2), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5020007
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 April 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (726 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is evidence that coexisting bronchiectasis (BE) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) aggravates the course of the disease. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency and severity of bacterial exacerbations in COPD patients with BE. The frequency and [...] Read more.
There is evidence that coexisting bronchiectasis (BE) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) aggravates the course of the disease. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency and severity of bacterial exacerbations in COPD patients with BE. The frequency and duration of bacterial exacerbations treated in a 12‐month period, as well as the duration of the exacerbation‐free interval, were evaluated in 54 patients with COPD (Group D) who were diagnosed and assessed according to official recommendations. In 27 patients, BE was diagnosed by high‐resolution computed tomography (HRCT), whereas an equal number of COPD patients who were confirmed negative for BE by HRCT, served as controls. We found a significantly higher mean number of exacerbations in a 12‐month period in COPD patients with BE (2.9 ± 0.5), as compared to their mean number in controls (2.5 ± 0.3) (p = 0.0008). The mean duration of exacerbation, i.e. the mean number of days elapsed before complete resolution of the symptoms or their return to the baseline severity, was significantly longer in COPD patients with BE as compared to their mean duration in controls (6.9 ± 1.8 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4; p = 0.0085). In addition, the mean exacerbation‐free interval expressed in days, in patients with COPD with BE, was significantly shorter than in COPD patients in whom BE were excluded (56.4 ± 17.1 vs. 67.2 ± 14.3; p = 0.0149). Overall, our findings indicate that coexisting BE in COPD patients may lead to more frequent exacerbations with a longer duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 1st World Bronchiectasis Conference)
Figures

Figure 1

Med. Sci. EISSN 2076-3271 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top