Novelties in Chronic Liver Diseases

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Gastroenterology & Hepatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1114

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic liver disease is a silent epidemic worldwide. Published data from the World Health Organization and the Global Burden of Disease show that the burden of chronic liver disease is significant and increasing, primarily due to the increasing burden of metabolic liver disease and alcohol-related liver disease. Additionally, these diseases are associated with a substantial impact on the quality of life and economic burden. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect and present the latest advances in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapies of chronic liver diseases. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, diagnostic, predictive and therapeutic studies. We are interested in exploring the impact of hepatology research in a clinical setting, with regards to pre-clinical data record, clinical data management, accuracy of diagnosis and new treatment options.

The Special Issue should present cutting-edge research demonstrating the effectiveness of research progress in the domain of chronic liver diseases.

We solicit original contributions, reviews and meta-analyses that include, but are not limited to:

  1. Preclinical and clinical studies on the new diagnostic tools and therapies related to chronic liver diseases;
  2. Systematic reviews that explore the current landscape on chronic liver diseases in clinical practice;
  3. Meta-analysis to summarize the trends and the evidence of international literature;
  4. Case studies that highlight significant successes or challenges encountered in the application of new treatment of chronic liver disease in real-life;
  5. Contributions exploring the current approach and novelties in the pre-clinical and clinical setting of chronic liver diseases;
  6. Articles discussing future perspectives and new challenges in the area of chronic liver diseases.

Prof. Dr. Ludovico Abenavoli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metabolism
  • virus
  • alcohol
  • hepatitis
  • epidemiology
  • diagnosis
  • therapies
  • surgery
  • liver transplantation
  • artificial intelligence
  • cirrhosis
  • steatohepatitis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 331 KiB  
Article
Differential Protective Effect of Zinc and Magnesium for the Hepatic and Renal Toxicity Induced by Acetaminophen and Potentiated with Ciprofloxacin in Rats
by Alexandra Ciocan (Moraru), Diana Ciubotariu, Cristina Mihaela Ghiciuc, Mihnea Eudoxiu Hurmuzache, Cătălina Elena Lupușoru and Radu Crișan-Dabija
Medicina 2024, 60(4), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60040611 - 08 Apr 2024
Viewed by 438
Abstract
Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence induced by magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and zinc gluconate (ZnG) supplementation on liver and kidney injuries experimentally induced with acetaminophen (AAPh) and potentiated by a ciprofloxacin addition in [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence induced by magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and zinc gluconate (ZnG) supplementation on liver and kidney injuries experimentally induced with acetaminophen (AAPh) and potentiated by a ciprofloxacin addition in rats. Material and Methods: The experiment was performed on five animal groups: group 1—control, treated for 6 weeks with normal saline, 1 mL/kg; group 2—AAPh, treated for 6 weeks with AAPh, 100 mg/kg/day; group 3—AAPh + C, treated for 6 weeks with AAPh 100 mg/kg/day and ciprofloxacin 50 mg/kg/day, only in the last 14 days of the experiment; group 4—AAPh + C + Mg, with the same treatment as group 3, but in the last 14 days, MgCl2 10 mg/ kg/day was added; and group 5—AAPh + C + Zn, with the same treatment as group 3, but in the last 14 days, zinc gluconate (ZnG), 10 mg/kg/day was added. All administrations were performed by oral gavage. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed and blood samples were collected for biochemistry examinations. Results: Treatment with AAPh for 6 weeks determined an alteration of the liver function (increases in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactic dehydrogenase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase) and of renal function (increases in serum urea and creatinine) (p < 0.001 group 2 vs. group 1 for all mentioned parameters). Furthermore, the antioxidant defense capacity was impaired in group 2 vs. group 1 (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity decreased in group 2 vs. group 1, at 0.001 < p < 0.01 and 0.01 < p < 0.05, respectively). The addition of ciprofloxacin, 50 mg/kg/day during the last 14 days, resulted in further increases in alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine (0.01 < p < 0.05, group 3 vs. group 2). MgCl2 provided a slight protection against the increase in liver enzymes, and a more pronounced protection against the increase in serum urea and creatinine (0.001 < p < 0.01 group 4 vs. group 3). MgCl2 provided a slight protection against the decrease in superoxide dismutase (0.01 < p < 0.05 group 4 vs. group 3), but not against decrease of glutathione peroxidase. The improvement of mentioned parameters could also be seen in the case of ZnG, to a higher extent, especially in the case of alanine aminotransferase and lactic dehydrogenase (0.01 < p < 0.05 group 5 vs. group 4). Conclusions: This study presents further proof for the beneficial effect of magnesium and zinc salts against toxicity induced by different agents, including antibacterials added to the analgesic and antipyretic acetaminophen; the protection is proven on the liver and kidney’s function, and the antioxidant profile improvement has a key role, especially in the case of zinc gluconate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novelties in Chronic Liver Diseases)

Review

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11 pages, 865 KiB  
Review
The Many Faces of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Fatty Liver Disease Treatment: From the Mediterranean Diet to Fecal Microbiota Transplantation
by Ludovico Abenavoli, Maria Luisa Gambardella, Giuseppe Guido Maria Scarlata, Ilaria Lenci, Leonardo Baiocchi and Francesco Luzza
Medicina 2024, 60(4), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60040563 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 482
Abstract
The gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by the gut microbiota. The main phyla are Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, now renamed metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), an alteration in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes abundance promotes its pathogenesis and evolution into non-alcoholic [...] Read more.
The gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by the gut microbiota. The main phyla are Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, now renamed metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), an alteration in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes abundance promotes its pathogenesis and evolution into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. For this reason, early treatment is necessary to counteract its progression. The aim of the present narrative review is to evaluate the different therapeutic approaches to MAFLD. The most important treatment for MAFLD is lifestyle changes. In this regard, the Mediterranean diet could be considered the gold standard in the prevention and treatment of MAFLD. In contrast, a Western diet should be discouraged. Probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation seem to be valid, safe, and effective alternatives for MAFLD treatment. However, more studies with a longer follow-up and with a larger cohort of patients are needed to underline the more effective approaches to contrasting MAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novelties in Chronic Liver Diseases)
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