Special Issue "New Perspectives in the Treatment of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paola Savoia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Science, University of Eastern Peidmont, Novara, Italy
Interests: melanoma; non-melanoma skin cancer; cancerization field; chemoprevention
Dr. Elisa Zavattaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AOU Maggiore della Carità di Novara, Italy
Interests: melanoma; non-melanoma skin cancer; actinic keratoses; transplanted patients

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common malignancy in humans, with a higher incidence in chronically immunosuppressed patients. BCCs can cause significant local tissue destruction and disfigurement, whereas in SCCs, there is a not-insignificant risk of recurrence and metastasis. The goal of the treatment is the complete eradication of the tumor while preserving important functionally and aesthetically anatomical structures. Surgical approaches demonstrate a cure rate greater than 90% when appropriate treatment is applied based on the characteristics of the primary tumor and patient. However, many other treatment modalities have been suggested. In selected cases, medical topical treatments can provide a high chance of cure, with generally excellent cosmetic outcomes.

Moreover, in advanced and metastatic NMSCs, recently developed molecularly targeted therapy and immunological checkpoint inhibitory can represent a reasonably promising alternative.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to discuss all therapeutic approaches of NMSCs, giving information about their mechanisms of action, indications, efficacy, side effects, and contraindications.

Prof. Paola Savoia
Dr. Elisa Zavattaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Non-melanoma skin cancer
  • Skin tumor treatment
  • Basal cell carcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Systemic therapy in NMSC
  • Topical treatment of NMSC
  • Non-surgical treatment of cutaneous tumors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Non-Invasive Analysis of Actinic Keratosis before and after Topical Treatment Using a Cold Stimulation and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Medicina 2020, 56(9), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56090482 - 21 Sep 2020
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Background and objectives: The possible evolution of actinic keratoses (AKs) into invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) makes their treatment and monitoring essential. AKs are typically monitored before and after treatment only through a visual analysis, lacking a quantitative measure to determine treatment [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: The possible evolution of actinic keratoses (AKs) into invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) makes their treatment and monitoring essential. AKs are typically monitored before and after treatment only through a visual analysis, lacking a quantitative measure to determine treatment effectiveness. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive measure of the relative change of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin (O2Hb and HHb) in tissues. The aim of our study is to determine if a time and frequency analysis of the NIRS signals acquired from the skin lesion before and after a topical treatment can highlight quantitative differences between the AK skin lesion area. Materials and Methods: The NIRS signals were acquired from the skin lesions of twenty-two patients, with the same acquisition protocol: baseline signals, application of an ice pack near the lesion, removal of ice pack and acquisition of vascular recovery. We calculated 18 features from the NIRS signals, and we applied multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to compare differences between the NIRS signals acquired before and after the therapy. Results: The MANOVA showed that the features computed on the NIRS signals before and after treatment could be considered as two statistically separate groups, after the ice pack removal. Conclusions: Overall, the NIRS technique with the cold stimulation may be useful to support non-invasive and quantitative lesion analysis and regression after a treatment. The results provide a baseline from which to further study skin lesions and the effects of various treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in the Treatment of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle
The Diagnostic–Therapeutic Care Pathway in Psoriasis: Towards ISO 9001:2015 Certification
Medicina 2020, 56(5), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56050253 - 22 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 565
Abstract
Background and objectives: Psoriasis (Pso) is a common skin condition characterized by a strong psychosocial impact, and is nowadays accepted as a systemic immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Diagnostic–Therapeutic Care Pathways (DTCPs) represent a predefined sequence of diagnostic, therapeutic, and assistance activities that integrate the [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Psoriasis (Pso) is a common skin condition characterized by a strong psychosocial impact, and is nowadays accepted as a systemic immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Diagnostic–Therapeutic Care Pathways (DTCPs) represent a predefined sequence of diagnostic, therapeutic, and assistance activities that integrate the participation of several specialists to obtain, for each patient, the correct diagnosis and thus the most appropriate therapy. A DTCP was validated in our dermatology clinic (AOU Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy). The validation process included the detailed elaboration of a protocol of diagnosis, staging of care, therapies, and follow-up of the patient with Pso. The formalization and adaptation of our DTCP resulted in ISO 9001: 2015 certification in May 2019. Materials and methods: This process involved several stages, including analysis of context and the identification of (i) targets, (ii) indicators, and (iii) service providers. The evaluation was based on a cohort of over 200 patients affected by moderate to severe Pso, who were treated and followed-up at our institution from September 2017 to April 2019. Results: The ISO 9001:2015 quality certification process allowed us to identify our weaknesses, i.e., the long waiting times for the first visit and the reduced physician–patient ratio, but also our strengths, such as the commitment to clinical research, effective collaboration with other specialists, the efficient use of technological and human resources, and attention to ensuring patient follow-up. Conclusions: In qualifying for and achieving the ISO Quality Management System (QMS) certification we were heartened to realize that our basic methodology and approach were fit for purpose. The implementation of the ISO QMS helped us to reorganize our priorities by placing the patient at the center of the process and raising awareness that Pso is not just a skin disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in the Treatment of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer)
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Open AccessCase Report
Primary Mucosal Melanoma Presenting with a Unilateral Nasal Obstruction of the Left Inferior Turbinate
Medicina 2021, 57(4), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina57040359 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 260
Abstract
We report the case of a primitive nasal melanoma in an 82-year-old patient, showing how this rare malignancy, with non-specific signs and symptoms, can represent a challenging diagnosis for the physician. A 82-year-old Caucasian patient presented for unilateral nasal obstruction and occasional epistaxis. [...] Read more.
We report the case of a primitive nasal melanoma in an 82-year-old patient, showing how this rare malignancy, with non-specific signs and symptoms, can represent a challenging diagnosis for the physician. A 82-year-old Caucasian patient presented for unilateral nasal obstruction and occasional epistaxis. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the facial massif revealed turbinate hypertrophy and a polypoid phlogistic tissue isointense in T1 with an intermediate signal in T2 and Short-TI Inversion Recovery (STIR)-T2, occupying the middle meatus and the anterior upper and lower left meatus with partial obliteration of the ostium and the infundibulum of the maxillary sinus. The Positron emission tomography (PET) exam was negative for metastases. Conservatory surgery in the left anterior video rhinoscopy was performed, allowing a radical 4-cm tumor excision. Histology reported epithelioid cell melanoma, PanK−, CD45−, and PanMelanoma+. Adjuvant radiotherapy was suggested, even considering a complete resection as the result of surgery. No local or systemic relapse was noticed at the 2-month follow-up visit. Although mucosal melanoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy characterized by a poor prognosis, early diagnosis allows a more conservative approach, with little surgical difficulty and no aesthetic effect. Our case raises awareness of the importance of early intervention even in those cases where the clinic symptoms and diagnostic images show uncertain severity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in the Treatment of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer)
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Open AccessCase Report
Atypical Cardiac Location of Melanoma of Unknown Origin
Medicina 2021, 57(2), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina57020107 - 25 Jan 2021
Viewed by 338
Abstract
The subject was a 66-year-old woman, suffering from the chest pain evoked by physical activity. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed an abnormal structure, 41 × 29 mm. In MSCT, a hypodensic mobile tissue lesion that was infiltrating the whole thickness of left ventricle was [...] Read more.
The subject was a 66-year-old woman, suffering from the chest pain evoked by physical activity. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed an abnormal structure, 41 × 29 mm. In MSCT, a hypodensic mobile tissue lesion that was infiltrating the whole thickness of left ventricle was confirmed. PET excluded the existence of other remote lesions. After surgical tumor removal, histopathological differential diagnosis revealed melanoma, myoepithelial cancer, and MPNST “high–grade” sarcoma. A control TTE detected a tumor that was 14 × 10 mm. After immunohistochemical results, immunotherapy with pembrolizumab was used, which resulted in complete tumor resolution. Presently, surgical resection and neoadjuvant targeted immunochemotherapy remain the treatment of choice for clinical stage III/IV melanoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in the Treatment of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer)
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