Special Issue "Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Luciano De Sio
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medico-surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Corso della Repubblica 79, 04100, Latina, Italy;
CNR-Lab. Licryl, Institute NANOTEC, Arcavacata di Rende, 87036, Italy
Interests: plasmonics; liquid crystals; optics; biomaterials; optical components; nanomedicine
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The extraordinary light-to-heat conversion property of nanomaterials (e.g., magnetic nanoparticles, plasmonic nanoparticles, etc.) can be utilized for realizing a new generation of minimally-invasive therapies for treating cancer and other incurable diseases. Bio-transparent optical radiations (700900 nm) have been combined with engineered and functionalized nanomaterials for developing the so-called photo-thermal therapies. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have reported flourish achievements, although further research is needed. This Special Issue is devoted to overview both fundamental theories and advanced applications of nanomaterials as efficient nano-source of heat remotely controllable by light. We invite investigators to contribute with review and original papers reporting recent efforts in the field of nanomaterials based photo-thermal therapies.

Dr. Luciano De Sio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • optics
  • plasmonics
  • hyperthermia
  • cancer treatment

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Thermo-Plasmonic Killing of Escherichia coli TG1 Bacteria
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1530; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091530 - 10 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT) is a minimally invasive, drug-free, therapy based on the properties of noble metal nanoparticles, able to convert a bio-transparent electromagnetic radiation into heat. PPTT has been used against cancer and other diseases. Herein, we demonstrate an antimicrobial methodology based [...] Read more.
Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT) is a minimally invasive, drug-free, therapy based on the properties of noble metal nanoparticles, able to convert a bio-transparent electromagnetic radiation into heat. PPTT has been used against cancer and other diseases. Herein, we demonstrate an antimicrobial methodology based on the properties of gold nanorods (GNRs). Under a resonant laser irradiation GNRs become highly efficient light to heat nano-converters extremely useful for PPTT applications. The concept here is to assess the antimicrobial effect of easy to synthesize, suitably purified, water-dispersible GNRs on Escherichia coli bacteria. A control on the GNRs concentration used for the process has been demonstrated critical in order to rule out cytotoxic effects on the cells, and still to be able to generate, under a near infrared illumination, an adequate amount of heat suited to increase the temperature up to ≈50 °C in about 5 min. Viability experiments evidenced that the proposed system accomplished a killing efficiency suitable to reducing the Escherichia coli population of about 2 log CFU (colony-forming unit). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Er-Doped Nanostructured BaTiO3 for NIR to Visible Upconversion
Materials 2018, 11(10), 1950; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11101950 - 12 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Photoluminescent mechanisms in erbium-doped barium titanate nanoparticle systems were studied. Er3+ ions were introduced into the BaTiO3 lattice by the sol-gel method. The resulting Er3+ concentration was between 0% and 5%, with Ba/Ti ratios of 1.008 and 0.993. The stoichiometry [...] Read more.
Photoluminescent mechanisms in erbium-doped barium titanate nanoparticle systems were studied. Er3+ ions were introduced into the BaTiO3 lattice by the sol-gel method. The resulting Er3+ concentration was between 0% and 5%, with Ba/Ti ratios of 1.008 and 0.993. The stoichiometry of Ba and Ti concentrations in the lattice influenced the doping mechanism and placement of erbium ions in the lattice structure. Our research shows the existence of a strong correlation between Ba/Ti ratios, erbium concentration, phase structure and doping site location on the upconversion photoluminescence mechanisms. Competing upconversion emissions 2H11/2/4S3/24I15/2 at 523 and 548 nm respectively and other photoluminescent mechanisms as 4I9/24I11/2 around 4000 nm (2500 cm−1) were studied using Raman and emission spectroscopy. The upconversion process is predominant over other photoluminescent decay when the material presents high distortion in the surrounding activator. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
A Semimetal-Like Molybdenum Carbide Quantum Dots Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Agent with High Photothermal Conversion Efficiency
Materials 2018, 11(9), 1776; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091776 - 19 Sep 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
Theranostic platforms integrating imaging diagnostic and therapeutic interventions into a single nanoplatform have attracted considerable attention for cancer-individualized therapies. However, their uncertain stability, complex pharmacokinetics, and intrinsic toxicology of multiple components hinder their practical application in clinical research. In this paper, stable and [...] Read more.
Theranostic platforms integrating imaging diagnostic and therapeutic interventions into a single nanoplatform have attracted considerable attention for cancer-individualized therapies. However, their uncertain stability, complex pharmacokinetics, and intrinsic toxicology of multiple components hinder their practical application in clinical research. In this paper, stable and high-concentration molybdenum carbide quantum dots (Mo2C QDs) with a diameter of approximately 6 nm and a topographic height of about 1.5 nm were synthesized using a facile sonication-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation approach. The prepared Mo2C QDs exhibited a strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance with a high molar extinction coefficient of 4.424 Lg−1cm−1 at 808 nm, a high photothermal conversion efficiency of 42.9%, and showed excellent performance on photoacoustic imaging. The Mo2C QDs had high stability and highly biocompatibility, with low cytotoxicity. Under NIR irradiation, a remarkable in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effect was obtained. Such a stable and biocompatible all-in-one theranostic nanoagent generated by facile synthesis that combines promising imaging guidance and effective tumor ablation properties may hold great potential for theranostic nanomedicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanomaterial Applications in Photothermal Therapy for Cancer
Materials 2019, 12(5), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12050779 - 07 Mar 2019
Cited by 26
Abstract
As a result of their unique compositions and properties, nanomaterials have recently seen a tremendous increase in use for novel cancer therapies. By taking advantage of the optical absorption of near-infrared light, researchers have utilized nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, gold nanorods, and [...] Read more.
As a result of their unique compositions and properties, nanomaterials have recently seen a tremendous increase in use for novel cancer therapies. By taking advantage of the optical absorption of near-infrared light, researchers have utilized nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, gold nanorods, and graphene oxide sheets to enhance photothermal therapies and target the effect on the tumor tissue. However, new uses for nanomaterials in targeted cancer therapy are coming to light, and the efficacy of photothermal therapy has increased dramatically. In this work, we review some of the current applications of nanomaterials to enhance photothermal therapy, specifically as photothermal absorbers, drug delivery vehicles, photoimmunological agents, and theranostic tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances of Plasmonic Nanoparticles and their Applications
Materials 2018, 11(10), 1833; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11101833 - 26 Sep 2018
Cited by 22
Abstract
In the past half-century, surface plasmon resonance in noble metallic nanoparticles has been an important research subject. Recent advances in the synthesis, assembly, characterization, and theories of traditional and non-traditional metal nanostructures open a new pathway to the kaleidoscopic applications of plasmonics. However, [...] Read more.
In the past half-century, surface plasmon resonance in noble metallic nanoparticles has been an important research subject. Recent advances in the synthesis, assembly, characterization, and theories of traditional and non-traditional metal nanostructures open a new pathway to the kaleidoscopic applications of plasmonics. However, accurate and precise models of plasmon resonance are still challenging, as its characteristics can be affected by multiple factors. We herein summarize the recent advances of plasmonic nanoparticles and their applications, particularly regarding the fundamentals and applications of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in Au nanoparticles, plasmon-enhanced upconversion luminescence, and plasmonic chiral metasurfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessReview
Detection of Intracellular Gold Nanoparticles: An Overview
Materials 2018, 11(6), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11060882 - 24 May 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
Photothermal therapy (PTT) takes advantage of unique properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (nanospheres, nanoshells (AuNSs), nanorods (AuNRs)) to destroy cancer cells or tumor tissues. This is made possible thanks principally to both to the so-called near-infrared biological transparency window, characterized by wavelengths falling [...] Read more.
Photothermal therapy (PTT) takes advantage of unique properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (nanospheres, nanoshells (AuNSs), nanorods (AuNRs)) to destroy cancer cells or tumor tissues. This is made possible thanks principally to both to the so-called near-infrared biological transparency window, characterized by wavelengths falling in the range 700–1100 nm, where light has its maximum depth of penetration in tissue, and to the efficiency of cellular uptake mechanisms of AuNPs. Consequently, the possible identification of intracellular AuNPs plays a key role for estimating the effectiveness of PTT treatments. Here, we review the recognized detection techniques of such intracellular probes with a special emphasis to the exploitation of near-infrared biological transparency window. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective
Antimicrobial Effects of Chemically Functionalized and/or Photo-Heated Nanoparticles
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1078; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071078 - 02 Apr 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance refers to when microorganisms survive and grow in the presence of specific antibiotics, a phenomenon mainly related to the indiscriminate widespread use and abuse of antibiotics. In this framework, thanks to the design and fabrication of original functional nanomaterials, nanotechnology offers [...] Read more.
Antibiotic resistance refers to when microorganisms survive and grow in the presence of specific antibiotics, a phenomenon mainly related to the indiscriminate widespread use and abuse of antibiotics. In this framework, thanks to the design and fabrication of original functional nanomaterials, nanotechnology offers a powerful weapon against several diseases such as cancer and pathogenic illness. Smart nanomaterials, such as metallic nanoparticles and semiconductor nanocrystals, enable the realization of novel drug-free medical therapies for fighting against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In the light of the latest developments, we highlight the outstanding capabilities of several nanotechnology-inspired approaches to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Chemically functionalized silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been employed for their intrinsic toxicity, which enables them to exhibit an antimicrobial activity while, in a different approach, photo-thermal properties of metallic nanoparticles have been theoretically studied and experimentally tested against several temperature sensitive (mesophilic) bacteria. We also show that it is possible to combine a highly localized targeting with a plasmonic-based heating therapy by properly functionalizing nanoparticle surfaces with covalently linked antibodies. As a perspective, the utilization of properly engineered and chemically functionalized nanomaterials opens a new roads for realizing antibiotic free treatments against pathogens and related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photothermal Therapy of Nanomaterials)
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