Special Issue "Experimental Characterization and Numerical Modelling of Materials Mechanical Behaviour"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Diego Celentano
Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Metalúrgica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Interests: experimental characterization and numerical modelling of the mechanical behavior of materials; experimental analysis and thermomechanical–microstructural modelling of the industrial processes; numerical simulation oriented to the improvement of processes design; computational biomechanics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio J. Sánchez Egea
Website
Guest Editor
Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile
Interests: Machining, machine tools, modelling, non-conventinal manufacturing processes, material texturing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a pleasure to invite you to take part in the Special Issue of Materials that we coordinate and titled “Experimental Characterization and Numerical Modelling of Materials Mechanical Behavior”. The opportunity to submit your research reports is open until 30 November 2019. Here is described the scope of this Special Issue:

Metal forming comprises industrially relevant manufacturing processes in which the characterization of the mechanical response of the materials involved in different engineering applications is a crucial task. This characterization may contribute to a more efficient use of the available resources by means of the enhancement of both the operating conditions and the process design. Therefore, this analysis encompasses not only experimental aspects but also theoretical modelling and numerical simulation, whose final goal is to achieve a realistic description of many of the usually complex physical phenomena present in these engineering problems.

This Special Issue aims to collect the latest advances in modelling and numerical and experimental validation of the mechanical behavior of materials used in common engineering environments. Contributions are welcome from both academic researchers and their industrial peers, dealing with novel manufacturing applications. Accordingly, this Special Issue covers the following topics:

  • Novel experimental techniques for material characterization
  • Phenomenological and multiscale constitutive modelling
  • Improved algorithms for material parameters identification
  • Coupled thermomechanical and metallurgical modelling
  • Fracture and damage criteria
  • Numerical simulation of forming processes: casting, forging, extrusion, rolling, stamping, deep drawing, thermoforming, wire/tube drawing, additive manufacturing, welding, friction stir welding, etc

Sincerely,

Prof. Diego J. Celentano
Dr. Antonio J. Sánchez Egea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Experimental characterization techniques 
  • Constitutive modelling 
  • Coupled phenomena 
  • Forming processes 
  • Modelling and numerical approaches

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Estimation of Specific Cutting Energy in an S235 Alloy for Multi-Directional Ultrasonic Vibration-Assisted Machining Using the Finite Element Method
Materials 2020, 13(3), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030567 - 24 Jan 2020
Abstract
The objective of this work is to analyze the influence of the vibration-assisted turning process on the machinability of S235 carbon steel. During the experiments using this vibrational machining process, the vibrational amplitude and frequency of the cutting tool were adjusted to drive [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is to analyze the influence of the vibration-assisted turning process on the machinability of S235 carbon steel. During the experiments using this vibrational machining process, the vibrational amplitude and frequency of the cutting tool were adjusted to drive the tool tip in an elliptical or linear motion in the feed direction. Furthermore, a finite element analysis was deployed to investigate the mechanical response for different vibration-assisted cutting conditions. The results show how the specific cutting energy and the material’s machinability behave when using different operational cutting parameters, such as vibration frequency and tool tip motion in the x-axis, y-axis, and elliptical (x-y plane) motion. Then, the specific cutting energy and material’s machinability are compared with a conventional turning process, which helps to validate the finite element method (FEM) for the vibration-assisted process. As a result of the operating parameters used, the vibration-assisted machining process leads to a machinability improvement of up to 18% in S235 carbon steel. In particular, higher vibration frequencies were shown to increase the material’s machinability due to the specific cutting energy decrease. Therefore, the finite element method can be used to predict the vibration-assisted cutting and the specific cutting energy, based on predefined cutting parameters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Mesoscale Simulation to Study Constitutive Properties of TATB/F2314 PBX
Materials 2019, 12(22), 3767; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12223767 - 16 Nov 2019
Abstract
Material Point Method (MPM) mesoscale simulation was used to study the constitutive relation of a polymer bonded explosive (PBX) consisting of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and a fluorine polymer binder F2314. The stress-strain variations of the PBX were calculated for different temperatures and [...] Read more.
Material Point Method (MPM) mesoscale simulation was used to study the constitutive relation of a polymer bonded explosive (PBX) consisting of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and a fluorine polymer binder F2314. The stress-strain variations of the PBX were calculated for different temperatures and different porosities, and the results were found to be consistent with experimental observations. The stress-strain relations at different temperatures were used to develop the constitutive equation of the PBX by using numerical data fitting. Stress-strain data for different porosities were used to establish the constitutive equation by fitting the simulation data to an improved Hashion-Shtrikman model. The equation can be used to predict the shear modulus and bulk modulus of the PBX at different densities of the sample. The constitutive equations developed for TATB/F2314 PBX by MPM mesoscale simulation are important equations for the numerical simulations of the PBX at macroscale. The method presented in this study provides an alternative approach for studying the constitutive relations of PBX. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Deformation Behaviour and Residual Stress in Rotary Swaged Cu/Al Clad Composite Wires
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3462; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213462 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
Both copper and aluminum are widely applicable throughout a variety of industrial and commercial branches, however, joining them in a composite provides the possibility of combining all their advantageous properties in one material. This study investigates uniquely sequenced copper–aluminum clad composite wires, fabricated [...] Read more.
Both copper and aluminum are widely applicable throughout a variety of industrial and commercial branches, however, joining them in a composite provides the possibility of combining all their advantageous properties in one material. This study investigates uniquely sequenced copper–aluminum clad composite wires, fabricated via rotary swaging technology. The composites were processed at 20 °C and 250 °C to a diameter of 5 mm. Structural observations and the determination of residual stress within both elements of the swaged wires were performed via electron microscopy; the experimental results were correlated with numerical predictions. As shown in the results, both the applied swaging force and temperature affected the plastic flow, which had a direct influence on residual stress and texture development; the Alsheath elements exhibited ideal rolling textures, whereas the Cuwires elements featured ideal shear texture orientation. The grains within both the Alsheath elements of the 5 mm composite wire were refined down to sub-micron size. Structural restoration also had a positive influence on residual stress. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Elastoplastic Response in the Torsion Test Applied to a Cylindrical Sample
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193200 - 29 Sep 2019
Abstract
This work presents an experimental and numerical analysis of the mechanical behavior of a fixed-end SAE 1045 steel cylindrical specimen during the torsion test. To this end, an iterative numerical–experimental methodology is firstly proposed to assess the material response in the tensile test [...] Read more.
This work presents an experimental and numerical analysis of the mechanical behavior of a fixed-end SAE 1045 steel cylindrical specimen during the torsion test. To this end, an iterative numerical–experimental methodology is firstly proposed to assess the material response in the tensile test using a large strain elastoplasticity-based model solved in the context of the finite element method. Then, a 3D numerical simulation of the deformation process of the torsion test is tackled with this previously characterized model that proves to be able to predict the development of a high and localized triaxial stress and strain fields caused by the presence of high levels of angular deformation. Finally, the obtained numerical results are analytically studied with the cylindrical components of the Green–Lagrange strain tensor and experimentally validated with the measurements of shear strains via Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and the corresponding torque – twist angle curve. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of the Elastoplastic Response of Low Zn-Cu-Ti Alloy Sheets Using the CPB-06 Criterion
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3072; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193072 - 20 Sep 2019
Abstract
Unlike other HCP metals such as titanium and magnesium, the behavior of zinc alloys has only been modeled in the literature. For the low Zn-Cu-Ti alloy sheet studied in this work, the anisotropy is clearly seen on the stress-strain curves and Lankford coefficients. [...] Read more.
Unlike other HCP metals such as titanium and magnesium, the behavior of zinc alloys has only been modeled in the literature. For the low Zn-Cu-Ti alloy sheet studied in this work, the anisotropy is clearly seen on the stress-strain curves and Lankford coefficients. These features impose a rigorous characterization and an adequate selection of the constitutive model to obtain an accurate representation of the material behavior in metal forming simulations. To describe the elastoplastic behavior of the alloy, this paper focuses on the material characterization through the application of the advanced Cazacu-Plunket-Barlat 2006 (CPB-06 for short) yield function combined with the well-known Hollomon hardening law. To this end, a two-stage methodology is proposed. Firstly, the material characterization is performed via tensile test measurements on sheet samples cut along the rolling, diagonal and transverse directions in order to fit the parameters involved in the associate CPB-06/Hollomon constitutive model. Secondly, these material parameters are assessed and validated in the simulation of the bulge test using different dies. The results obtained with the CPB-06/Hollomon model show a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. Therefore, it is concluded that this model represents a consistent approach to estimate the behavior of Zn-Cu-Ti sheets under different forming conditions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Finite Element Model Updating Combined with Multi-Response Optimization for Hyper-Elastic Materials Characterization
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071019 - 27 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The experimental stress-strain curves from the standardized tests of Tensile, Plane Stress, Compression, Volumetric Compression, and Shear, are normally used to obtain the invariant λi and constants of material Ci that will define the behavior elastomers. Obtaining these experimental curves requires the [...] Read more.
The experimental stress-strain curves from the standardized tests of Tensile, Plane Stress, Compression, Volumetric Compression, and Shear, are normally used to obtain the invariant λi and constants of material Ci that will define the behavior elastomers. Obtaining these experimental curves requires the use of expensive and complex experimental equipment. For years, a direct method called model updating, which is based on the combination of parameterized finite element (FE) models and experimental force-displacement curves, which are simpler and more economical than stress-strain curves, has been used to obtain the Ci constants. Model updating has the disadvantage of requiring a high computational cost when it is used without the support of any known optimization method or when the number of standardized tests and required Ci constants is high. This paper proposes a methodology that combines the model updating method, the mentioned standardized tests and the multi-response surface method (MRS) with desirability functions to automatically determine the most appropriate Ci constants for modeling the behavior of a group of elastomers. For each standardized test, quadratic regression models were generated for modeling the error functions (ER), which represent the distance between the force-displacement curves that were obtained experimentally and those that were obtained by means of the parameterized FE models. The process of adjusting each Ci constant was carried out with desirability functions, considering the same value of importance for all of the standardized tests. As a practical example, the proposed methodology was validated with the following elastomers: nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and polyurethane (PUR). Mooney–Rivlin, Ogden, Arruda–Boyce and Gent were considered as the hyper-elastic models for modeling the mechanical behavior of the mentioned elastomers. The validation results, after the Ci parameters were adjusted, showed that the Mooney–Rivlin model was the hyper-elastic model that has the least error of all materials studied (MAEnorm = 0.054 for NBR, MAEnorm = 0.127 for NBR, MAEnorm = 0.116 for EVA and MAEnorm = 0.061 for NBR). The small error obtained in the adjustment of the Ci constants, as well as the computational cost of new materials, suggests that the methodology that this paper proposes could be a simpler and more economical alternative to use to obtain the optimal Ci constants of any type of elastomer than other more sophisticated methods. Full article
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