Special Issue "Tribological Challenges in Extreme Environments"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luis Norberto López De Lacalle
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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering (High Performance Manufacturing Group), University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Parque Tecnológico de Zamudio 202, 48170 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: manufacturing process; aeronautics; machine tools; Industry 4.0; machining
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Dr. Octavio Pereira Neto
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Guest Editor
High Performance Manufacturing research group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Basque Country; EIB, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: green manufactuing; lubri-cooling processes; cryogenics manufacturing processes; friction and wear; rheology; coatings; life cycle assessment
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Dr. Antonio J. Sánchez Egea
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Guest Editor
Centre of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Aeronautics CFAA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Basque Country; EIB, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extreme temperature affects viscosity and surfaces characteristics which are closely related with friction, durability and performance. Cryogenic and high temperature condition can be caused by the environment and final application, such as space, satellite or can be induced by processing methods. In space the use of solid lubricants is a classic application, basically using molybdenum sulfur or similar, including new coatings based on PVD technology. Other fields are scientific devices, in which oxygen-free copper is massively used, and devices are designed to work in near to zero or over 1200 Kelvin condition. In other cases, cryogenics gases and solid lubricants (graphite-base) are proposed, for instance in manufacturing processes, in which LN2 or CO2 are now being proposed as alternatives to emulsion coolants, working alone or in combination with minimum quantity of lubricants. The challenge is great, but the savings using cries cooling are very interesting.

This Special Issue aims the latest advances in tribological challenges in extreme environments. Contributions are welcome from both academic researchers and their industrial peers dealing with innovating novel cryogenics applications and revealing compatibilities with other solid lubricants.

This Special Issue will cover the following topics:

  • Behavior of lubricants under extreme temperature
  • Solid lubricants and applications
  • Cryogenics in manufacturing processes
  • Friction and wear in low temperature systems: artic engineering and offshore.
  • Rheology of oils in relation to temperature.
  • Space applications
  • Testing under low temperatures
  • Coatings with special application to extreme conditions.
  • Tribology and lubricants of aero-turbines.

Prof. Dr. Luis Norberto López de Lacalle
Dr. Octavio Pereira Neto
Dr. Antonio J. Sánchez Egea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Cryogenic Milling: Study of the Effect of CO2 Cooling on Tool Wear When Machining Inconel 718, Grade EA1N Steel and Gamma TiAl
Lubricants 2019, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7010010 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The need for machining advanced materials has increased exponentially in recent years. Ni-based alloys, Ti-based alloys or some steel grades are commonly used in transport, energy generation or biomedicine industries due to their excellent properties that combine hardness, high temperature strength and corrosion [...] Read more.
The need for machining advanced materials has increased exponentially in recent years. Ni-based alloys, Ti-based alloys or some steel grades are commonly used in transport, energy generation or biomedicine industries due to their excellent properties that combine hardness, high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. These desirable properties make such alloys extremely difficult to machine, inducing a quick cutting tool wear that must be overcome. In the last decade, cryogenic machining has emerged in order to improve the machining of these materials. By means of cryogenic fluids such as cutting coolants, significant improvements in the life of cutting tools are obtained. However, most studies on this new technology are focused on turning processes, because of the difficulty of introducing cryogenic fluids through a rotary tool in processes such as drilling and milling. In this study, a cryogenic milling system integrated within the tool holder is used for milling Gamma TiAl, Inconel 718 and grade EA1N steel using carbon dioxide as a coolant. This system has been compared with the traditional cooling method (emulsion) in terms of tool life to check if it is possible to improve the machining operation in terms of efficiency by supplying the cryogenic coolant directly to the cutting zone. The results show that by replacing traditional pollutant cooling fluids with other more ecologically-friendly alternatives, it is possible to improve tool life by 100% and 175% in the cases of Gamma TiAl and grade EA1N steel, respectively, when using the new delivery system for the coolant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribological Challenges in Extreme Environments)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Study of Tribological Behavior of Electroless Ni–B, Ni–B–Mo, and Ni–B–W Coatings at Room and High Temperatures
Lubricants 2018, 6(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants6030067 - 02 Aug 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Ni–B alloys deposited by the electroless method are considered to be hard variants of the electroless nickel family. Inclusion of Mo or W to form ternary alloys improves the thermal stability of electroless nickel coatings. Therefore, in the present work, Ni–B, Ni–B–Mo, and [...] Read more.
Ni–B alloys deposited by the electroless method are considered to be hard variants of the electroless nickel family. Inclusion of Mo or W to form ternary alloys improves the thermal stability of electroless nickel coatings. Therefore, in the present work, Ni–B, Ni–B–Mo, and Ni–B–W coatings are deposited; and their tribological behavior at room and high temperatures are investigated. Electroless Ni–B, Ni–B–Mo, and Ni–B–W coatings are deposited on AISI 1040 steel substrates. The coatings are heat treated to improve their mechanical properties and crystallinity. Tribological behavior of the coatings is determined on a pin-on-disc type tribological test setup using various applied normal loads (10–50 N) and sliding speeds (0.25–0.42 m/s) to measure wear and coefficient of friction at different operating temperatures (25 °C–500 °C). Ni–B–W coatings are observed to have higher wear resistance than Ni–B or Ni–B–Mo coatings throughout the temperature range considered. Although for coefficient of friction, no such trend is observed. The worn surface of the coatings at 500 °C is characterized by lubricious oxide glazes, which lead to enhanced tribological behavior compared with that at 100 °C. A study of the coating characteristics such as composition, phase transformations, surface morphology, and microhardness is also carried out prior to tribological tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribological Challenges in Extreme Environments)
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