Special Issue "Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fernando Herranz
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Química Médica, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanomedicine; molecular imaging; iron oxide nanoparticles; atherosclerosis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Juan Pellico
Website
Guest Editor
School of Biomedical Engineering & Imaging Sciences, King's College London, London, UK
Interests: nanomedicine; contrast agents; magnetic resonance imaging; molecular imaging; bioconjugation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of nanoparticles for biomedical applications expands from biosensing to treatment and diagnosis, involving many aspects of the clinical routine. From a more basic point of view, research has focused on new synthetic methods with increased repoducibility and yield. Features like core composition and morphology, coating composition and structure are key to define their physicochemical properties. These properties determine their final use as diagnostic or therapeutic tools. In diagnosis the use of nanoparticles is increasingly important in molecular imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) or fluorescence imaging. While in therapeutic areas their importance is long known: from liposomes for drug delivery, to iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia or metallic nanoparticles as novel antimicrobials. Finally, for their application in biomedicine, it is necessary to achieve a deep characterisation of their interactions with different biomolecules in vivo, i.e. to study the protein corona that surrounds them once in vivo.

This Special Issue is devoted to any biomedical application where the use of nanoparticles is key, as well as to their synthesis, characterisation, and bioconjugation.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Magnetic nanoparticles as MRI probes (T1 and/or T2)
  • Nanoparticles as in vitro sensors
  • Hyperthermia
  • Nanoparticle-based Molecular imaging
  • Nanoparticle-based therapies: oncology, cardiovascular or infectious diseases
  • New synthetic methods
  • Bioconjugation of nanoparticles for biomedicine
  • Protein corona and nanoparticles

Dr. Fernando Herranz
Dr. Juan Pellico
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Magnetic nanoparticles as MRI probes (T1 and/or T2)
  • Nanoparticles as in vitro sensors
  • Hyperthermia
  • Nanoparticle-based Molecular imaging
  • Nanoparticle-based therapies: oncology, cardiovascular or infectious diseases
  • New synthetic methods
  • Bioconjugation of nanoparticles for biomedicine
  • Protein corona and nanoparticles

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Magnetic and Golden Yogurts. Food as a Potential Nanomedicine Carrier
Materials 2020, 13(2), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020481 - 19 Jan 2020
Abstract
Yogurt is one of the most emblematic and popular fermented foods. It is produced by the fermentation of milk lactose by bacteria such as Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Magnetic (MNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were incorporated into the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) of [...] Read more.
Yogurt is one of the most emblematic and popular fermented foods. It is produced by the fermentation of milk lactose by bacteria such as Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Magnetic (MNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were incorporated into the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) of these bacteria. The functionalized bacteria were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A large number of MNPs and AuNPs were bound to the bacterial EPS. Interestingly, the nanoparticles’ (NPs) presence did not affect the bacteria’s capacity to ferment milk and to produce magnetic and golden yogurts. Magnetic and golden yogurts represent the perfect combination of emblematic food and nanoparticles and have a range of potential biomedical applications: use in iron-deficiency anemia, diagnosis and hyperthermia treatment of appropriate digestive diseases, and interest in glamour cuisine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Understanding the Influence of a Bifunctional Polyethylene Glycol Derivative in Protein Corona Formation around Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2218; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142218 - 10 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are one of the most prominent agents used in theranostic applications, with MRI imaging the main application assessed. The biomolecular interface formed on the surface of a nanoparticle in a biological medium determines its behaviour in vitro and in [...] Read more.
Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are one of the most prominent agents used in theranostic applications, with MRI imaging the main application assessed. The biomolecular interface formed on the surface of a nanoparticle in a biological medium determines its behaviour in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we have compared the formation of the protein corona on highly monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with two different coatings, dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and after conjugation, with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derived molecule (2000 Da) in the presence of Wistar rat plasma. The protein fingerprints around the nanoparticles were analysed in an extensive proteomic study. The results presented in this work indicate that the composition of the protein corona is very difficult to predict. Proteins from different functional categories—cell components, lipoproteins, complement, coagulation, immunoglobulins, enzymes and transport proteins—were identified in all samples with very small variability. Although both types of nanoparticles have similar amounts of bonded proteins, very slight differences in the composition of the corona might explain the variation observed in the uptake and biotransformation of these nanoparticles in Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 cells. Cytotoxicity was also studied using a standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Controlling nanoparticles’ reactivity to the biological environment by deciding on its surface functionalization may suggest new routes in the control of the biodistribution, biodegradation and clearance of multifunctional nanomedicines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Magnetic Nanoparticles Supporting Bio-responsive T1/T2 Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244096 - 07 Dec 2019
Abstract
The use of nanoparticulate systems as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well-established and known to facilitate an enhanced image sensitivity within scans of a particular pathological region of interest. Such a capability can enable both a non-invasive diagnosis and the [...] Read more.
The use of nanoparticulate systems as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well-established and known to facilitate an enhanced image sensitivity within scans of a particular pathological region of interest. Such a capability can enable both a non-invasive diagnosis and the monitoring of disease progression/response to treatment. In this review, magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit a bio-responsive MR relaxivity are discussed, with pH-, enzyme-, biomolecular-, and protein-responsive systems considered. The ability of a contrast agent to respond to a biological stimulus provides not only enriched diagnostic capabilities over corresponding non-responsive analogues, but also an improved longitudinal monitoring of specific physiological conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Use of a Bioengineered Antioxidant in Mouse Models of Metabolic Syndrome"

Deric M. Griffin, Brittany R. Bitner, Zachary Criss II, Daniela Marcano, Jacob M. Berlin, Thomas A. Kent, Susan L. Samson, James M. Tour *, and Robia G. Pautler *

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of conditions that increase the risk of developing heart disease, stroke and type-2 diabetes and is present in 35% of US adults. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MetS, however, antioxidants such as vitamin E have had limited success in the clinic. This prompts the question of what effects a more potent antioxidant might produce. A prime candidate is the recently developed bioengineered antioxidant, poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized hydrophilic carbon clusters (PEG-HCCs), which is capable of neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical at 106/molecule of PEG-HCC.

Results: PEG-HCC treatment lessened lipid peroxidation, aspartate aminotransferase levels, non[fasting blood glucose levels and JNK phosphorylation in ob/ob mice. PEG-HCC treated WT mice had an increased response to insulin by ITT and a decrease in blood glucose by GTT. These effects were not observed in HFD-fed mice, regardless of treatment. PEG-HCCs were observed in the interstitial space of liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. No significant difference was shown in gluconeogenesis or inflammatory gene expression between treatment and dietary groups.

Conclusions: PEG-HCC can improve some parameters of disease in these models and this may be due to a resulting increase in peripheral insulin sensitivity. However, additional studies are needed to elucidate how PEG-HCCs are producing these effects.

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