Special Issue "Lanthanide-Based Multifunctional Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Baisch
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Malta, Msida, Malta

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to address both scientists working in the field of lanthanide-based compounds and materials, as well as researchers whose field of interest is mainly multifunctional materials.
Multifunctional materials research is a new emerging and ever growing section in the field of applied materials science. As in every new research area, the exact definition and nomenclature is still a subject of discussion, however, the scientific community roughly settled with the following definition: Multifunctional Materials (MFM) form part of the broader group of Multifunctional Materials Systems (MFMS). Apart from the former, the latter also includes Multifunctional Composites (MFC) and Multifunctional Structures (MFS). The differences between the subgroups lie within the level homogeneity. MFMs are single materials, consisting of one or more compounds joined or mixed together indistinguishably. These include inorganic and organic compounds, as well as compounds formed by one or more molecules, ions, frameworks or metals. All of those, however, have in common to be able to have multiple functions on molecular or nanoscale level. Examples can be carbon nanotube-based materials, which fulfil the function of a battery and that of a flexible polymer, or a pharmaceutical compound, which fulfils the role an API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) but also of a carrier molecule for other APIs. One can imagine a very extensive list of novel materials with a very useful set of combined physical or chemical properties. Whereas the main focus in recent reviews about MFMs was the actual definition of the field and the exploration of its potential, this Special Issue will exploit and evidence the importance and immense potential of lanthanide-based compounds in the world of MFMs. Many scientists working in the field of lanthanide chemistry and lanthanide-based materials science might not even be aware that actual multi-functional materials have been synthesized in their research group in the past. Reasons for this lie in the unique and cross-disciplinary properties of the lanthanide elements. The same lanthanide ion may not only be used to form highly porous molecular frameworks, the same framework material might also exhibit unique magnetic or fluorescence properties.
It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Baisch
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Lanthanides
  • Rare Earths
  • Multifunctional Materials
  • Crystal Engineering
  • Metal-Organic Frameworks
  • Coordination Polymers
  • Nanoscience
  • Composite materials
  • Coordination Chemistry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Investigation and Thermodynamic Calculation of Ni–Al–La Ternary System in Nickel-Rich Region: A New Intermetallic Compound Ni2AlLa
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122396 - 28 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The phase equilibrium of the Ni–Al–La ternary system in a nickel-rich region was observed at 800 °C and 1000 °C using scanning electron microscopy backscattered electron imaging, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffractometry. The solubility of Al in the Ni5La [...] Read more.
The phase equilibrium of the Ni–Al–La ternary system in a nickel-rich region was observed at 800 °C and 1000 °C using scanning electron microscopy backscattered electron imaging, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffractometry. The solubility of Al in the Ni5La phase was remeasured at 800 °C and 1000 °C. Herein, we report a new ternary phase, termed Ni2AlLa, confirmed at 800 °C. Its X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was indexed and space group determined using Total Pattern Solution (TOPAS), and the suitable lattice parameters were fitted using the Pawley method and selected-area electron diffraction. Ni2AlLa crystallizes in the trigonal system with a space group R3 (no. 146), a = 4.1985 Å and c = 13.6626 Å. A self-consistent set of thermodynamic parameters for the Al–La and Ni–La binary systems and the Ni–Al–La ternary system includes a Ni2AlLa ternary phase, which was optimized using the CALPHAD method. The calculated thermodynamic and phase-equilibria data for the binary and ternary systems are consistent with the literature and measured data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lanthanide-Based Multifunctional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Samarium on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy Treated by Ultrasonic Vibration
Materials 2018, 11(11), 2331; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112331 - 20 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effects of samarium (Sm) on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of AZ91 magnesium alloy treated by ultrasonic vibration were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the addition of Sm resulted in [...] Read more.
The effects of samarium (Sm) on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of AZ91 magnesium alloy treated by ultrasonic vibration were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the addition of Sm resulted in the formation of Al2Sm, which reduced the volume fraction of the β-Mg17Al12 phase and changed its morphology to fine granular. The AZ91–Sm alloys treated by ultrasonic vibration revealed relatively lower weight loss, hydrogen evolution, and corrosion current density values compared to the ultrasonic-treated AZ91 alloy prepared without Sm. Locally, a coarse β phase in the ultrasonic-treated AZ91 alloy accelerated the possibility of micro-galvanic corrosion growing into the matrix. In the prepared AZ91–Sm alloys treated by ultrasonic vibration, the fine β and Al2Sm phases reduced the probability of micro-galvanic corrosion growth and, therefore, formed a uniform corrosion layer on the surface of the alloys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lanthanide-Based Multifunctional Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Passive Q-Switching by Cr4+:YAG Saturable Absorber of Buried Depressed-Cladding Waveguides Obtained in Nd-Doped Media by Femtosecond Laser Beam Writing
Materials 2018, 11(9), 1689; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091689 - 12 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
We report on laser performances obtained in Q-switch mode operation from buried depressed-cladding waveguides of circular shape (100 μm diameter) that were inscribed in Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 media by direct writing with a femtosecond laser beam. The Q-switch operation was realized with [...] Read more.
We report on laser performances obtained in Q-switch mode operation from buried depressed-cladding waveguides of circular shape (100 μm diameter) that were inscribed in Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 media by direct writing with a femtosecond laser beam. The Q-switch operation was realized with a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber, aiming to obtain laser pulses of moderate (few μJ) energy at high (tens to hundreds kHz) repetition rate. An average power of 0.52 W at 1.06 μm consisting of a train of pulses of 7.79 μJ energy at 67 kHz repetition rate, was obtained from a waveguide realized in a 4.8 mm long, 1.1-at % Nd:YAG ceramics; the pulse peak power reached 1.95 kW. A similar waveguide that was inscribed in a 3.4 mm long, 1.0-at % Nd:YVO4 crystal yielded laser pulses with 9.4 μJ energy at 83 kHz repetition rate (at 0.77 W average power) and 1.36 kW peak power. The laser performances obtained in continuous-wave operation were discussed for each waveguide used in the experiments. Thus, a continuous-wave output power of 1.45 W was obtained from the circular buried depressed-cladding waveguide inscribed in the 1.1-at %, 4.8 mm long Nd:YAG; the overall optical-to-optical efficiency, with respect to the absorbed pump power, was 0.21. The waveguide inscribed in the 1.0-at %, 3.4 mm long Nd:YVO4 crystal yielded 1.85 W power at 0.26 overall optical efficiency. This work shows the possibility to build compact laser systems with average-to-high peak power pulses based on waveguides realized by a femtosecond (fs) laser beam direct writing technique and that are pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lanthanide-Based Multifunctional Materials)
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