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Special Issue "New Trends of Functional Materials for Wastewater Treatment Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2023 | Viewed by 2035

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chiharu Tokoro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
Interests: mineral processing; recycling; wastewater treatment; separation; powder simulation; geochemical modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Toyohisa Fujita
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China
Interests: mineral processing; recycling; wastewater treatment; nanomaterials; magnetic fluid; environmental cleaning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wastewater contains inorganic ions, dissolved organic molecules, fine-to-large particles, and microorganisms, and is treated by various methods, from basic to actual treatment, considering cost. In regards to this area of research, we would like to discuss the potential of treating wastewater using functional materials and a combination of various other treatment methods and systems. For example, the following functional materials could be used for this purpose: membrane, inorganic (organic) layered material, organic polymer, modified bio sorbent, fouling prevention material, aerobatic or anaerobiotic materials, magnetic material, photochemical material, new ion exchange material, radical production material, catalyst, new solvent extraction material, ion liquid utilization, desalination system, and so on.

In addition, the following combinations of wastewater treatment methods with functional materials are considered: aerobic and anaerobic treatment, oxidation, reduction, precipitation, coagulation, stabilization, sorption, solvent extraction, bioremediation, microbial utilization, bacteria leaching, electric and magnetic field utilization, centrifugation, filtration, reverse osmosis, utilization of wastes, radioactive material treatment, recycling, and so on.

As the example mentioned above, many kinds of papers that describe the use of new materials are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Chiharu Tokoro
Prof. Dr. Toyohisa Fujita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste water
  • functional material
  • membrane
  • layered material
  • polymer
  • sorbent
  • photochemical
  • ion exchange
  • radical

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Magnetic Composites (γ-Al2O3/TiO2/γ-Fe2O3) as Ozone Catalysts in Wastewater Treatment
Materials 2022, 15(23), 8459; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15238459 - 28 Nov 2022
Viewed by 357
Abstract
Using municipal sewage as a source of reclaimed water is an important way to alleviate the shortage of water resources. At present, advanced oxidation technology (AOPs), represented by ozone oxidation, is widely used in wastewater treatment. In this study, γ-Al2O3 [...] Read more.
Using municipal sewage as a source of reclaimed water is an important way to alleviate the shortage of water resources. At present, advanced oxidation technology (AOPs), represented by ozone oxidation, is widely used in wastewater treatment. In this study, γ-Al2O3, a low-cost traditional ozone catalyst, was selected as the matrix. By modifying magnetic γ-Fe2O3 with a titanate coupling agent, in situ deposition, and calcination, the final formation of a γ-Al2O3/TiO2/γ-Fe2O3 micrometer ozone catalyst was achieved. A variety of material characterization methods were used to demonstrate that the required material was successfully prepared. The catalyst powder particles have strong magnetic properties, form aggregates easily, and have good precipitation and separation properties. Subsequently, ibuprofen was used as the degradation substrate to investigate the ozone catalytic performance of the prepared catalyst, and this proved that it had good ozone catalytic activity. The degradation process was also analyzed. The results showed that in the ozone system, some of the ibuprofen molecules will be oxidized to form 1,4-propanal phenylacetic acid, which is then further oxidized to form 1,4-acetaldehyde benzoic acid and p-phenylacetaldehyde. Finally, the prepared catalyst was applied to the actual wastewater treatment process, and it also had good catalytic performance in this context. GC–MS detection of the water samples after treatment showed that the types of organic matter in the water were significantly reduced, among which nine pollutants with high content, such as bisphenol A and sulfamethoxazole, were not detected after treatment. Full article
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Article
Chestnut Shell-Activated Carbon Mixed with Pyrolytic Snail Shells for Methylene Blue Adsorption
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228227 - 19 Nov 2022
Viewed by 265
Abstract
Activated carbon has been used to treat organic dyes in water systems; however, the adsorption capacity of the samples studied was limited by the specific surface area and influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution. In this study, a hybrid adsorbent consisting [...] Read more.
Activated carbon has been used to treat organic dyes in water systems; however, the adsorption capacity of the samples studied was limited by the specific surface area and influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution. In this study, a hybrid adsorbent consisting of a mixture (MCS) of activated chestnut shell biochar (CN) and pyrolyzed snail shell material (SS) was developed to solve this problem, with the waste snail shell samples being processed by pyrolysis and the chestnut shell samples chemically pretreated and then pyrolyzed. The BET and SEM results revealed that the SS had a mesoporous fluffy structure with a higher specific surface (1705 m2/g) and an average pore diameter of about 4.07 nm, providing a large number of sites for adsorption. In addition, XPS and FTIR results showed that the main component of SS was calcium oxide, and it also contained a certain amount of calcium carbonate, which not only provided an alkaline environment for the adsorption of biochar but also degradation and photocatalytic capabilities. The results showed that the MCS3-1 sample, obtained when CN and SS were mixed in the ratio of 3:1, had good capacity for adsorption for methylene blue (MB), with 1145 mg/g at an initial concentration of 1300 mg/L (92% removal rate). The adsorption behaviors were fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, which indicated that the adsorption was multilayer chemisorption with a saturated adsorption capacity of 1635 mg/g. The photocatalytic capacity from the SS composition was about 89 mg/g, and the sorption of MB dye onto the sorbent reached equilibrium after 300 min. The results suggested that MCS3-1 has enormous potential for removing MB from wastewater. Full article
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Article
Efficient Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Cobalt Supported Used Resin Based Carbon Ball Catalyst for the Degradation of Ibuprofen
Materials 2022, 15(14), 5003; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15145003 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
The extensive use of ibuprofen (IBU) and other pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) causes them widely to exist in nature and be frequently detected in water bodies. Advanced catalytic oxidation processes (AOPs) are often used as an efficient way to degrade them, [...] Read more.
The extensive use of ibuprofen (IBU) and other pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) causes them widely to exist in nature and be frequently detected in water bodies. Advanced catalytic oxidation processes (AOPs) are often used as an efficient way to degrade them, and the research on heterogeneous catalysts has become a hot spot in the field of AOPs. Among transitional metal-based catalysts, metal cobalt has been proved to be an effective element in activating peroxymonosulfate (PMS) to produce strong oxidizing components. In this study, the used D001 resin served as the matrix material and through simple impregnation and calcination, cobalt was successfully fixed on the carbon ball in the form of cobalt sulfide. When the catalyst was used to activate persulfate to degrade IBU, it was found that under certain reaction conditions, the degradation rate in one hour could exceed 70%, which was far higher than that of PMS and resin carbon balls alone. Here, we discussed the effects of catalyst loading, PMS concentration, pH value and temperature on IBU degradation. Through quenching experiments, it was found that SO4 and ·OH played a major role in the degradation process. The material has the advantages of simple preparation, low cost and convenient recovery, as well as realizing the purpose of reuse and degrading organic pollutants efficiently. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: A critical review on low-cost modification material derived snail material for wastewater treatment
Author:
Highlights: sea material, snail adsorption, modified biochar, water contamination.

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