Special Issue "Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Alberto D’Amore

Guest Editor
University of Campania ”Luigi Vanvitelli”, Department of Engineering, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE), Italy
Interests: Relaxations and viscoelasticity in poymeric glasses, mechanical properties of polymers and composites, fatigue, biomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague, 

I have been invited as Guest Editor for a Special Issue of Materials on “Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites”. Both “fatigue” and “damage mechanisms” of polymeric composites are “open” chapters within the area of materials engineering and science, and many issues around these subjects are debated. These include, but are not limited to, fatigue under constant and variable amplitude loadings, responses of laminates under low-velocity impact loading, the effects of temperature and frequency under dynamic loadings. Contributions on the above and related subjects from both the theoretical and the phenomenological point of view are welcome. However, circumventing the subject complexity requires multidisciplinary approaches from both academic and industrial researchers, and this is the reason why mechanical and aerospace engineers and materials scientists are kindly invited to contribute to this Special Issue.

My Best Regards

Prof. Alberto D'Amore
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Fatigue
  • Low-velocity impact
  • Strength
  • Temperature effects
  • Rate-of-loading effects

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Quantitative Analysis of Crack Precursor Size for Rubber Composites
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3442; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203442 - 21 Oct 2019
Abstract
In the field of engineering, the annual economic loss caused by material fatigue failure reaches 4% of the total economic output. The deep understanding of rubber fatigue failure can help develop and prepare rubber composites with high durability. The crack precursor sizes within [...] Read more.
In the field of engineering, the annual economic loss caused by material fatigue failure reaches 4% of the total economic output. The deep understanding of rubber fatigue failure can help develop and prepare rubber composites with high durability. The crack precursor sizes within the rubber composites are vital for the material mechanical and fatigue properties. In this study, we adopted three different characterization methods to analyze crack precursor sizes and their distribution. First, based on the theoretical formula of fracture mechanics, the size of the crack precursor was deduced from 180 μm to 500 μm by the uniaxial tensile experiment combined with tear test (nicked angle tear, planar tear and trouser tear). Second, by combining the uniaxial fatigue test of dumbbell specimen with the fatigue crack growth rate test, the average size of the crack precursor was calculated as 3.3 μm based on the Thomas fatigue crack growth model. Third, the average size of the crack precursor was 3.6 μm obtained by scanning electron microscope. Through theoretical calculations and experimental tests, the size and distribution of the crack precursors of rubber composites were systematically presented. This work can provide theoretical guidance for the improvement of fatigue performance of rubber composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Study of Phenomenological Residual Strength Models for Composite Materials Subjected to Fatigue: Predictions at Constant Amplitude (CA) Loading
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203398 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The most popular methods of characterizing a composite’s fatigue properties and predicting its life are phenomenological, meaning the micro-mechanisms of composite structures under cyclic loading are not treated. In addition, in order to characterize the fatigue properties, only macro-parameters, namely strength and/or stiffness, [...] Read more.
The most popular methods of characterizing a composite’s fatigue properties and predicting its life are phenomenological, meaning the micro-mechanisms of composite structures under cyclic loading are not treated. In addition, in order to characterize the fatigue properties, only macro-parameters, namely strength and/or stiffness, are adopted. Residual strength models are mostly used in practice, given their strong relationship with safety and reliability. Indeed, since failure occurs when the strength degrades to the peak stress of fatigue loading, the remaining strength is used as a failure index. In this paper, based on a wide set of literature data, we summarize the capabilities of four models, namely Caprino’s, D’Amore’s, Sendekyj’s, and Kassapoglou’s models. The models are briefly described and then applied to the same data set, which is re-elaborated. The selected experimental data are recovered from a large experimental campaign carried out by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Specimens of the same material were subjected to different loading in terms of peak stress, σmax, and stress ratio, R = σminmax, ranging from pure tension (0 < R < 1) to prevalent tension (−1 < R < 0) to tension-compression (R = −1) to pure compression (1 < R < ∞). The data represent a formidable test bed to comparatively evaluate the models’ capabilities and their predictive prerogatives. The models are also tested with respect to their ability to replicate the principal responses’ feature of composite materials subjected to constant amplitude (CA) loadings. It is shown that Caprino’s and D’Amore’s models are equally capable of adequately fitting the experimental fatigue life data under given loading conditions and predicting the fatigue behavior at different loading ratios, R, with two fixed parameters. Sendekyj’s model required different parameters’ sets for each loading condition, and Kassapoglou’s model was unable to fit the majority of fatigue life data. When compared on the basis of the residual strength data, only the recently developed D’Amore’s model revealed its reliability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Principal Features of Fatigue and Residual Strength of Composite Materials Subjected to Constant Amplitude (CA) Loading
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2586; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162586 - 14 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
This paper summarizes the principal features of composites’ responses when subjected to constant amplitude (CA) cyclic loadings. The stochastic nature of the responses; the absence of a detectable fatigue limit; the sudden drop of strength; the general validity of the strength-life equal-rank assumption [...] Read more.
This paper summarizes the principal features of composites’ responses when subjected to constant amplitude (CA) cyclic loadings. The stochastic nature of the responses; the absence of a detectable fatigue limit; the sudden drop of strength; the general validity of the strength-life equal-rank assumption (SLERA); and, ultimately, the residual strength-life equal-rank assumption (RSLERA) are discussed on the basis of the selected experimental data available in literature. The objective is defining a robust test in order to ascertain the reliability of the phenomenological models. A two-parameter phenomenological model accounting for the maximum cyclic stress, σmax, and the stress ratio, R = σminmax, was used for guidance through the phenomenology of fatigue. It is concluded that the robustness of the models dealing with fatigue can be checked only when the characteristics of the composites’ responses are described simultaneously with fixed parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Constitutive Modeling of the Tensile Behavior of Recycled Polypropylene-Based Composites
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152419 - 29 Jul 2019
Abstract
The effect of reprocessing on the quasi-static uniaxial tensile behavior of two commercial polypropylene (PP)-based composites is experimentally investigated and modeled. In particular, the studied materials consist of an unfilled high-impact PP and a talc-filled high-impact PP. These PP composites are subjected to [...] Read more.
The effect of reprocessing on the quasi-static uniaxial tensile behavior of two commercial polypropylene (PP)-based composites is experimentally investigated and modeled. In particular, the studied materials consist of an unfilled high-impact PP and a talc-filled high-impact PP. These PP composites are subjected to repeated processing cycles, including a grinding step and an extrusion step to simulate recycling at the laboratory level, the selected reprocessing numbers for this study being 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Because the repeated reprocessing leads to thermo-mechanical degradation by chain scission mechanisms, the tensile behavior of the two materials exhibits a continuous decrease of elastic modulus and failure strain with the increasing amount of reprocessing. A physically consistent three-dimensional constitutive model is used to predict the tensile response of non-recycled materials with strain rate dependence. For the recycled materials, the reprocessing effect is accounted by incorporating the reprocessing sensitive coefficient into the constitutive model for Young’s modulus, failure strain, softening, and hardening equations. Our predictions of true stress—true strain curves for non-recycled and recycled 108MF97 and 7510—are in good agreement with experimental data and can be useful for industries and companies which are looking for a model able to predict the recycling effect on mechanical behavior of polymer-based materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Properties and Damage Mechanisms of Polymeric Composites)
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