Special Issue "Biocompatible Surface Functionalization of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giuseppe Bardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials have become a consolidated technology over the last two decades. As we know, many nanotools contain toxic materials or specific dangerous synthesis by-products. On the other hand, they demonstrate important intrinsic features to be exploited in diagnostics (e.g., specific wavelength light emission or absorption) or drug delivery (e.g., pH-responsiveness). Full biocompatibility is needed to prepare successful nano-products for application in the biomedical field. This goal can be obtained by providing specific surface functionalization of the nanomaterials aimed at confining or abrogate their core toxicity. Common techniques of surface coating are currently exploited using biocompatible polymers, organic or biological molecules. These procedures are not always effective in biological environments. Major difficulties are related to the dispersion/aggregation of nanomaterials in colloidal suspensions and the stability of the attached biocompatible moieties.

The present Special Issue is aimed at providing novel approaches to biocompatible nanomaterials’ functionalization. The focus is on the biocompatibility, immune escape or immune-stimulation, and enhanced performances of nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Innovative research articles, as well as critical reviews of the literature, will be welcome to provide an expert opinion and critical discussion.

Dr. Giuseppe Bardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterials
  • biomedical applications
  • functionalization
  • biocompatibility
  • polymers
  • immune escape
  • immune stimulation
  • colloidal suspensions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
The Utilization of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Viral Nanoparticles
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2671; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172671 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Viral particles (VPs) have evolved so as to efficiently enter target cells and to deliver their genetic material. The current state of knowledge allows us to use VPs in the field of biomedicine as nanoparticles that are safe, easy to manipulate, inherently biocompatible, [...] Read more.
Viral particles (VPs) have evolved so as to efficiently enter target cells and to deliver their genetic material. The current state of knowledge allows us to use VPs in the field of biomedicine as nanoparticles that are safe, easy to manipulate, inherently biocompatible, biodegradable, and capable of transporting various cargoes into specific cells. Despite the fact that these virus-based nanoparticles constitute the most common vectors used in clinical practice, the need remains for further improvement in this area. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential for enhancing the efficiency and versatility of VPs via their functionalization with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), short peptides that are able to translocate across cellular membranes and to transport various substances with them. The review provides and describes various examples of and means of exploitation of CPPs in order to enhance the delivery of VPs into permissive cells and/or to allow them to enter a broad range of cell types. Moreover, it is possible that CPPs are capable of changing the immunogenic properties of VPs, which could lead to an improvement in their clinical application. The review also discusses strategies aimed at the modification of VPs by CPPs so as to create a useful cargo delivery tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Surface Functionalization of Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessReview
Protein Adsorption: A Feasible Method for Nanoparticle Functionalization?
Materials 2019, 12(12), 1991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12121991 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Nanomaterials are now well-established components of many sectors of science and technology. Their sizes, structures, and chemical properties allow for the exploration of a vast range of potential applications and novel approaches in basic research. Biomedical applications, such as drug or gene delivery, [...] Read more.
Nanomaterials are now well-established components of many sectors of science and technology. Their sizes, structures, and chemical properties allow for the exploration of a vast range of potential applications and novel approaches in basic research. Biomedical applications, such as drug or gene delivery, often require the release of nanoparticles into the bloodstream, which is populated by blood cells and a plethora of small peptides, proteins, sugars, lipids, and complexes of all these molecules. Generally, in biological fluids, a nanoparticle’s surface is covered by different biomolecules, which regulate the interactions of nanoparticles with tissues and, eventually, their fate. The adsorption of molecules onto the nanomaterial is described as “corona” formation. Every blood particulate component can contribute to the creation of the corona, although small proteins represent the majority of the adsorbed chemical moieties. The precise rules of surface-protein adsorption remain unknown, although the surface charge and topography of the nanoparticle seem to discriminate the different coronas. We will describe examples of adsorption of specific biomolecules onto nanoparticles as one of the methods for natural surface functionalization, and highlight advantages and limitations. Our critical review of these topics may help to design appropriate nanomaterials for specific drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Surface Functionalization of Nanomaterials)
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