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New Trends in Sustainable Building Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2024) | Viewed by 3727

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Technologies and Equipment for Materials Processing, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Technical University Gheorghe Asachi of Iasi, 700050 Iasi, Romania
Interests: materials science; durability of materials in civil engineering; sustainable cementitious materials; metallic alloys; biomaterials; biodegradable alloys; biomaterials characterization; coatings and thin films
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability is one of the topics that frequently comes up while talking about the future of construction.  It is obvious that more needs to be done by the construction sector to safeguard the environment. Encouraging sustainability will benefit both present and future generations.

Reduced energy consumption and judicious material selection are more important than ever because of the inevitable rise in housing difficulties and the effects of climate change on the world. Eco-friendly building materials are those that can be easily recycled and do not hurt the environment during their creation, usage, or disposal. In the long run, using eco-friendly materials is really advantageous. Green home construction dramatically lowers carbon emissions and uses less energy, which leads to lower energy costs.

This Special Issue is for the colleagues who are doing immense and unstoppable work for this field, to present the latest trends and research regarding the performing sustainable building materials of our days. All advances in building materials is welcome to be published and shared. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Madalina Simona Baltatu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable building materials
  • construction materials
  • smart solutions
  • waste management and utilization
  • environment efficiency
  • recycled materials
  • life cycle assessment
  • eco-friendly building materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 4198 KiB  
Article
Effects of Ultrafine Fly Ash against Sulphate Reaction in Concrete Structures
by Demet Demir Şahin and Hasan Eker
Materials 2024, 17(6), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17061442 - 21 Mar 2024
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Abstract
In this study, Afşin Elbistan C-type fly ash (FA) was used, which protects against the sulphate reaction that damages concrete. The detrimental effects of post-reaction decrease with increasing fly ash fineness. The study used 10%, 30%, and 50% weight substitutes of cement. The [...] Read more.
In this study, Afşin Elbistan C-type fly ash (FA) was used, which protects against the sulphate reaction that damages concrete. The detrimental effects of post-reaction decrease with increasing fly ash fineness. The study used 10%, 30%, and 50% weight substitutes of cement. The fly ash was ground in a ball mill for 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min, and Blaine fineness values of 1555, 1632, 2347, 2589, 2766, and 3433 cm2/g were obtained, respectively. The effect of the samples on the sulphate resistance was investigated by exposing the samples to 5% or 10% added sulphate solutions, and the compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of the concrete were tested. The compressive strength values obtained decreased with the increase in sulphate content, and the increase in the grinding time and the amount of substituted FA increased the compressive strength values. It was observed that weight loss increased with increasing sulphate content and decreased with the addition of FA with a high Blaine fineness. It was determined that as the Blaine fineness value increased, the sulphate content, FA substitution amount, and ultrasonic pulse speed decreased. This study was carried out to determine the effects of fly ash used at different fineness and replacement ratios on the performance and strength of concrete after exposure to external influences such as sulphate. The use of fly ash instead of cement will reduce the use of waste materials and natural resources and prevent environmental pollution. The cost of cement and concrete will be reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Sustainable Building Materials)
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22 pages, 6440 KiB  
Article
Environmentally Friendly Masonry Mortar Blended with Fly Ash, Corn Cob Ash or Ceramic Waste Powder
by Slobodan Šupić, Mirjana Malešev, Vladan Pantić, Ivan Lukić, Vlastimir Radonjanin, Miloš Ognjanović and Gordana Broćeta
Materials 2023, 16(20), 6725; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16206725 - 17 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Implementing a circular approach through waste valorization in mortar production with environmentally efficient mix design is a viable pathway for relieving the ecological burden of greenhouse gas emissions, resource depletion and waste management. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the [...] Read more.
Implementing a circular approach through waste valorization in mortar production with environmentally efficient mix design is a viable pathway for relieving the ecological burden of greenhouse gas emissions, resource depletion and waste management. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of using fly ash (FA), corn cob ash (CCA), and ceramic waste powder (CWP) as supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) in cement–lime masonry mortars. As part of an extensive experimental study, twelve mortar mixtures were made: three reference and nine blended, with mixing ratios of 1:1:5, 1:0.7:4.2, and 1:1:4 ((cement + SCM)/lime/sand), by volume. The examined properties include workability, compressive and flexural strengths, dry bulk density, capillary water absorption, adhesive bond strength, and water vapor permeability. The compressive and flexural strengths of tested mortars were notably impaired, with reductions of up to 60%, while the capillary water absorption coefficient rose by 100% compared to the reference values. The adhesive bond strength of some blended mortars exceeded the strength of the reference mortars. Nevertheless, all blended mortars fulfilled the requirements for general-purpose mortars, while the majority met the criteria for structural masonry applications. In addition, a performance-based index and weighting triangle were used for the comparison and ranking of all analyzed mortar mixtures. The findings of this study may herald a novel use of FA, CCA, and CWP as more eco-friendly binding materials in contemporary construction leading to the reduction in the process’s carbon footprint, the improvement in cost efficiency, and the mitigation of the detrimental environmental impact of waste disposal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Sustainable Building Materials)
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17 pages, 7365 KiB  
Article
Effects of Multiple Reflow on the Formation of Primary Crystals in Sn-3.5Ag and Solder Joint Strength: Experimental and Finite Element Analysis
by Siti Farahnabilah Muhd Amli, Mohd Arif Anuar Mohd Salleh, Mohd Sharizal Abdul Aziz, Hideyuki Yasuda, Kazuhiro Nogita, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri Abdullah, Ovidiu Nemes, Andrei Victor Sandu and Petrica Vizureanu
Materials 2023, 16(12), 4360; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16124360 - 13 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1352
Abstract
The growth and formation of primary intermetallics formed in Sn-3.5Ag soldered on copper organic solderability preservative (Cu-OSP) and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) surface finish after multiple reflows were systematically investigated. Real-time synchrotron imaging was used to investigate the microstructure, focusing on the [...] Read more.
The growth and formation of primary intermetallics formed in Sn-3.5Ag soldered on copper organic solderability preservative (Cu-OSP) and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) surface finish after multiple reflows were systematically investigated. Real-time synchrotron imaging was used to investigate the microstructure, focusing on the in situ growth behavior of primary intermetallics during the solid–liquid–solid interactions. The high-speed shear test was conducted to observe the correlation of microstructure formation to the solder joint strength. Subsequently, the experimental results were correlated with the numerical Finite Element (FE) modeling using ANSYS software to investigate the effects of primary intermetallics on the reliability of solder joints. In the Sn-3.5Ag/Cu-OSP solder joint, the well-known Cu6Sn5 interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) layer was observed in each reflow, where the thickness of the IMC layer increases with an increasing number of reflows due to the Cu diffusion from the substrate. Meanwhile, for the Sn-3.5Ag/ENIG solder joints, the Ni3Sn4 interfacial IMC layer was formed first, followed by the (Cu, Ni)6Sn5 IMC layer, where the formation was detected after five cycles of reflow. The results obtained from real-time imaging prove that the Ni layer from the ENIG surface finish possessed an effective barrier to suppress and control the Cu dissolution from the substrates, as there is no sizeable primary phase observed up to four cycles of reflow. Thus, this resulted in a thinner IMC layer and smaller primary intermetallics, producing a stronger solder joint for Sn-3.5Ag/ENIG even after the repeated reflow process relative to the Sn-3.5Ag/Cu-OSP joints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Sustainable Building Materials)
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