Special Issue "Organic-Semiconductor Based Devices"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Martin Weis
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Guest Editor
Organic Electronics Lab, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovakia
Interests: organic semiconductors; organic electronic devices; nanoparticles; charge transport phenomenon

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic electronics is still a very new interdisciplinary field of physics, chemistry, and electronics that offers new applications due to the almost unlimited variability of organic materials, low-cost fabrication, suitable electrical properties, mechanical flexibility, and optical transparency. The very first devices have already reached the market and the market share growth is amazing for such novel technology that is still improving day by day. The charge mobility has increased by several orders of magnitude in the last decades and device performance is now challenging inorganic semiconductor devices. On the other hand, although some basic principles have already been revealed, fundamental research is still needed for the further development of devices, since the underlaying physics is still unclear and working principles need to be clarified. Actually, it is fascinating to state that “yes, it works, but we are still not sure why”.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue that will be dedicated to the amazing field of organic semiconductors and organic electronic devices. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome. We expect submissions covering the following topics:

  • Challenges in the design, synthesis, and processing of organic materials
  • Molecular order, defects, and interfaces including nanocomposites
  • Characterization techniques for organic semiconductors and organic electronic devices
  • Organic materials for energy harvesting
  • Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)
  • Organic spintronics
  • Organic sensors and biosensors
  • Integration and technology for large areas and flexible electronics

The development of organic electronics is not only about the fundamental science, but it has significant industrial applications. Nowadays, organic electronics is present mostly in OLED displays, however our aim should be to find more common applications such as healthcare, photovoltaics, sensors, and low-power systems to improve the quality of life of human society by enabling high-end devices for everyone.

Assoc. Prof. Martin Weis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organic semiconductors
  • organic field-effect transistors
  • organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)
  • organic solar cells
  • organic spintronics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
P3HT Nanofibrils Thin-Film Transistors by Adsorbing Deposition in Suspension
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3643; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213643 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
A novel film preparation method utilizing polymer suspension, entitled adsorbing deposition in suspensions (ADS), has been proposed. The poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) toluene solution forms P3HT nanofibrils dispersed suspension by aging. P3HT nanofibrils are highly crystallized with sharp vibronic absorption spectra. By the ADS method, [...] Read more.
A novel film preparation method utilizing polymer suspension, entitled adsorbing deposition in suspensions (ADS), has been proposed. The poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) toluene solution forms P3HT nanofibrils dispersed suspension by aging. P3HT nanofibrils are highly crystallized with sharp vibronic absorption spectra. By the ADS method, only P3HT nanofibrils in suspension can be deposited on the substrate surface without any disordered fraction from the dissolved P3HT in suspension. Formed ADS film contains only the nanostructured conjugated polymer. Fabricated polymer thin-film transistor (TFT) utilizing ADS P3HT film shows good TFT performances with low off current, narrow subthreshold swing and large on/off current ratio. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Semiconductor Based Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Trap-Assisted Charge Injection into Large Bandgap Polymer Semiconductors
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152427 - 30 Jul 2019
Abstract
The trap-assisted charge injection in polyfluorene-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) model systems with an Al or Al/LiF cathode is investigated. We find that inserting 1.3 nm LiF increases electron and hole injections simultaneously and the increase of holes is greater than electrons. The evolution of [...] Read more.
The trap-assisted charge injection in polyfluorene-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) model systems with an Al or Al/LiF cathode is investigated. We find that inserting 1.3 nm LiF increases electron and hole injections simultaneously and the increase of holes is greater than electrons. The evolution of internal interfaces within polymer light-emitting diodes is observed by transmission electron microscopy, which reveals that the introduction of LiF improves the interface stability at both the cathode (cathode/polymer) and the anode (indium tin oxide (ITO)/PEDOT:PSS). Above-mentioned experimental results have been compared to the numerical simulations with a revised Davids model and potential physical mechanisms for the trap-assisted charge injection are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Semiconductor Based Devices)
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Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Multifunctional Operation of an Organic Device with Three-Dimensional Architecture
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081357 - 25 Apr 2019
Abstract
This work aims to show the feasibility of an innovative approach for the manufacturing of organic-based devices with a true three-dimensional and customizable structure that is made possible by plastic templates, fabricated by additive manufacturing methods, and coated by conducting organic thin films. [...] Read more.
This work aims to show the feasibility of an innovative approach for the manufacturing of organic-based devices with a true three-dimensional and customizable structure that is made possible by plastic templates, fabricated by additive manufacturing methods, and coated by conducting organic thin films. Specifically, a three-dimensional prototype based on a polyamide structure covered by poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) using the dip-coating technique demonstrated a multifunctional character. The prototype is indeed able to operate both as a three-terminal device showing the typical response of organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), with a higher amplification performance with respect to planar (2D) all-PEDOT:PSS OECTs, and as a two-terminal device able to efficiently implement a resistive sensing of water vaporization and perspiration, showing performances at least comparable to that of state-of-art resistive humidity sensors based on pristine PEDOT:PSS. To our knowledge, this is the first reported proof-of-concept of a true 3D structured OECT, obtained by exploiting a Selective laser sintering approach that, though simple in terms of 3D layout, paves the way for the integration of sensors based on OECTs into three-dimensional objects in various application areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Semiconductor Based Devices)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Triazine-Acceptor-Based Green Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Materials for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2646; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162646 - 20 Aug 2019
Abstract
High-efficiency thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) is leading the third-generation technology of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). TADF emitters are designed and synthesized using inexpensive organic donor and acceptor derivatives. TADF emitters are a potential candidate for next-generation display technology when compared with metal-complex-based [...] Read more.
High-efficiency thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) is leading the third-generation technology of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). TADF emitters are designed and synthesized using inexpensive organic donor and acceptor derivatives. TADF emitters are a potential candidate for next-generation display technology when compared with metal-complex-based phosphorescent dopants. Many studies are being conducted to enhance the external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) and photoluminescent quantum yield of green TADF devices. Blue TADF reached an EQE of over 35% with the support of suitable donor and acceptor moieties based on a suitable molecular design. The efficiencies of green TADF emitters can be improved when an appropriate molecular design is applied with an efficient device structure. The triazine acceptor has been identified as a worthy building block for green TADF emitters. Hence, we present here a review of triazine with various donor molecules and their device performances. This will help to design more suitable and efficient green TADF emitters for OLEDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Semiconductor Based Devices)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Innovative thermographic inspection of degradation in OPVs and OLEDs

Anna Stoynova

Unlike organic devices, their inorganic analogues are somewhat unstable and their performance degrades over time. The reliability of OLEDs and OPVs is crucial because of their degradation during storage and operation. The three physical mechanisms of degradation (interface conductive properties worsening; conjugation loss and irreversible deterioration of the active organic layers; mechanical disintegration of device) lead to changes in electrical properties and, in some cases, affect thermal behavior. The basic requirement of the absorbing or emissive technology with respect to products life is to ensure their quality and reliability. Stability for different OPVs applications requires different criteria. For solar cells, the requirements with the exposure to the external environment are different, and for the OLEDs it is important the fact that many organic molecules degrade when exposed to light. Known degradation mechanisms include diffusion of molecular oxygen and water into of interfaces, interlayer and electrode diffusion, electrode reaction with the organic materials, electrode oxidation, phase segregation or intermixing, delamination of any layer, and the formation of particles, bubbles, cracks etc. Various degradation mechanisms are associated with the bulk active layers and top contact. The use of flexible substrates for both technologies brings additional challenges. This chapter presents an innovative study of thermal behavior in degradation processes based on optimized thermographic non-destructive testing and diagnostics to improve products quality.

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