E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Kyung-Hoon Shin

Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology, Convergence College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, 55, Hanyangdaehak-ro, Sangrok-Gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, 15588, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: marine organic matter; marine biogeochemistry, stable isotope; organic biomarkers; aquatic ecology; marine food web; marine algae; phytoplankton productivity, bioactive compounds; organic geochemistry
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Se-Kwon Kim

Department of Marine Life Science, College of Ocean Science and Technology, Korea Maritime and Ocean University, 727, Taejong-ro, Youngdo-Gu, Busan, 606-91, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 82-51-629-7098
Fax: +82 51 629 7099
Interests: marine natural products; marine biotechnology, marine algae; anti-oxidant; anti-HIV; anti-cancer; anti-allergy; anti-Inflammation; marine cosmeceuticals; nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human skin is always exposed to ultraviolet radiation, which can cause damage, darken, and wrinkle skin. In recent days, significant development has been achieved in marine derived compounds for their utilization in cosmeceutical development due to their unique and potential uses as cures for various skin-based diseases.

Secondary metabolites, vitamins, carbohydrates, proteins, peptides and enzymes, lipids and phenolic compounds from marine organisms have effectively protected against UV-B-induced damages in skin. These compounds potentially develop as cosmeceuticals in the areas of anti-photoagaing, anti-wrinkle, UV blocking agents, skin whitening, etc.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we cordially invite scientists from around the world to contribute original research articles, long and mini review papers, short notes, and opinions according to their expertise related to "Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms". This Special Issue is aimed at collecting literature on the below-mentioned keyword topics, which can significantly increase our basic understanding of marine-derived compounds in cosmeceutical product development and increases the value of marine products at the industrial level.

Prof. Kyung-Hoon Shin
Prof. Se-Kwon Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anti-Oxidative Compounds

  • Anti-Microbial Compounds

  • Anti-Photoagaing Compounds

  • Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibition Compounds

  • UV-Absorbing Compounds

  • DNA protective Compounds

  • Photo-Protective Compounds

    • Terpenes

    • Carotenoids

    • Flavonoids

    • Tocopherol

    • Retinoid

    • Chitin, chitosan and their derivatives

    • Carrageenan

    • Chondroitin Sulfate

    • Fucoidan

    • Mycosporine-like amino acid

    • Proteins, peptides and Enzymes

    • Lipids

    • Fatty acids

    • Phenolic compounds

  • Marine Cosmeceuticals

  • Marine Pharmaceuticals

  • Industrial Products using Marine Compounds

Published Papers (11 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-11
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Mitochondrial Function, Mobility and Lifespan Are Improved in Drosophila melanogaster by Extracts of 9-cis-β-Carotene from Dunaliella salina
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(5), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17050279
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 1 May 2019 / Accepted: 8 May 2019 / Published: 10 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1702 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carotenoids are implicated in alleviating ageing and age-related diseases in humans. While data from different carotenoids are mixed in their outcomes, those for 9-cis-β-carotene indicate general positive effects, although basic data on its biological impact are limited. Here, we show that [...] Read more.
Carotenoids are implicated in alleviating ageing and age-related diseases in humans. While data from different carotenoids are mixed in their outcomes, those for 9-cis-β-carotene indicate general positive effects, although basic data on its biological impact are limited. Here, we show that supplementation with 9-cis-β-carotene in ageing Drosophila melanogaster improved mitochondrial function in terms of ATP production and whole-body respiration and extended mean lifespan. It also resulted in improved mobility. These data provide a potential biological rational for the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation with 9-cis-β-carotene. These effects may be based on the maintenance of a sound mitochondrial function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Marine Compound 3-Bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde Protects Skin Cells against Oxidative Damage via the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040234
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
PDF Full-text (3499 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to illustrate the potential bio-effects of 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3-BDB) on the antioxidant/cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in keratinocytes. The antioxidant effects of 3-BDB were examined via reverse transcription PCR, Western blotting, HO-1 activity assay, and immunocytochemistry. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis [...] Read more.
In this study, we aimed to illustrate the potential bio-effects of 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3-BDB) on the antioxidant/cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in keratinocytes. The antioxidant effects of 3-BDB were examined via reverse transcription PCR, Western blotting, HO-1 activity assay, and immunocytochemistry. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis was performed to test for nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binding to the antioxidant response element of the HO-1 promoter. Furthermore, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the cytoprotective effects of 3-BDB were mediated by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB, Akt) signaling. Moreover, 3-BDB induced the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, while inhibitors of ERK and Akt abrogated the 3-BDB-enhanced levels of HO-1 and Nrf2. Finally, 3-BDB protected cells from H2O2- and UVB-induced oxidative damage. This 3-BDB-mediated cytoprotection was suppressed by inhibitors of HO-1, ERK, and Akt. The present results indicate that 3-BDB activated Nrf2 signaling cascades in keratinocytes, which was mediated by ERK and Akt, upregulated HO-1, and induced cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
UVA and UVB Photoprotective Capabilities of Topical Formulations Containing Mycosporine-like Amino Acids (MAAs) through Different Biological Effective Protection Factors (BEPFs)
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010055
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The safety and stability of synthetic UV-filters and the procedures for evaluating the photoprotective capability of commercial sunscreens are under continuous review. The influence of pH and temperature stressors on the stability of certain Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) isolated at high purity levels [...] Read more.
The safety and stability of synthetic UV-filters and the procedures for evaluating the photoprotective capability of commercial sunscreens are under continuous review. The influence of pH and temperature stressors on the stability of certain Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) isolated at high purity levels was examined. MAAs were highly stable at room temperature during 24 h at pH 4.5–8.5. At 50 °C, MAAs showed instability at pH 10.5 while at 85 °C, progressive disappearances were observed for MAAs through the studied pH range. In alkaline conditions, their degradation was much faster. Mycosporine-serinol and porphyra-334 (+shinorine) were the most stable MAAs under the conditions tested. They were included in four cosmetically stable topical sunscreens, of which the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and other Biological Effective Protection Factors (BEPFs) were calculated. The formulation containing these MAAs showed similar SPF and UVB-BEPFs values as those of the reference sunscreen, composed of synthetic UV absorbing filters in similar percentages, while UVA-BEPFs values were slightly lower. Current in vitro data strongly suggest that MAAs, as natural and safe UV-absorbing and antioxidant compounds, have high potential for protection against the diverse harmful effects of solar UV radiation. In addition, novel complementary in vitro tests for evaluation of commercial sunscreens efficacy are proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Elicited ROS Scavenging Activity, Photoprotective, and Wound-Healing Properties of Collagen-Derived Peptides from the Marine Sponge Chondrosia reniformis
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(12), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16120465
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 23 November 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4910 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, the bioactive properties of marine collagen and marine collagen hydrolysates have been demonstrated. Although there is some literature assessing the general chemical features and biocompatibility of collagen extracts from marine sponges, no data are available on the biological effects of sponge collagen [...] Read more.
Recently, the bioactive properties of marine collagen and marine collagen hydrolysates have been demonstrated. Although there is some literature assessing the general chemical features and biocompatibility of collagen extracts from marine sponges, no data are available on the biological effects of sponge collagen hydrolysates for biomedical and/or cosmetic purposes. Here, we studied the in vitro toxicity, antioxidant, wound-healing, and photoprotective properties of four HPLC-purified fractions of trypsin-digested collagen extracts—marine collagen hydrolysates (MCHs)—from the marine sponge C. reniformis. The results showed that the four MCHs have no degree of toxicity on the cell lines analyzed; conversely, they were able to stimulate cell growth. They showed a significant antioxidant activity both in cell-free assays as well as in H2O2 or quartz-stimulated macrophages, going from 23% to 60% of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity for the four MCHs. Finally, an in vitro wound-healing test was performed with fibroblasts and keratinocytes, and the survival of both cells was evaluated after UV radiation. In both experiments, MCHs showed significant results, increasing the proliferation speed and protecting from UV-induced cell death. Overall, these data open the way to the use of C. reniformis MCHs in drug and cosmetic formulations for damaged or photoaged skin repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Acid- and Pepsin-Soluble Collagens from the Scales of Miiuy Croaker (Miichthys Miiuy)
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(10), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16100394
Received: 24 September 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 20 October 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this report, acid-soluble collagen (ASC-MC) and pepsin-soluble collagen (PSC-MC) were extracted from the scales of miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) with yields of 0.64 ± 0.07% and 3.87 ± 0.15% of dry weight basis, respectively. ASC-MC and PSC-MC had glycine as [...] Read more.
In this report, acid-soluble collagen (ASC-MC) and pepsin-soluble collagen (PSC-MC) were extracted from the scales of miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) with yields of 0.64 ± 0.07% and 3.87 ± 0.15% of dry weight basis, respectively. ASC-MC and PSC-MC had glycine as the major amino acid with the contents of 341.8 ± 4.2 and 344.5 ± 3.2 residues/1000 residues, respectively. ASC-MC and PSC-MC had lower denaturation temperatures (32.2 °C and 29.0 °C for ASC-MC and PSC-MC, respectively) compared to mammalian collagen due to their low imino acid content (197.6 and 195.2 residues/1000 residues for ASC-MC and PSC-MC, respectively). ASC-MC and PSC-MC were mainly composed of type I collagen on the literatures and results of amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE pattern, ultraviolet (UV) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra. The maximum solubility of ASC-MC and PSC-MC was appeared at pH 1–3 and a sharp decrease in solubility was observed when the NaCl concentration was above 2%. Zeta potential studies indicated that ASC-MC and PSC-MC exhibited a net zero charge at pH 6.66 and 6.81, respectively. Furthermore, the scavenging capabilities on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical and 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical of ASC-MC and PSC-MC were positively correlated with their tested concentration ranged from 0 to 5 mg/mL and PSC-MC showed significantly higher activity than that of ASC-MC at most tested concentrations (p < 0.05). In addition, the scavenging capability of PSC-MC on hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical was higher than those of DPPH radical and ABTS radical, which suggested that ASC-SC and PSC-SC might be served as hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical scavenger in cosmeceutical products for protecting skins from photoaging and ultraviolet damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Anti-Photoaging Effects of Low Molecular-Weight Fucoidan on Ultraviolet B-Irradiated Mice
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(8), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16080286
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 18 August 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2086 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ultraviolet (UV) B exposure induces DNA damage and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes skin photoaging through signaling pathways of inflammation and modulation of extracellular matrix remodeling proteins, collagens, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). As low molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF) has potential antioxidant [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet (UV) B exposure induces DNA damage and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes skin photoaging through signaling pathways of inflammation and modulation of extracellular matrix remodeling proteins, collagens, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). As low molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF) has potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the protective effects of LMF against UVB-induced photoaging. A UVB-irradiated mouse model was topically treated with myricetin or LMF at 2.0, 1.0 and 0.2 mg/cm2 (LMF2.0, LMF1.0 and LMF0.2, respectively) once a day for 15 weeks. Wrinkle formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, MMP expression, and apoptosis in the treated regions were compared with those in a distilled water-treated photoaging model (UVB control). LMF treatments, particularly LMF2.0 and LMF1.0, significantly inhibited the wrinkle formation, skin edema, and neutrophil recruitment into the photo-damaged lesions, compared with those in the UVB control. While LMF decreased interleukin (IL)-1β release, it increased IL-10. The LMF treatment inhibited the oxidative stresses (malondialdehyde and superoxide anion) and enhanced endogenous antioxidants (glutathione). Additionally, LMF reduced the mRNA expression of MMP-1, 9, and 13. The histopathological analyses revealed the anti-photoaging effects of LMF exerted via its antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and MMP-9-inhibiting effects. These suggest that LMF can be used as a skin-protective remedy for photoaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Protective Effect of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Celluclast-Assisted Extract of Hizikia fusiforme Against Ultraviolet B-Induced Skin Damage by Regulating NF-κB, AP-1, and MAPKs Signaling Pathways In Vitro in Human Dermal Fibroblasts
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(7), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16070239
Received: 12 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 14 July 2018 / Published: 17 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2562 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Our previous study evaluated the antioxidant activities of sulfated polysaccharides from Celluclast-assisted extract of Hizikia fusiforme (HFPS) in vitro in Vero cells and in vivo in zebrafish. The results showed that HFPS possesses strong antioxidant activity and suggested the potential photo-protective activities of [...] Read more.
Our previous study evaluated the antioxidant activities of sulfated polysaccharides from Celluclast-assisted extract of Hizikia fusiforme (HFPS) in vitro in Vero cells and in vivo in zebrafish. The results showed that HFPS possesses strong antioxidant activity and suggested the potential photo-protective activities of HFPS. Hence, in the present study, we investigated the protective effects of HFPS against ultraviolet (UV) B-induced skin damage in vitro in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF cells). The results indicate that HFPS significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and improved the viability of UVB-irradiated HDF cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, HFPS significantly inhibited intracellular collagenase and elastase activities, remarkably protected collagen synthesis, and reduced matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression by regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein 1 (AP-1), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways in UVB-irradiated HDF cells. These results suggest that HFPS possesses strong UV protective effect, and can be a potential ingredient in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Suppressive Activity of Fucofuroeckol-A Derived from Brown Algal Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura on UVB-Induced Mast Cell Degranulation
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010001
Received: 14 October 2017 / Revised: 12 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1172 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
UV light, especially UVB, is known as a trigger of allergic reaction, leading to mast cell degranulation and histamine release. In this study, phlorotannin Fucofuroeckol-A (F-A) derived from brown algal Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura was evaluated for its protective capability against UVB-induced allergic reaction [...] Read more.
UV light, especially UVB, is known as a trigger of allergic reaction, leading to mast cell degranulation and histamine release. In this study, phlorotannin Fucofuroeckol-A (F-A) derived from brown algal Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura was evaluated for its protective capability against UVB-induced allergic reaction in RBL-2H3 mast cells. It was revealed that F-A significantly suppress mast cell degranulation via decreasing histamine release as well as intracellular Ca2+ elevation at the concentration of 50 μM. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of F-A on IL-1β and TNF-α productions was also evidenced. Notably, the protective activity of F-A against mast cell degranulation was found due to scavenging ROS production. Accordingly, F-A from brown algal E. stolonifera was suggested to be promising candidate for its protective capability against UVB-induced allergic reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Antioxidative, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Aging Properties of Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms in the Protection of Skin-Aging
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040222
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
PDF Full-text (886 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes photoaging of the skin and induces a number of disorders, including sunburn, fine and coarse wrinkles, and skin cancer risk. Therefore, the application of sunscreen has gained much attention to reduce the harmful effects of UV [...] Read more.
Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes photoaging of the skin and induces a number of disorders, including sunburn, fine and coarse wrinkles, and skin cancer risk. Therefore, the application of sunscreen has gained much attention to reduce the harmful effects of UV irradiation on our skin. Recently, there has been a growing demand for the replacement of chemical sunscreens with natural UV-absorbing compounds. Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), promising alternative natural UV-absorbing compounds, are a group of widely distributed, low molecular-weight, water-soluble molecules that can absorb UV radiation and disperse the absorbed energy as heat, without generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 30 MAAs have been characterized, from a variety of organisms. In addition to their UV-absorbing properties, there is substantial evidence that MAAs have the potential to protect against skin aging, including antioxidative activity, anti-inflammatory activity, inhibition of protein-glycation, and inhibition of collagenase activity. This review will provide an overview of MAAs, as potential anti-aging ingredients, beginning with their structure, before moving on to discuss the most recent experimental observations, including the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which MAAs might protect the skin. In particular, we focus on the potential anti-aging activity of mycosporine-2-glycine (M2G). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Beneficial Effects of Marine Algae-Derived Carbohydrates for Skin Health
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(11), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16110459
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 15 November 2018 / Accepted: 17 November 2018 / Published: 21 November 2018
PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Marine algae are considered to be an abundant sources of bioactive compounds with cosmeceutical potential. Recently, a great deal of interest has focused on the health-promoting effects of marine bioactive compounds. Carbohydrates are the major and abundant constituent of marine algae and have [...] Read more.
Marine algae are considered to be an abundant sources of bioactive compounds with cosmeceutical potential. Recently, a great deal of interest has focused on the health-promoting effects of marine bioactive compounds. Carbohydrates are the major and abundant constituent of marine algae and have been utilized in cosmetic formulations, as moisturizing and thickening agents for example. In addition, marine carbohydrates have been suggested as promising bioactive biomaterials for their various properties beneficial to skin, including antioxidant, anti-melanogenic and skin anti-aging properties. Therefore, marine algae carbohydrates have potential skin health benefits for value-added cosmeceutical applications. The present review focuses on the various biological capacities and potential skin health benefits of bioactive marine carbohydrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Open AccessReview
Photoprotective Substances Derived from Marine Algae
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(11), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16110399
Received: 4 October 2018 / Revised: 18 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2778 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Marine algae have received great attention as natural photoprotective agents due to their unique and exclusive bioactive substances which have been acquired as an adaptation to the extreme marine environment combine with a range of physical parameters. These photoprotective substances include mycosporine-like amino [...] Read more.
Marine algae have received great attention as natural photoprotective agents due to their unique and exclusive bioactive substances which have been acquired as an adaptation to the extreme marine environment combine with a range of physical parameters. These photoprotective substances include mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), sulfated polysaccharides, carotenoids, and polyphenols. Marine algal photoprotective substances exhibit a wide range of biological activities such as ultraviolet (UV) absorbing, antioxidant, matrix-metalloproteinase inhibitors, anti-aging, and immunomodulatory activities. Hence, such unique bioactive substances derived from marine algae have been regarded as having potential for use in skin care, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. In this context, this contribution aims at revealing bioactive substances found in marine algae, outlines their photoprotective potential, and provides an overview of developments of blue biotechnology to obtain photoprotective substances and their prospective applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-Photoagaing and Photo-Protective Compounds from Marine Organisms)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Mar. Drugs EISSN 1660-3397 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top