Special Issue "Tribology and Contact Dynamics"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francesco Massi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy
Interests: tribology and dynamics; applied mechanics and biomechanics; friction-induced vibrations
Prof. Dr. Laurent Baillet
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Université Grenoble Alpes, ISTerre, Grenoble, France
Interests: friction; contact dynamic; rupture dynamic; rock slope

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contact Dynamics is at the origin of several macroscopic phenomena, which take place each time a contact interface is put in relative motion. As a consequence, this topic is a relevant issue in different disciplines such as tribology, earth science, vibrational mechanics, or fracture mechanics.

In recent decades, research activities have attempted to highlight the origin and main features of contact dynamics, focusing on its impact on the transient response of the frictional system.

Indeed, in many research and industrial applications, the coupling between local (contact scale) and system (structure scale) dynamics, during frictional relative motion, needs to understood to solve complex phenomena like brake squeal, fretting, earthquake faults, tactile perception, etc.

This Special Issue will promote the latest developments concerning experimental, numerical (finite element method, discrete elements, and atomic-scale simulation), and theoretical investigations in the areas of tribology and contact dynamics, in order to reinforce the interactions and collaborations between mechanical, seismological, and mathematical communities. Researchers working in the field of contact dynamics and related applicative issues are invited to submit their contribution.

Prof. Dr. Francesco Massi
Prof. Dr. Laurent Baillet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Contact dynamics
  • Interface waves
  • Friction-induced vibrations
  • Contact instabilities
  • Rupture dynamics
  • Contact simulation
  • Friction experimentation

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
A Multi-Scale Simulation Approach to Investigate Local Contact Temperatures for Commercial Cu-Full and Cu-Free Brake Pads
Lubricants 2019, 7(9), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7090080 - 04 Sep 2019
Abstract
Copper from vehicles disc brakes is one main contributor of the total copper found in the environment. Therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the automotive industries started the Copper-Free Brake Initiative. The pad friction material is essentially composed of a binder, [...] Read more.
Copper from vehicles disc brakes is one main contributor of the total copper found in the environment. Therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the automotive industries started the Copper-Free Brake Initiative. The pad friction material is essentially composed of a binder, fillers, reinforcing fibres and frictional additives. Copper and brass fibres are the most commonly used fibres in brake pads. There is a need to understand how the contact temperature distribution will change if copper-based fibres are changed to steel fibres. The aim of this work is, therefore, to investigate how this change could influence the local contact temperatures. This is done by developing a multi-scale simulation approach which combines cellular automaton, finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approaches with outputs from inertia brake dyno bench tests of Cu-full and Cu-free pads. FEA and thermal-CFD are used to set the pressure and the temperature boundary conditions of the cellular automaton. The outputs of dyno tests are used to calibrate FEA and CFD simulations. The results of the study show lower peaks in contact temperature and a more uniform temperature distribution for the Cu-free pad friction material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology and Contact Dynamics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Reconstruction of Governing Equations from Vibration Measurements for Geometrically Nonlinear Systems
Lubricants 2019, 7(8), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7080064 - 05 Aug 2019
Abstract
Data-driven system identification procedures have recently enabled the reconstruction of governing differential equations from vibration signal recordings. In this contribution, the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics is applied to structural dynamics of a geometrically nonlinear system. First, the methodology is validated against the [...] Read more.
Data-driven system identification procedures have recently enabled the reconstruction of governing differential equations from vibration signal recordings. In this contribution, the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics is applied to structural dynamics of a geometrically nonlinear system. First, the methodology is validated against the forced Duffing oscillator to evaluate its robustness against noise and limited data. Then, differential equations governing the dynamics of two weakly coupled cantilever beams with base excitation are reconstructed from experimental data. Results indicate the appealing abilities of data-driven system identification: underlying equations are successfully reconstructed and (non-)linear dynamic terms are identified for two experimental setups which are comprised of a quasi-linear system and a system with impacts to replicate a piecewise hardening behavior, as commonly observed in contacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology and Contact Dynamics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Non Smooth Contact Dynamics Approach for Mechanical Systems Subjected to Friction-Induced Vibration
Lubricants 2019, 7(7), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7070059 - 15 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The modeling of contact is one of the main features of contact dynamics in the context of friction-induced vibrations. It can have a strong impact on the numerical results and consequently on the design choices during the optimization or specification of industrial mechanical [...] Read more.
The modeling of contact is one of the main features of contact dynamics in the context of friction-induced vibrations. It can have a strong impact on the numerical results and consequently on the design choices during the optimization or specification of industrial mechanical systems. This is particularly the case for scientific studies interested in brake squeal. The objective of the paper is to recall and to promote developments concerning the use of non smooth contact dynamics approach for numerical simulations based on finite element method. The specific problem of the prediction of self-excited vibration in the context of brake squeal is discussed. In order to illustrate the potential benefit for the mechanical community of using formulations and theoretical developments from the mathematical community, the stability analysis and the estimation of nonlinear vibrations of a brake system with multiple frictional interface is investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology and Contact Dynamics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Estimation of the Normal Contact Stiffness for Frictional Interface in Sticking and Sliding Conditions
Lubricants 2019, 7(7), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7070056 - 02 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Modeling of frictional contact systems with high accuracy needs the knowledge of several contact parameters, which are mainly related to the local phenomena at the contact interfaces and affect the complex dynamics of mechanical systems in a prominent way. This work presents a [...] Read more.
Modeling of frictional contact systems with high accuracy needs the knowledge of several contact parameters, which are mainly related to the local phenomena at the contact interfaces and affect the complex dynamics of mechanical systems in a prominent way. This work presents a newer approach for identifying reliable values of the normal contact stiffness between surfaces in contact, in both sliding and sticking conditions. The combination of experimental tests, on a dedicated set-up, with finite element modeling, allowed for an indirect determination of the normal contact stiffness. The stiffness was found to increase with increasing contact pressure and decreasing roughness, while the evolution of surface topography and third-body rheology affected the contact stiffness when sliding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology and Contact Dynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessPerspective
Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Frictional Systems: The Interplay of Interfacial Friction and Bulk Elasticity
Lubricants 2019, 7(10), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants7100091 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Frictional interfaces are abundant in natural and engineering systems, and predicting their behavior still poses challenges of prime scientific and technological importance. At the heart of these challenges lies the inherent coupling between the interfacial constitutive relation—the macroscopic friction law—and the bulk elasticity [...] Read more.
Frictional interfaces are abundant in natural and engineering systems, and predicting their behavior still poses challenges of prime scientific and technological importance. At the heart of these challenges lies the inherent coupling between the interfacial constitutive relation—the macroscopic friction law—and the bulk elasticity of the bodies that form the frictional interface. In this feature paper, we discuss the generic properties of a minimal macroscopic friction law and the many ways in which its coupling to bulk elasticity gives rise to rich spatiotemporal frictional dynamics. We first present the widely used rate-and-state friction constitutive framework, discuss its power and limitations, and propose extensions that are supported by experimental data. We then discuss how bulk elasticity couples different parts of the interface, and how the range and nature of this interaction are affected by the system’s geometry. Finally, in light of the coupling between interfacial and bulk physics, we discuss basic phenomena in spatially extended frictional systems, including the stability of homogeneous sliding, the onset of sliding motion and a wide variety of propagating frictional modes (e.g., rupture fronts, healing fronts and slip pulses). Overall, the results presented and discussed in this feature paper highlight the inseparable roles played by interfacial and bulk physics in spatially extended frictional systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology and Contact Dynamics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop