Special Issue "Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 January 2022) | Viewed by 6076

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Wen-Dien Chang
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Guest Editor
Department of Sport Performance, National Taiwan University of Sport, Taichung 40462, Taiwan
Interests: sports physical therapy; sports injury rehabilitation
Dr. Shuya Chen
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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Therapy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
Interests: health behavior science; sports physical therapy; geriatric physical therapy
Dr. Chi-Cheng Lu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport Performance, National Taiwan University of Sport, Taichung 40462, Taiwan
Interests: exercise physiology; development of ergogenic aids; sports nutrition; cell biology; health promotion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sports injuries often occur during sports participation, training, and competition. To decrease sports injury occurrence and enhance injury recovery in order to return to play are the care goals for injured athletes. Many special prevention strategies and sport rehabilitations, such as nutritional or medical supplement, acupuncture, massage, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM), vibrating foam roller, low-level laser therapy, cold water immersion, kinesiology tape, etc., are used in the field of sports injury prevention and rehabilitation.

This Special Issue aims to highlight research from this multi-professional perspective within sports medicine. With an increasing number of people participating in exercise, innovative applications on prevention strategies and sport rehabilitations may improve the recovery of the injured tissue or increase the fatigue recovery for athletes. In many cases, these applications should not be only focused on the effects of sports injuries, but also on the management of the primary cause of the injuries. In this Special Issue, “Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation”, we intend to invite researchers to submit both original research and review articles in this field of sports injury and rehabilitation.

Prof. Wen-Dien Chang
Dr. Shuya Chen
Dr. Chi-Cheng Lu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Sports injury prevention
  • Sports supplement
  • Sport physical therapy
  • Sport rehabilitation
  • Athletic training

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Efficacy of Different Cold-Water Immersion Temperatures on Neuromotor Performance in Young Athletes
Life 2022, 12(5), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12050683 - 05 May 2022
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Abstract
Cold-Water-Immersion (CWI) has been frequently used to accelerate muscle recovery and to improve performance after fatigue onset. In the present study, the aim was to investigate the effects of different CWI temperatures on neuromuscular activity on quadriceps after acute fatigue protocol. Thirty-six young [...] Read more.
Cold-Water-Immersion (CWI) has been frequently used to accelerate muscle recovery and to improve performance after fatigue onset. In the present study, the aim was to investigate the effects of different CWI temperatures on neuromuscular activity on quadriceps after acute fatigue protocol. Thirty-six young athletes (16.9 ± 1.4 years-old; 72.1 ± 13.8 kg; 178.4 ± 7.2 cm) were divided into three groups: passive recovery group (PRG); CWI at 5 °C group (5G); and CWI at 10 °C group (10G). All participants performed a fatigue exercise protocol; afterwards, PRG performed a passive recovery (rest), while 5G and 10G were submitted to CWI by means of 5 °C and 10 °C temperatures during 10 min, respectively. Fatigue protocol was performed by knee extension at 40% of isometric peak force from maximal isometric voluntary contraction. Electromyography was used to evaluate neuromuscular performance. The passive recovery and CWI at 5 °C were associated with normalized isometric force and quadriceps activation amplitude from 15 until 120 min after exercise-induced fatigue (F = 7.169, p < 0.001). CWI at 5 °C and 10 °C showed higher muscle activation (F = 6.850, p < 0.001) and lower median frequency (MF) than passive recovery after 15 and 30 min of fatigue (F = 5.386, p < 0.001). For neuromuscular efficiency (NME) recovery, while PRG normalized NME values after 15 min, 5G and 10G exhibited these responses after 60 and 30 min (F = 4.330, p < 0.01), respectively. Passive recovery and CWI at 5 °C and 10 °C revealed similar effects in terms of recovery of muscle strength and NME, but ice interventions resulted in higher quadriceps activation recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation)
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Article
Determination of the Respiratory Compensation Point by Detecting Changes in Intercostal Muscles Oxygenation by Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Life 2022, 12(3), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12030444 - 17 Mar 2022
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Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate if the changes in oxygen saturation levels at intercostal muscles (SmO2-m.intercostales) assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) using a wearable device could determine the respiratory compensation point (RCP) during exercise. Fifteen healthy competitive triathletes (eight [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate if the changes in oxygen saturation levels at intercostal muscles (SmO2-m.intercostales) assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) using a wearable device could determine the respiratory compensation point (RCP) during exercise. Fifteen healthy competitive triathletes (eight males; 29 ± 6 years; height 167.6 ± 25.6 cm; weight 69.2 ± 9.4 kg; V˙O2-máx 58.4 ± 8.1 mL·kg−1·min−1) were evaluated in a cycle ergometer during the maximal oxygen-uptake test (V˙O2-máx), while lung ventilation (V˙E), power output (watts, W) and SmO2-m.intercostales were measured. RCP was determined by visual method (RCPvisual: changes at ventilatory equivalents (V˙V˙CO2−1, V˙V˙O2−1) and end-tidal respiratory pressure (PetO2, PetCO2) and NIRS method (RCPNIRS: breakpoint of fall in SmO2-m.intercostales). During exercise, SmO2-m.intercostales decreased continuously showing a higher decrease when V˙E increased abruptly. A good agreement between methods used to determine RCP was found (visual vs NIRS) at %V˙O2-máx, V˙O2, V˙E, and W (Bland-Altman test). Correlations were found to each parameters analyzed (r = 0.854; r = 0.865; r = 0.981; and r = 0,968; respectively. p < 0.001 in all variables, Pearson test), with no differences (p < 0.001 in all variables, Student’s t-test) between methods used (RCPvisual and RCPNIRS). We concluded that changes at SmO2-m.intercostales measured by NIRS could adequately determine RCP in triathletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation)
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Article
Effect of Increased Flexor Hallucis Longus Muscle Activity on Ground Reaction Force during Landing
Life 2021, 11(7), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070630 - 29 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Repeated high-impact ground forces can lead to injury and decreased performance. While increasing flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscle activity is known to increase stiffness and elasticity, it is unknown if this also decreases ground reaction forces by shock absorption during landing. This study [...] Read more.
Repeated high-impact ground forces can lead to injury and decreased performance. While increasing flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscle activity is known to increase stiffness and elasticity, it is unknown if this also decreases ground reaction forces by shock absorption during landing. This study aimed to determine whether increasing FHL muscle activity affects ground reaction force during landing in healthy subjects. Eight subjects performed single-leg steps onto a force platform for five trials, with and without flexion of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint at the moment of landing. Integrated surface electromyography (sEMG) of the FHL and medial gastrocnemius (MG) and ground reaction forces (GRFs) were measured. sEMG and GRF during the 50 ms before and 100 ms following initial ground contact were analyzed and compared. Flexion of the MTP joint condition significantly decreased the vertical and mediolateral force peaks of GRF, and FHL muscle activity increased. Flexion of the MTP joint at the moment of landing reduces GRF in healthy subjects through force dissipation in the foot, by increased FHL muscle activity. The results suggest that this may contribute to injury prevention by reducing the impact force through flexing the MTP joint at the moment of landing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation)
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Systematic Review
A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews on the Epidemiology, Evaluation, and Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis
Life 2021, 11(12), 1287; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121287 - 24 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2231
Abstract
The number of systematic review and meta-analyses on plantar fasciitis is expanding. The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of reviews on the topic pertaining to plantar fasciitis, identify any conflicting and inconsistent results, and propose future research direction. [...] Read more.
The number of systematic review and meta-analyses on plantar fasciitis is expanding. The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of reviews on the topic pertaining to plantar fasciitis, identify any conflicting and inconsistent results, and propose future research direction. A qualitative review of all systematic reviews and meta-analyses related to plantar fasciitis up to February 2021 was performed using PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. A total of 1052 articles were initially identified and 96 met the inclusion criteria. Included articles were summarized and divided into the following topics: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. While the majority of reviews had high level of heterogeneity and included a small number of studies, there was general consensus on certain topics, such as BMI as a risk factor for plantar fasciitis and extracorporeal shockwave therapy as an effective mode of therapy. A qualitative summary of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on plantar fasciitis provides a single source of updated information for clinicians. Evidence on topics such as the epidemiology, exercise therapy, or cost-effectiveness of treatment options for plantar fasciitis are lacking and warrant future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation)
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