Pollen-Based Reconstruction of Holocene Land-Cover

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 April 2024) | Viewed by 6265

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: palaeoecology; landscape change; fire history; charcoal analysis; pollen analysis; vegetation dynamics

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Guest Editor
Department of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
Interests: pollen-based land cover; modelling vegetation dynamic; plant composition and diversity; landscape change; land use

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Geology, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia
2. Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: palaeoecology; paleogeography biostratigraphy; climate reconstruction; palynology; radiocarbon dating; environment climate change; paleoclimate; paleoenvironment
School of Ecology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China
Interests: palaeoecology; biogeography; past land-cover reconstruction based on pollen

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Geography, Toulouse Jean Jaures University, UMR GEODE 5602, Toulouse, France
Interests: pollen-based land-cover and land-use reconstruction; vegetation and landscape dynamics; modern and past plant and landscape diversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land cover is a principal component of the earth system, which influences global and regional climate through biogeophysical and biogeochemical feedback processes. In addition, the application of pollen-based land-cover reconstructions in a regional climate model shows that anthropogenic deforestation has a significant effect on mean temperatures in both summer and winter. As the basis of the terrestrial ecosystem, vegetation is directly linked to landscape-scale biodiversity. Understanding the long-term interactions between climate, vegetation, and human activities is crucial for assessing future biodiversity and climate change and decision making for adaption. Recent advances in palaeoecological research have produced a number of different pollen-based quantitative land-cover reconstruction methods (LRA, MAT, Biome, etc.). Studies from northern Europe show a good correlation between pollen-based estimates and plant diversity, suggesting that palaeo-proxies can successfully be used to assess the dynamics of past vegetation diversity.

However, to date, the palaeoecological proxy-based quantitative reconstructions of Holocene land cover change have, thus far, only been available for Europe and some parts of Asia and northern China, based on REVEALS estimates. Furthermore, the pollen-based biodiversity assessments of mostly European origin have not been thoroughly tested in variable plant diversity conditions.

These shortcomings hinder our understanding of the past and predictions of future vegetation dynamics and their interaction with anthropogenic and natural drivers at local to regional to continental scales worldwide. Therefore, we encourage the publishing of new studies to fill the gaps in our knowledge of long-term land cover changes.

For this Special Issue, we are interested in contributions that are linked to pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene land-cover, including but not limited to:

  • Quantifying modern pollen–vegetation relationships;
  • Regional–continental scales vegetation reconstructions based on REVEALS model;
  • Local vegetation reconstruction based on the LRA approach;
  • Vegetation response to Holocene climate change;
  • Distinguishment of the effect of anthropogenic and natural land-cover change on climate;
  • Holocene plant diversity study based on pollen;
  • Novel methods in the quantitative reconstruction of past land-cover, based on pollen;
  • Feedback of land-cover changes on the climate system: perspective from climate modeling.

Dr. Qiao-Yu Cui
Dr. Laurent Marquer
Dr. Anneli Poska
Dr. Furong Li
Dr. Florence Mazier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • past land use and anthropogenic land cover changes
  • vegetation and land cover reconstruction
  • pollen-based climate reconstruction
  • holocene vegetation–climate interactions
  • holocene vegetation dynamics
  • climate–human interactions
  • plant diversity and biodiversity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 7364 KiB  
Article
Relative Pollen Productivity Estimates for Major Plant Taxa in Middle Subtropical China
by Qiuchi Wan, Kangyou Huang, Cong Chen, Yongjie Tang, Xiao Zhang, Zhong Zhang and Zhuo Zheng
Land 2023, 12(7), 1337; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071337 - 3 Jul 2023
Viewed by 952
Abstract
Relative pollen productivity (RPP) is a key parameter for quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation cover. However, RPP estimates are rarely obtained in the subtropical and tropical regions. In this study, the extended R-value (ERV) model was used to estimate RPP for major [...] Read more.
Relative pollen productivity (RPP) is a key parameter for quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation cover. However, RPP estimates are rarely obtained in the subtropical and tropical regions. In this study, the extended R-value (ERV) model was used to estimate RPP for major plant taxa in the evergreen broadleaved and mixed forests in middle subtropical China based on soil samples and vegetation data from 23 sites. The best result was obtained with the combinations of ERV sub-model 3 and Prentice’s or 1/d vegetation distance-weighting method. The relevant source area of pollen (RSAP) of the soil samples was estimated to be ca. 500 m. RPP on the basis of ERV sub-model 3 and Prentice’s model was obtained for seven taxa and the ranking is as follows: Castanopsis (1 ± 0), Ilex (0.352 ± 0.031), Mallotus (0.221 ± 0.028), Liquidambar (0.115 ± 0.007), Cyclobalanopsis (0.107 ± 0.006), Camelia (0.033 ± 0.001), Symplocos (0.010 ± 0.002). RPPs for Cyclobalanopsis, Camelia, Ilex, and Symplocos which are dominant elements in the subtropical evergreen broadleaved forests were first obtained. Our result demonstrates a significant effect of pollen dispersal models on the estimates of RPPs. The RPPs obtained in this study provide an important basis for quantitative vegetation reconstruction in the subtropical region of China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollen-Based Reconstruction of Holocene Land-Cover)
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27 pages, 5988 KiB  
Article
Testing the Effect of Relative Pollen Productivity on the REVEALS Model: A Validated Reconstruction of Europe-Wide Holocene Vegetation
by M. A. Serge, F. Mazier, R. Fyfe, M.-J. Gaillard, T. Klein, A. Lagnoux, D. Galop, E. Githumbi, M. Mindrescu, A. B. Nielsen, A.-K. Trondman, A. Poska, S. Sugita, J. Woodbridge, D. Abel-Schaad, C. Åkesson, T. Alenius, B. Ammann, S. T. Andersen, R. Scott Anderson, M. Andrič, L. Balakauskas, L. Barnekow, V. Batalova, J. Bergman, H. John B. Birks, L. Björkman, A. E. Bjune, O. Borisova, N. Broothaerts, J. Carrion, C. Caseldine, J. Christiansen, Q. Cui, A. Currás, S. Czerwiński, R. David, A. L. Davies, R. De Jong, F. Di Rita, B. Dietre, W. Dörfler, E. Doyen, K. J. Edwards, A. Ejarque, E. Endtmann, D. Etienne, E. Faure, I. Feeser, A. Feurdean, E. Fischer, W. Fletcher, F. Franco-Múgica, E. D. Fredh, C. Froyd, S. Garcés-Pastor, I. García-Moreiras, E. Gauthier, G. Gil-Romera, P. González-Sampériz, M. J. Grant, R. Grindean, J. N. Haas, G. Hannon, A.-J. Heather, M. Heikkilä, K. Hjelle, S. Jahns, N. Jasiunas, G. Jiménez-Moreno, I. Jouffroy-Bapicot, M. Kabailienė, I. M. Kamerling, M. Kangur, M. Karpińska-Kołaczek, A. Kasianova, P. Kołaczek, P. Lagerås, M. Latalowa, J. Lechterbeck, C. Leroyer, M. Leydet, M. Lindbladh, O. Lisitsyna, J.-A. López-Sáez, John Lowe, R. Luelmo-Lautenschlaeger, E. Lukanina, L. Macijauskaitė, D. Magri, D. Marguerie, L. Marquer, A. Martinez-Cortizas, I. Mehl, J. M. Mesa-Fernández, T. Mighall, A. Miola, Y. Miras, C. Morales-Molino, A. Mrotzek, C. Muñoz Sobrino, B. Odgaard, I. Ozola, S. Pérez-Díaz, R. P. Pérez-Obiol, C. Poggi, P. Ramil Rego, M. J. Ramos-Román, P. Rasmussen, M. Reille, M. Rösch, P. Ruffaldi, M. Sanchez Goni, N. Savukynienė, T. Schröder, M. Schult, U. Segerström, H. Seppä, G. Servera Vives, L. Shumilovskikh, H. W. Smettan, M. Stancikaite, A. C. Stevenson, N. Stivrins, I. Tantau, M. Theuerkauf, S. Tonkov, W. O. van der Knaap, J. F. N. van Leeuwen, E. Vecmane, G. Verstraeten, S. Veski, R. Voigt, H. Von Stedingk, M. P. Waller, J. Wiethold, K. J. Willis, S. Wolters and V. P. Zernitskayaadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Land 2023, 12(5), 986; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12050986 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4730
Abstract
Reliable quantitative vegetation reconstructions for Europe during the Holocene are crucial to improving our understanding of landscape dynamics, making it possible to assess the past effects of environmental variables and land-use change on ecosystems and biodiversity, and mitigating their effects in the future. [...] Read more.
Reliable quantitative vegetation reconstructions for Europe during the Holocene are crucial to improving our understanding of landscape dynamics, making it possible to assess the past effects of environmental variables and land-use change on ecosystems and biodiversity, and mitigating their effects in the future. We present here the most spatially extensive and temporally continuous pollen-based reconstructions of plant cover in Europe (at a spatial resolution of 1° × 1°) over the Holocene (last 11.7 ka BP) using the ‘Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites’ (REVEALS) model. This study has three main aims. First, to present the most accurate and reliable generation of REVEALS reconstructions across Europe so far. This has been achieved by including a larger number of pollen records compared to former analyses, in particular from the Mediterranean area. Second, to discuss methodological issues in the quantification of past land cover by using alternative datasets of relative pollen productivities (RPPs), one of the key input parameters of REVEALS, to test model sensitivity. Finally, to validate our reconstructions with the global forest change dataset. The results suggest that the RPPs.st1 (31 taxa) dataset is best suited to producing regional vegetation cover estimates for Europe. These reconstructions offer a long-term perspective providing unique possibilities to explore spatial-temporal changes in past land cover and biodiversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollen-Based Reconstruction of Holocene Land-Cover)
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