Skin Cancers: Biomarkers and Potential Therapeutic Targets

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Disease Biomarker".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2023) | Viewed by 8639

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. “Victor Babes” National Institute of Pathology, 050096 Bucharest, Romania
2. Department of Pathology Colentina University Hospital, 020125 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: immunity; inflammation; nanomedicine; proteomics; skin cancer; biomarkers; epigenome
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Pathology, Colentina University Hospital, 020125 Bucharest, Romania
2. Department of Pathology, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020125 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: dermatopathology; oral pathology; immunology; biomarkers, digital pathology; artificial intelligence development in histopathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin malignancies such as highly lethal and aggressive melanoma and non-melanoma cancers continue to represent a major health concern worldwide. Thus, investigations related to disease risk factors, novel biomarkers for early detection or therapy efficacy monitoring present potential directions advancing both skin cancer diagnosis and treatment. Recent progresses in melanoma in terms of immunotherapies aimed at checkpoint inhibitors have opened new sophisticated avenues to be explored for skin cancer in general and melanoma management in particular. Refined technologies and clinical approaches for cancer detection and monitoring are useful tools in deciphering biomarkers and potential therapeutic biomolecules or cellular pathways.

Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the dermato-oncology field by challenging diagnoses, therapeutic approaches, surveillance and the general management of skin tumors. This pandemic has further led to the exploration of new research areas, resulting in novel biomarkers’ disease panel at the border between cancer and infectious disease.

In this Special Issue dedicated to skin cancers and hosted by the Journal of Personalized Medicine, current findings in research and clinical approaches are welcome; this collection will pave the way for a precise and personalized medicine in skin tumors.

Dr. Carolina Constantin
Prof. Dr. Sabina Zurac
Prof. Dr. Monica Neagu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • cutaneous melanoma
  • basal cell carcinoma
  • squamous cell carcinoma
  • rare skin cancers
  • cellular biomarkers
  • molecular biomarkers
  • omics for cutaneous malignancies
  • targeted and immune therapy
  • technologies to assess biomarkers
  • skin cancers and COVID-19 pandemic

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2290 KiB  
Article
Correlation Studies between S100 Protein Level and Soluble MIA or Tissue MelanA and gp100 (HMB45) Expression in Cutaneous Melanoma
by Lucica Madalina Bolovan, Mihai Ceausu, Adina Elena Stanciu, Marieta Elena Panait, Antonela Busca, Camelia Mia Hotnog, Coralia Bleotu, Laurentia Nicoleta Gales, Mihai Teodor Georgescu, Virgiliu Mihail Prunoiu, Lorelei Irina Brasoveanu and Silviu Cristian Voinea
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(6), 898; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13060898 - 26 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
(1) Background: Cutaneous melanoma (CM) originates from melanocytes and causes 90% of skin cancer deaths; therefore, the comparison of different soluble and tissue markers could be valuable in the detection of melanoma progression and therapy monitoring. The present study is focused on the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cutaneous melanoma (CM) originates from melanocytes and causes 90% of skin cancer deaths; therefore, the comparison of different soluble and tissue markers could be valuable in the detection of melanoma progression and therapy monitoring. The present study is focused on the potential correlations between soluble S100B and MIA protein levels in different melanoma stages or with tissue expression of S100, gp100 (HMB45), and MelanA biomarkers. (2) Methods: Soluble S100B and MIA levels were evaluated by means of immunoassay methods in blood samples from 176 patients with CM, while tissue expressions of S100, MelanA, and gp100 (HMB45) were detected by means of immunohistochemistry in 76 melanomas. (3) Results: Soluble S100B correlated with MIA in stages III (r = 0.677, p < 0.001) and IV (r = 0.662, p < 0.001) but not in stages I and II; however, 22.22% and 31.98% of stage I and II patients, respectively, had high values for at least one of the two soluble markers. S100 tissue expression correlated with both MelanA (r = 0.610, p < 0.001) and HMB45 (r = 0.476, p < 0.01), while HMB45 and MelanA also significantly positively correlated (r = 0.623, p < 0.001). (4) Conclusions: Blood levels of S100B and MIA corroborated with melanoma tissue markers expression could help to improve the stratification process for patients with a high risk of tumor progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancers: Biomarkers and Potential Therapeutic Targets)
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15 pages, 18093 KiB  
Article
PD-L1, CD4+, and CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) Expression Profiles in Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment Cells
by Bogdan Marian Caraban, Elena Matei, Georgeta Camelia Cozaru, Mariana Aşchie, Mariana Deacu, Manuela Enciu, Gabriela Izabela Bălţătescu, Anca Chisoi, Nicolae Dobrin, Lucian Petcu, Emma Gheorghe, Laurențiu-Tony Hangan, Mihai Cătălin Roșu, Cristian Ionuț Orasanu and Antonela-Anca Nicolau
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020221 - 27 Jan 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2044
Abstract
(1) Background: Because melanoma is an aggressive tumor with an unfavorable prognosis, we aimed to characterize the PD-L1 expression in melanomas in association with T cell infiltrates because PD-1/PD-L1 blockade represents the target in treating melanoma strategy. (2) Methods: The immunohistochemical manual quantitative [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Because melanoma is an aggressive tumor with an unfavorable prognosis, we aimed to characterize the PD-L1 expression in melanomas in association with T cell infiltrates because PD-1/PD-L1 blockade represents the target in treating melanoma strategy. (2) Methods: The immunohistochemical manual quantitative methods of PD-L1, CD4, and CD8 TILs were performed in melanoma tumor microenvironment cells. (3) Results: Most of the PD-L1 positive, expressing tumors, have a moderate score of CD4+ TILs and CD8+TILs (5−50% of tumor area) in tumoral melanoma environment cells. The PD-L1 expression in TILs was correlated with different degrees of lymphocytic infiltration described by the Clark system (X2 = 8.383, p = 0.020). PD-L1 expression was observed often in melanoma cases, with more than 2−4 mm of Breslow tumor thickness being the associated parameters (X2 = 9.933, p = 0.014). (4) Conclusions: PD-L1 expression represents a predictive biomarker with very good accuracy for discriminating the presence or absence of malign tumoral melanoma cells. PD-L1 expression was an independent predictor of good prognosis in patients with melanomas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancers: Biomarkers and Potential Therapeutic Targets)
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Review

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15 pages, 3642 KiB  
Review
Langerhans Cells—Revising Their Role in Skin Pathologies
by Monica Neagu, Carolina Constantin, Gheorghita Jugulete, Victor Cauni, Sandrine Dubrac, Attila Gábor Szöllősi and Sabina Zurac
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(12), 2072; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12122072 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3335
Abstract
Langerhans cells (LCs) constitute a cellular immune network across the epidermis. Because they are located at the skin barrier, they are considered immune sentinels of the skin. These antigen-presenting cells are capable of migrating to skin draining lymph nodes to prime adaptive immune [...] Read more.
Langerhans cells (LCs) constitute a cellular immune network across the epidermis. Because they are located at the skin barrier, they are considered immune sentinels of the skin. These antigen-presenting cells are capable of migrating to skin draining lymph nodes to prime adaptive immune cells, namely T- and B-lymphocytes, which will ultimately lead to a broad range of immune responses. Moreover, LCs have been shown to possess important roles in the anti-cancer immune responses. Indeed, the literature nicely highlights the role of LCs in melanoma. In line with this, LCs have been found in melanoma tissues where they contribute to the local immune response. Moreover, the immunogenic properties of LCs render them attractive targets for designing vaccines to treat melanoma and autoimmune diseases. Overall, future studies will help to enlarge the portfolio of immune properties of LCs, and aid the prognosis and development of novel therapeutic approaches to treating skin pathologies, including cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skin Cancers: Biomarkers and Potential Therapeutic Targets)
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